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#161 Jason_Williams

Jason_Williams
  • Producer
  • Posts: 2208
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 26 May 2017 - 09:16

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Dear customers,
 
Today I’d like to share some straight talk with you about our current and future plans for the Sturmovik franchise. I took over as Lead Producer in August 2016 with the goal of improving Sturmovik and bringing it more in line with your original expectations, while at the same time bringing the product’s technology into the future. Matter of fact my goal was to improve, what I call the four key pillars combat simulations – technology, features, content and community. 
 
The past 9-10 months has seen Sturmovik be improved in many ways with new technology, more content and additional features being developed with more still to come. I also hope that some new out-of-game initiatives will further strengthen our small community even more.
 
Our Kuban development phase is going pretty well, but we always have challenges we must overcome due our overall lack of resources relative to our goals. However, we are confident Battle of Kuban will set the standard for WWII themed simulations and give you the simmer many years of enjoyment.
 
So, let’s talk about what happens after Kuban for a moment. When we announced battle of Kuban I made it clear that our intention (assuming it is possible) was to do something different, something many have asked for that would shake up the norm - The Pacific Theater starting with the Battle of Midway. It’s been over a decade since a new Pacific themed product was developed and I hope we can change this. After much research and thought we have come to understand that this will be an extreme challenge for us on every front.
 
It is such a challenge because we need to create large capital ships like aircraft carriers and their accompanying technology as well as create Japanese built airplanes. The Japanese airplanes pose the greatest challenge because we know little about their operation and there is not a lot of detailed documentation in either English or Russian. There is quite a bit in Japanese, but that means we need translators who can helps us which adds to our budgetary expenses in an already tight budget. This has added a new level of complexity we have not dealt with before. This is important to understand because the community has certain expectations of what level of fidelity we can achieve based on our previous products. Meeting those expectations with our Japanese airplanes might be very hard both in the visual realm and in the flight dynamics. For us to make the Pacific product a reality and worthy of the Sturmovik name we need your help. We cannot possibly locate everything we need ourselves.
 
What we need are detailed sources of information about Japanese airplanes such as engines, their systems, weapons and their flight performance in whatever language you can find, but we are especially interested in finding detailed Japanese documents that explain in detail how these planes operated, what their cockpits looked like and their performance. I have started a special section in the forum where you can help us locate such information. If you want to help us please visit this section and contribute.  Please read the instructions I have posted there before you post so we can be efficient. 
 
Additionally, I have posted several “help wanted” posts in our Jobs and Contractors section of the English language forum. We are looking for testers, talented artists and other creative people to help with various aspects of development or community related projects. Please check them out and if you meet the requirements please contact us. 
 
If you like what we have been doing with Sturmovik please consider purchasing all we have to offer or encourage your friends to make a purchase so we can afford the resources we need to venture the Pacific and beyond. We recently began selling Scripted Campaigns made by our own BlackSix. These are excellent campaigns and this kind of fun content helps sustain us during long, expensive development cycles. Please give them a look in our store if you haven’t already. There is no magic solution to our resource issue, we need your continued financial support to get the job done and keep going! 
 
And finally, I can’t leave you without some development shots. This time I present you some more Hs-129 development shots. And don’t worry the Spitfire is coming along as well. It’s just not ready to be shown yet.
 
129_01.jpg 129_02.jpg
129_03.jpg 129_04.jpg
 

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#162 Han

Han
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  • Posts: 554
  • Location:Moscow

Posted 01 June 2017 - 13:05

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Dear pilots,
 
Another week has passed and we're moving further in the development cycle of Battle of Kuban. There is only a bit more than half a year left until its release, so many of its parts start to look final already. The base of the new Career mode is already there: almost all the historical texts are ready as well as squadron insignias, we're working on the cutscenes. Its internal elements - GUI and mission generator patterns - are being filled with content. The flight physics improvements (enhanced fuselage tail modeling that will make the FM even more realistic at unstable flight modes and when there is a strong rudder input) are nearly finished, we plan to release the corrected FM in July. The work on Hs 129 B-2 (we did show you several screenshots with it last week) flight model is started. We just finished reworking the airfields on the Moscow map and in the coming update they'll be prettier at close and medium distances and, most importantly, the performance hit near them will be lower.
TacView API support will be improved as well - in the coming update the sim will export additional parameters and objects like projectiles, bombs, etc., we'll also take additional measures to block an unfair usage of this utility (cheating). New hotkeys for switching between the stations will be added - RShift-0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, where RShift-0 moves you to pilot seat and other numbers to different turrets on bigger aircraft like bombers. We've made huge progress on making ship models for Battle of Kuban as well.
 
Sub.jpg
 
And last but not the least, Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vb is nearly finished - our engineers are polishing its flight characteristics to make them as close to reference as possible while artists are adding final touches to its cockpit textures. Yesterday we completed its skins you can see right now. We hope that the update 2.011 that will give you Spitfire Mk.Vb will be released this month as it was planned initially.
 
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IL-2 STURMOVIK development manager


#163 Han

Han
  • Project manager
  • Posts: 554
  • Location:Moscow

Posted 16 June 2017 - 11:59

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Hello Everybody,
 
We're finishing our work on 2.011 update. It will bring you another Collector Plane - Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vb which has been used in Battle of Kuban. These planes were sent to the USSR via the lend-lease program. The update will also include the new historical campaign Blazing Steppe by Alexander =BlackSix= Timoshkov (you can already pre-order on our website).
 
However, in today's Dev Diary we'd like to tell you what will happen after this update - in update 2.012 that will be released later, possibly the end of July or early August. We already told you about the coming huge update of all aircraft (Battle of Moscow, Battle of Stalingrad, Battle of Kuban) flight models which will address such minor effects like oscillations in maneuvers, aircraft banking with full rudder input and control surfaces load changes at different speeds. These peculiarities, while being minor, are caused by deep flight model parameters. Tuning them meant a lot of work, but caused additional positive changes in the flight behavior of every aircraft in our project. We decided it would be the right thing to do to tell you about these changes in advance - what will be changed for each aircraft. We present you the full change list of the coming FM fix (once again, please note that these changes will be published later, in the end of July or early August, in update 2.012).
 
=========CHANGES implemented during 5 months’ work on the FM fix that will be in update 2.012=============
 
Common changes:
 
1. Aircraft stability along the pitch and yaw axes has been reworked. Planes reaction to control surfaces input became much less volatile and closer to reality.
2. Aircraft controllability was tuned simultaneously with the stability in the same control channels. Control surfaces inputs in different flight conditions became more realistic. Aircraft handling became much less 'sharp' and more convenient and predictable.
3. Roll 'dipping' after a full rudder input has been significantly decreased for all aircraft. Flat turns, coordinated side-slipping (straight banked flight with full rudder input for braking) and other maneuvers with side slipping motion at large angles became much closer to real ones.
4. Time of stabilizers and trimmers shift from end to end made more realistic.
5. Trim effectiveness has been corrected for several aircraft to correspond to the updated balance boundaries.
6. Load increase of the control surfaces has been corrected as the speed increases, changing aircraft controllability at various flight speeds and making them function closer to real data.
7. Because of the tuned stability characteristics, aircraft lose directional stability in an event of horizontal surfaces destruction.
8. Because of the tuned stability characteristics, aircraft lose lateral stability in an event of vertical surfaces destruction.
9. Because of the tuned controllability and stability and additional stall tuning, aircraft stall behavior changed. An aircraft sticks less in a spin, spin recovery became easier and more predictable. Therefore, an aircraft behavior during stall and spin became closer to the real thing. If there was a specific spin data available for an aircraft, it was taken into account to make the FM even more accurate (additional details follow below).
10. Thanks to aircraft stability and controllability changes taxiing and take-off and landing runs became more predictable and controllable.
11. Run-down time of the freely rotating landing gear wheels has been decreased by increasing friction values in the wheel bearings.
12. Landing gear brakes friction has been increased, making the aircraft stopping and holding while revving the engine(s) easier.
13. Air flow at beyond-stall AoA is now modeled better, making bobbling and shaking during a stall more realistic.
14. Control surfaces buffeting values at high flight speeds have been tuned: amplitudes were lowered, frequencies increased.
15. Flight stick and pedals shifting speed became slower even more due to increased load at high flight speeds.
16. Oscillation delay time of the sideslip indicator (the small ball) has been corrected.
17. Aircraft fragments behavior (unnaturally smooth fall of detached ailerons, elevators, rudders, etc.) has been corrected, especially at high speeds.
 
Additional clarification on fixes of Soviet planes:
 
LaGG-3 series 29:
1. Landing gear physics model has been revised. Now the aircraft is much less prone to 'circling', it is now possible to turn at 15-25 km/h speed without using brakes.
2. Take-off characteristics in crosswinds improved.
3. Pedals load at various flight conditions has been corrected (significantly increased at low speeds and significantly decreased at high speeds).
4. Pitch balance and its dependence on the flaps have been corrected.
5. Rudder, elevator and ailerons trim shift time from end to end increased from 6 to 8 seconds.
6. Elevator trim effectiveness has been decreased.
 
La-5 series 8:
1. Landing gear physics model has been revised. Now the aircraft is much less prone to 'circling', it is now possible to turn at 15-25 km/h speed without using brakes.
2. Pedals load at various flight conditions has been corrected (increased at low speeds and decreased at high speeds).
3. Pitch balance and its dependence on the flaps have been corrected.
4. Rudder, elevator and ailerons trim shift time from end to end increased from 6 to 8 seconds.
5. The aircraft stall behavior has been corrected using the data available. The stall in a level flight doesn't end in a spin, the aircraft proceeds to 'pancake', keeping the roll controllability. In a case of intentional spin entry, spin recovery requires intensive rudder input while failure to give it can result in a significant spin recovery delay.
 
I-16 type 24:
1. Pitch balance and its dependence on the landing flap have been corrected.
2. Flight stick load along the roll axis at medium and high flight speeds has been slightly increased.
3. Pedals load at various flight conditions has been corrected (increased at low speeds and decreased at high speeds).
4. Extended landing flap pitches the aircraft up significantly, on the glide path this must be compensated by flight stick movement forward.
5. Stall speed with the landing flap and gear extended is 3-4 km/h lower than with them retracted.
6. The aircraft stall behavior has been checked using the data available. The stall readily results in a spin, spin recovery requires intensive rudder input while failure to give it can result in a significant spin recovery delay.
 
MiG-3 series 24:
1. Roll rate at various flight conditions has been corrected (decreased at medium and high speeds).
2. Pitch balance and its dependence on the flaps have been corrected.
3. Elevator trim effectiveness has been decreased.
4. Elevator and rudder trim shift time from end to end increased from 6 to 8 seconds.
5. Flight stick load along the roll axis at high flight speeds has been slightly decreased.
6. Pedals load at various flight conditions has been corrected (significantly increased at low speeds and significantly decreased at high speeds).
7. The aircraft stall behavior has been corrected using the data available. The stall in a level flight readily ends in a spin, spin recovery doesn't require much effort.
 
Yak-1 series 69/127:
1. Pitch balance has been corrected.
2. Flight stick load along the pitch axis has been increased at high flight speeds.
3. Flight stick load along the roll axis has been corrected at any flight speeds.
4. Pedals load at medium and high flight speeds has been increased significantly.
5. Elevator trim shift time from end to end increased from 6 to 8 seconds.
6. Elevator trim effectiveness has been decreased.
7. The neutral roll position of the flight stick that was incorrect for joysticks without FFB has been corrected.
8. The aircraft stall behavior has been checked using the data available. The stall readily results in a spin, spin recovery requires intensive rudder input while failure to give it can result in a significant spin recovery delay.
 
P-40E-1:
1. Pitch balance and its dependence on the landing flaps has been corrected.
2. Pedals load at various flight conditions has been corrected (slightly increased at low speeds and decreased at high speeds).
3. The landing flaps drag has been decreased.
4. The aircraft stall behavior has been corrected using the data available. The stall in a level flight doesn't end in a spin, the aircraft proceeds to 'pancake'.
 
IL-2 mod. 1941/42/43:
1. Flight stick and pedals load at any flight speeds have been increased significantly.
2. Elevator trim shift time from end to end increased from 6 to 8 seconds.
3. The number of complete revolutions of the elevator trim handle in the cockpit has been increased.
4. The aircraft stall behavior has been corrected using the data available. The stall in a level flight doesn't end in a spin, the aircraft proceeds to 'pancake'. The stall in a turn ends in a spin.
 
Pe-2 series 35/87/110:
1. Pitch balance and its dependence on the landing flaps have been corrected.
2. Propellers backwash influence on the aircraft has been decreased.
3. Elevator trim effectiveness has been decreased.
4. Rudder, elevator and ailerons trim shift time from end to end increased from 6 to 8 seconds.
5. Pedals load at various flight conditions has been corrected (increased at low speeds and decreased at high speeds).
6. Flight stick load along the pitch axis has been increased at any flight speeds.
7. Pe-2 series 87 water radiators increase drag correctly as they are opened (previously the left engine radiators didn't increase drag while the right engine radiators affected the drag for both engine nacelles).
 
Additional clarification on fixes of German planes:
 
Bf 109 E-7:
1. Pitch balance and its dependence on the horizontal stabilizer and flaps have been corrected.2. Flight stick load at any flight speeds has been corrected (increased at low speeds and decreased at high speeds).
3. Flight stick load along the roll axis at high flight speeds has been increased.
4. Pedals load at medium and high flight speeds has been increased significantly.
5. Horizontal stabilizer shift time from end to end increased from 5 to 15 seconds according to the reference video.
6. Flaps extension time increased from 15 to 20 seconds according to the reference video.
7. The aircraft flight model is corrected to correspond to other aircraft FM (its difference was caused by attempts to fix the roll issues quickly).
8. Pushing the flight stick forward abruptly is less likely to cause an inverted snap roll or reverse spin.
9. The aircraft stall behavior has been corrected using the data available. The stall danger in a turn if an excessive flight stick input has been given is minimal.
 
Bf 109 F-2/F-4/G-2/G-4:
1. Their roll rate at various flight conditions has been corrected (decreased at medium and high speeds).
2. Pedals load at high flight speeds has been decreased.
3. Pitch balance and its dependence on the horizontal stabilizer and flaps have been corrected.
4. Horizontal stabilizer shift time from end to end increased from 5 to 15 seconds according to the reference video.
5. Flaps extension time increased from 15 to 20 seconds according to the reference video.
6. Flight stick load along the pitch axis has been increased at low and medium flight speeds.
7. Flight stick load along the roll axis at medium and high flight speeds has been increased significantly.
8. Pedals load at low and medium flight speeds has been increased.
9. Pushing the flight stick forward abruptly is less likely to cause an inverted snap roll or reverse spin.
10. The additional research on the aircraft stall has been performed using the data available. It stalls in a turn if an excessive flight stick input has been given. Spin recovery doesn't require much effort.
 
Fw-190 A3/A4:
1. Pitch balance and its dependence on the horizontal stabilizer and flaps have been corrected.
2. Flight stick load along the roll axis has been slightly corrected at any flight speeds.
3. Pedals load at various flight conditions has been corrected (increased at low speeds and decreased at high speeds).
4. The additional research on the aircraft stall has been performed using the data available. It stalls in a turn if an excessive flight stick input has been given. The stall starts very quickly after pre-stall buffeting.
 
MC.202 series VIII:
1. Pitch balance and its dependence on the horizontal stabilizer and flaps have been corrected.
2. Flight stick load along the pitch axis has been decreased at high flight speeds.
3. Flight stick load along the roll axis has been corrected at any flight speeds.
4. Pedals load at various flight conditions has been corrected (increased at low speeds and decreased at high speeds).
5. Horizontal stabilizer shift time from end to end increased from 5 to 15 seconds.
 
Ju 87 D-3:
1. Pitch balance and its dependence on the flaps have been corrected.
2. Flight stick load along the pitch and roll axes and pedals load have been increased at high flight speeds.
3. Rudder and elevator trim shift time from end to end increased from 6 to 8 seconds.
4. Elevator trim effectiveness has been decreased.
5. Propeller backwash influence on the aircraft has been increased (now more rudder input is required during a take-off run).
 
Bf 110 E-2/G-2:
1. Course stability while taxiing has been improved.
2. Pitch balance and its dependence on the horizontal stabilizer and flaps have been corrected.
3. Propellers backwash influence on the aircraft has been decreased.
4. Pedals load at medium and high flight speeds has been decreased.
5. Flight stick load along the pitch axis at medium and high flight speeds has been increased.
6. Elevator trim effectiveness has been decreased.
7. Rudder and elevator trim shift time from end to end increased from 6 to 8 seconds.
8. Engine nacelles drag correctly increases as they are damaged.
9. The aircraft is much less controllable at high AoA, now it stalls uncontrollably if you attempt extreme maneuvers.
10. The rotation rate in a flat turn is set according to the reference.
11. Aircraft stall in a level flight is much 'softer', without the tendency to enter a spin, as described in the reference article.
 
He 111 H-6/H-16:
1. Pitch balance and its dependence on the horizontal stabilizer and flaps have been corrected.
2. Flight stick load along the roll axis at high flight speeds has been decreased.
3. Pedals load at various flight conditions has been corrected (increased at low speeds and decreased at high speeds).
4. Flight stick load at various flight conditions has been corrected (increased at low speeds and decreased at high speeds).
5. Elevator, rudder and ailerons effectiveness has been decreased.
6. Rudder and ailerons trim shift time from end to end increased from 6 to 8 seconds.
7. Elevator trim shift time from end to end increased from 7 to 8 seconds.
8. Course stability while taxiing has been improved.
9. An issue with He-111 H6 roll trim after the right aileron loss has been fixed.
10. Water and oil radiators increase drag correctly as they are opened (previously the left engine radiators didn't increase drag while the right engine radiators affected the drag for both engine nacelles).
11. Engine nacelles drag correctly increases as they are damaged.
12. The misalignment of the animated and physical (true) position of the landing gear during its extension and retraction has been removed.
 
Ju 88 A-4:
1. Pitch balance and its dependence on the flaps have been corrected.
2. Flight stick load along the pitch axis at any flight speeds has been increased.
3. Flight stick load along the roll axis at high flight speeds has been decreased.
4. Pedals load at high flight speeds has been significantly decreased.
5. Elevator trim effectiveness has been decreased.
6. Rudder trim shift time from end to end increased from 6 to 8 seconds.
7. Ailerons trim shift time from end to end increased from 5 to 8 seconds.
8. Engine nacelles drag correctly increases as they are damaged.
9. Bottom turret drag correctly increases as it's damaged.
 
Ju 52/3mg 4e:
1. Pitch balance and its dependence on the horizontal stabilizer and flaps have been corrected.
2. Flight stick load along the pitch axis at medium and high flight speeds has been slightly increased.
3. Pedals load at medium and high flight speeds has been significantly decreased.
4. Engine nacelles drag correctly increases as they are damaged.
 
============================
 
To add a bit of visuals after this wall of text, we'll show you the Hs 129 B-2 paint schemes prepared by community enthusiast I./ZG1_Panzerbar:
 
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IL-2 STURMOVIK development manager


#164 Gavrick

Gavrick
  • Developer
  • Posts: 27

Posted 22 June 2017 - 11:30

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Hello everyone!
 
So, let's talk about Supermarine Spitfire Mk.VB. It took off for the first time in December 1940. Spitfires V were relatively old planes by the time the battle of Kuban begun in Spring 1943.
 
"VB" variant was armed with two 20 mm Hispano Mk. II guns and four Browning .303 machine guns. The guns were magazine-fed, 60 rounds per gun, while machine guns had 350 rounds per gun. The lend-lease aircraft sent to the USSR did not have bomb-carrying capabilities, some other equipment was also removed - gun camera, landing lights, IFF transponder, etc. Thanks to this, the aircraft became lighter roughly by 40 kilograms. The special snowguard was installed in front of the engine supercharger to protect it from dust or snow while taking off. Most of the planes sent to the USSR had Merlin 46 engine, but roughly one-fifth of them was equipped with Merlin 45. They differed by critical altitudes - Merlin 46 was designed for higher altitudes like 4-5 kilometers, where it was more powerful, but it was  80-100 HP weaker than Merlin 45 near the ground. Our sim will represent both engines (Merlin 45 will be a modification).
 
Spitfire instruments are similar to other planes, but there were some peculiarities. It was equipped with the rudder and elevator trimmers and the elevator trimmer position was shown on the instruments panel. The pitch up range of the trimmer is three times larger than pitch down.
 
The engine-propeller combination is controlled by the throttle, the automatic pressure limiter switch, the propeller control unit and the mixture control assembly. The throttle is linked to the automatic supercharger: when the throttle is set to any position from 1/3 to full, it sets a pressure supported by the supercharger from -7 to +12 pounds per square inch (PSI) relative to one atmosphere pressure. So 760 mmHg boost equals to 1 ATA and to +0 position on the British boost indicator. The automatic pressure limiter can be turned off to maintain constant +16 boost regardless of the throttle position. The automatic mixture controller maintains the optimal mixture setting if its control level is in the forward position or leaned mixture to save fuel if its control level is in the back position. The mixture control system has been removed on later Spitfires.
 
Water radiator is controlled by the lever to the left of the pilot seat which has six fixed positions and is set to 40% by default.
 
The fuel gauge indicates the amount of fuel left in the feeder (bottom) tank when the fuel gauge button is pressed. In the sim, the pilot automatically presses the button twice in a minute if he doesn't do active maneuvering. The amount of fuel left in the upper fuel tank can't be indicated.
 
Spitfire is equipped with a siren that warns a pilot if the throttle is set to a low position with the landing gear retracted. It turns off when the pilot either lowers the landing gear or increases the throttle or turns it off manually (in our sim the pilot turns the siren off after 3-5 seconds on its own).
 
The sideslip indicator isn't a small ball like on other planes, but an arrow. It functions essentially the same - there is a pendulum behind the instruments panel attached to this arrow.
 
The aircraft is equipped with two compasses - magnetic and gyro ones. Gyro compass should be caged up on the ground and while doing aerobatics (in the sim the pilot does on its own). There is a flight timer on the clock that is turned on by the pilot on its own after takeoff and turned off after landing. Upper and bottom formation lights can be turned on simultaneously or independently (RAlt+L).
 
The horizontal marks on the collimator gunsight are adjustable, so you can use it like a rangefinder. To do this, enter the target distance in yards and the target base (its wingspan) in feet by pressing RAlt + <, RAlt + >, RAlt + ; and RAlt + /. There is a sun filter on the gunsight.
 
While taxiing, keep in mind that Spitfire has narrow landing gear and large wings stuffed with weapons and ammunition, so they may touch the ground if you attempt a sharp turn, it also tends to 'circle'. On the other hand, it is stable on the runway during takeoff or landing. Its tail wheel rotates freely and does not have a lock.
 
Take off should be made at 3000 RPM and +12 boost with the landing flaps retracted. When airborne, reduce the boost to +9 and RPM to 2850 and climb in this mode.
 
The elevator is very sensitive and has very small stability reserve (the aircraft has a neutral static stability), so control the plane by gentle flight stick movements and don't overdo it. The pre-stall warning shake comes early, but if you continue to pull the flight stick and don't move it forward, the plane may stall and spin even at high speed. Flight manual says that you may enter spin only by a written permission of your squadron commander. Having the papers ready, enter the spin bravely - to recover from the spin, setting the control surfaces to the neutral position is enough usually.
 
As we mentioned above, the aircraft has a neutral static stability. Therefore, the balanced flight stick position doesn't change during level flight while accelerating or decelerating. However, due to the elevator peculiarities, the flight stick load will change and the pilot should push the stick forward harder as the speed increases. That's why the elevator trimmer has the large pitch down range. The elevator effectiveness is high, so any trimmer position could lead to high-g accelerations (and force pilot to blackout rapidly) at higher speeds in spite of the limited control surfaces effectiveness at high speeds.
The aircraft, especially untrimmed, should be controlled carefully at high speeds, not giving too much flight stick input since the high-g accelerations can potentially lead to a catastrophic structural failure.
 
The aircraft becomes somewhat unstable with extended landing flaps, but in spite of this, it is easy to land. It's recommended to keep 95-100 MPH speed on the glide path.
 
To summarize, Spitfire is a maneuverable, relatively easy to control and decently armed aircraft. However, its maneuverability (that comes from its large wing surface of 22.5 square meters, while Soviet fighters had ~17.5 sq.m. and Bf 109 had 16.2 sq.m) comes with the price of modest maximal speed near the ground.
 
 

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