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Jason_Williams

Japanese Airplane Reference Materials

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Everyone,

 

As mentioned in DD 159 we are in need of quality references for Japanese aircraft. Namely information about the following:

 

1. Cockpits

2. Engines

3. Systems

4. Performance

5. Construction

6. Weapons

 

We are in need of good images, drawings and cross-sections, informational texts, manuals, pilot guides, test data, performance graphs etc.

 

The planes we are most interested in at the moment are:

 

A6M model 21 "Zeke"

 

B5N2 "Kate"

 

D3A1 "Val"

 

F1M2 "Pete"

 

Please post such information here in this special section if you have anything useful. Before you post anything please follow these guidelines.

 

1. Don't post links to discussions elsewhere such as other game/simulation websites or forums that contain links to special materials. Please link directly to the materials here and state what the materials are.

 

2. We already have the TAIC performance reports from the war, but the section about the A6M Model 21 is missing as it was considered obsolete at time of publishing. If located this might be of use.

 

3. We have an entire set of Maru Mechanic books about Japanese airplanes. Please do not post items from these books unless they are translations of the material.

 

4. We already have the Rene Francillon book Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War. Please do not post information from that book here.

 

Please do not start discussing other topics in this section or speculate about other topics or the planes mentions above. Any off topic or unnecessary discussion will simply be deleted. We need to stay on task. Our ability to make this product rides on the data we have to make proper Japanese aircraft.

 

Thanks in advance to anyone who help provide useful information!

 

Jason

  • Upvote 7

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Have you checked the Bunrin-do series? Along with Maru mechanics, I consider them a good starting place.

 

WRT to performance, some English (US) Sources on the A6M can be found on http://www.wwiiaircraftperformance.org/ .

Edited by JtD

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Have you checked the Bunrin-do series? Along with Maru mechanics, I consider them a good starting place.

I have most of the Bunrin-do Famous Airplanes of the World Series. I have like 3 dozen of those books or more.

 

Jason

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Since Midway is priority I will focus exclusively on aircraft that participated in operation and wont add anything unrelated at this time. Post will be edited when I find more time to add all information. Also, please be advised that I do have documents that cannot be posted publicly or simply are too large to get added here so I will list what items I have and contact you or Viks on PM to consult how and when deliver them. Sorry for the inconvenience but my net connection is part of the problem.

 

General or hard to place under each of below categories:

- Schiffer Military History - Japanese Aircraft Equipment 1940-1945

- Model Art 272 Camouflage & Markings of The Imperial Japanese Navy Fighters in WWII

- Model Art 406 - Camouflage & Markings of Imperial Japanese Navy Bombers in WWII

- Model Art 595 Japanese Army & Navy Night Fighters

- Specification and Performance of Service Airplanes of the I.J.N

- Japanese Aircraft Interiors 1940-1945

- Japanese-Cockpit Interiors Part 1 and 2

- Investigation of methods of bomb sight drift correction of Type 90 Mark 1 bomb sight

- Analysis of aircraft engine performance with methods of calculating altitude performance

 

A6M model 21 "Zeke"

 

 

1. Cockpits

 

2. Engines

- The Zero Fighter - a large book containing reproductions of engine and construction manuals for Zero fighter models 21 to model 63

- Report on tests on 91-octane gasoline - Naval Air Technical Arsenal, Nov. 1941

- Report on tests of the Sakae engine manufactured by Ishikawajima Company, by Toshihiko Matsuzuki, Shizuo Maruyama and Sakio Tanozaki.

 

3. Systems

- The Zero Fighter - a large book containing reproductions of engine and construction manuals for Zero fighter models 21 to model 63

- A6M2 fire extinguisher manual translation

4. Performance

- JICPOA Item 5981 - Performance and basic data of A6M2 to A6M5 fighter

- Saburo Horita interrogation report - (A6M2 Zero performance) 
- Pelicans Perch 71 - Flying The Legendary Zero

- Preliminary Measurments of Flying Qualities of the Japanese Mitsubishi 00 Pursuit Airplane

- Results of Records Taken in Simulated Combat Maneuvers with Japanese Zero Airplane

- Measurements of characteristics of Japanese Zero Airplane in simulated combat maneuvers 

- Wind tunnel data # 368 - Test on A6M2 aileron hinge moment - A6M2 with and without balance tabs

- A Research on the Improvement of Flying Qualities of Piloted Airplanes - Reduced Stiffness Concept applied to Elevator Control System of A6M fighter by Jiro Horikoshi

- Report on Japanese reflector sight from Mitsubishi Zero type navy SSF by W. J. Chidzey, Melbourne, Victoria, Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation Pty. Ltd, July 1942

 

5. Construction 

- The Zero Fighter - a large book containing reproductions of engine and construction manuals for Zero fighter models 21 to model 63

- A6M2 Wing Rib Data

 

 

6. Weapons

- Zero Wing Cannon Charging and Firing Systems

- Firing Equipment of the Type Zero (Mark 1, Mark 2) Carrier Based Fighter Planes (Provisional Handling Manual) Type 99 20 mm fixed machine guns (Mark, Mark 2) with magazines holding 60 or 100 rounds, August 1943, Naval Air Technical Arsenal, Gunnery Department, Section 1

- Japanese Ammunition Leaflets Section B-Small Arms, Aircraft Cannon Ammunition 

- 7.7 mm Type 89 HE specification

- Naval 20mm Machine Gun by Kunimoto Sensyajyuku

- Examination of Japanese 20MM AP Oerlikon Ammunition US Report-1944

- Height of trajectory table for Type 99 mk 1 and mk2

- PACMIRS bulletin No. 62, 10 September 1945 - Blueprints of types of ammunition for light machine guns used in naval airplanes

- Diagrams of Type 1 Electric Fire-control mechanism model 2 and ammunition for type 99/20-mm machine canon 

- Type 97 7.7 mm Fixed MG Model 3, Modification 2 specification 

 

 

 

 

B5N2 "Kate"

 

 

1. Cockpits

2. Engines

3. Systems

- TAIC Report  44, Japanese Airborne Radio-Radar - used on B5N2

4. Performance

- Preliminary flight report on Kate 12

5. Construction

6. Weapons

 

 

 

D3A1 "Val"

 

 

1. Cockpits

2. Engines

3. Systems

4. Performance

5. Construction

- D3A2 maintenance manual

6. Weapons

 

 

 

F1M2 "Pete"

 

 

1. Cockpits

2. Engines

3. Systems

4. Performance

5. Construction

F1M Maintenance manual 

6. Weapons

 

 

 

D4Y1

 

 

1. Cockpits

2. Engines

- Aichi Atsuta Model 21 – Ha-60-21 (AE1A AC-19) engine diagrams

3. Systems

4. Performance

- Translation of a Judy manual

5. Construction

6. Weapons

 

 

Edited by =LD=Hiromachi
  • Upvote 7

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Hiro,

 

Do you have Skype? I'd like to be able to converse with you more easily on what you have either by text or voice.

 

Jason

Pat when you post links please describe what you are offering.

 

Jason

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Jason, there's an actual flying example of Zeke here locally...Paul Allen's collection in Everette.

I'm not sure if I can get permission to get up inside and take photos, but if there's a need I'll look into the prospect...can't hurt to ask.

They might be able to provide other information as well...I'm not sure how accessible these people are at this point - but in any case I'm close.

 

Who knows you might contact them and set up an appointment as well at some point.

Anyway, let me know if you want me to do some investigating.

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Do you have Skype? I'd like to be able to converse with you more easily on what you have either by text or voice.
 

I do, I also have discord, teamspeak, telegram and whatever you need Jason. Will get in touch with you later, now my tooth is screaming for attention with pain and I got a date with a dentist. 

If you can, send me on a last PM we had your skype contact, I'll add you as soon as I'm back. 

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Jason, there's an actual flying example of Zeke here locally...Paul Allen's collection in Everette.

I'm not sure if I can get permission to get up inside and take photos, but if there's a need I'll look into the prospect...can't hurt to ask.

They might be able to provide other information as well...I'm not sure how accessible these people are at this point - but in any case I'm close.

 

Who knows you might contact them and set up an appointment as well at some point.

Anyway, let me know if you want me to do some investigating.

 

Museums typically DO NOT offer their examples for use by sim developers WITHOUT major financial offerings. Which I cannot afford. 99% of the time they just ignore my requests. If anyone can get me in the door with a camera and a tape measure that's great, but I have tried for years and gotten nowhere. Neither Planes of Fame or any other museum or collection is very welcoming to me climbing around their cockpits taking pictures for a commercial project they are not involved with and without a $1 million insurance policy. I got access to the P-40 at Yanks in Chino and the whole effort was a hassle and a disaster, so not looking to repeat that again. But again, if any of you have access or can make it happen I am willing to show up or hire you to help do the research, but I'm not going that route myself at the moment.

 

Jason

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I get it Jason - I'll poke around a bit on my end.

Can't hurt.

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I don't know how useful it will be but I live in Tokyo so if you find that a source is (potentially) available anywhere here in a museum or library I'm happy to pop along and see what's actually available.

 

Also I can help out with some translation but not manual length stuff. Bit too busy for that...:)

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Surprisingly, nothing out of Kagero publishing on the three main Japanese types at Midway. I'm sending them a spare copy of an Aero Detail A6M edition.

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Hi Jason,

There is a book titled Great Book of World War II Airplanes. It's actually 12 books in one.

 

Very good soure of amrament, engines etc

 

The A6 is one of the books.

 

Hope it helps if you didn't already know about it.

 

Cheers,

Michael

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Sources should be selected and categorized since not all would be useful and not all of them are actual tests - for instance TAIC No. 1 manual states precisely that unless specifically said under each card, whatever aircraft performance is given its only a theoretical calculation based on data intelligence gathered. Sometimes its accurate, but for the most part its not precise and should generally be avoided as inaccurate. 

 

I'd split it into three categories : 

1. Direct sources :

a) Original Japanese documents

b) Reprints of original Japanese documents

c) Translations of original Japanese documents - this one is important, once you dig into archives you will find, that huge number of Japanese documents was captured and actually translated. Literally whole boxes of all kinds of data fell into Allied hands, particularly after capture of Saipan and Guam. It was possibly largest intelligence work of this kind ever done in the history. Translations were either carried by ATIS - Allied Translator and Interpreter Section or later ones PACMIRS and JICPOA. ATIS records not translated were returned to Japan years ago. 

Thing with translations is that many of them were after the war either destroyed (in 50s and 60s and especially during vietnam era when they were deemed useless) or stored with no indexes so one can spent whole day going through and archive and find nothing, but sometimes one can find a shiny jewel among of 50 other useless documents. 

Translations can be found in US and Australian archives. I have tried with AWM couple of times, ordered single documents - piece by piece. But its costly and inefficient. Poland is just too far from Australia to get exactly what I want.

 

Now Japanese archives are totally different story. They are still largely unexplored by western researchers. I'd certainly try it with couple of museums there and especially Mitsubishi museum which holds original Zero documentation. Shamefully no such thing can be done with Nakajima which after the war was split into a dozen of smaller companies by US occupation forces.

 

2. Non-direct sources:

a) Intelligence documents - basically whatever allied intelligence found, whether it was a fuel tank that they decided to test with their .45 1911 or a Zero gunsight. Plenty of those can be found, I have for instance a whole set of Technical Air Intelligence Summaries which were periodical publications about discovered items or intercepted data. 

b) Technical books - Gakken pictorial series, Model art series, few publications of Shigeru Nohara,  Design with Precision series by Matsuba Minoru, Maru Mechanic series, Aero-detail series, etc.

 

3. General purpose materials

Now under this category falls everything from Famous Airplanes of the World and older western publications to wikipedia. 

 

And speaking of contacts and museums, someone should contact Taizo Nakamura who actually works on Zeros. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by =LD=Hiromachi

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Jason. Did you have any luck with the library collection inside Planes of Fame or the Palm Springs Air Museum? They both recently cataloged all of their resources (books and manuals) they've acquired over the years. If not, I can try contacting them and see what they have.

 

--

 

Not sure if you've seen this, but it is assembly footage of the F1M2 Pete.

 

Edited by 12.OIAE_Stele

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Hi, Jason

Here is a very interesting link.
If you found someone who can translate this Japanese site I think it will help you.

 

One sees the gunsight system and the arming of AM6 zero :http://a6m232.server-shared.com/CCP019.html.

 

Here is another good source of information on Nipon devices :http://www.aviationofjapan.com/.

 

I hope that this will help. :salute:

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Jason. Did you have any luck with the library collection inside Planes of Fame or the Palm Springs Air Museum? They both recently cataloged all of their resources (books and manuals) they've acquired over the years. If not, I can try contacting them and see what they have.

 

--

 

Not sure if you've seen this, but it is assembly footage of the F1M2 Pete.

 

 

I don't have any good contacts at Planes of Fame. They do not return my inquiries. Have they listed what they have somewhere?

 

Jason

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One sees the gunsight system and the arming of AM6 zero :http://a6m232.server...com/CCP019.html.
 

This is precisely a website I was thinking of when mentioned Taizo Nakamura above. He posted there a lot of his daily work on Zeros he took part in process of restoring.

 

 

@up Jason, GregP from Planes of Fame was often taking pictures for me of various details of Japanese fighters or measuring some things when I asked him for. He is a very active and responsive user on ww2aircraft.net forums. You could try it that way.  

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To expand on what Hiromachi has already posted; there are a series of books published only in Japanese I think which have comprehensive technical information, mostly using reprinted original docs. 

 

I certainly don't have time (or capability) to translate a whole book, but if you're missing some information from other sources and can reimburse in some way the $20 or so to get the books, I can at least check if that information is in the book and send you annotated / translated scans from the books.

 

You can see one example here for the Type 97:

 

https://www.amazon.co.jp/%E4%B9%9D%E4%B8%83%E8%89%A6%E6%94%BB-%E5%A4%A9%E5%B1%B1-%E3%83%8F%E3%83%B3%E3%83%87%E3%82%A3%E5%88%A4%E5%9B%B3%E8%A7%A3%E3%83%BB%E8%BB%8D%E7%94%A8%E6%A9%9F%E3%82%B7%E3%83%AA%E3%83%BC%E3%82%BA-%E9%9B%91%E8%AA%8C%E3%80%8C%E4%B8%B8%E3%80%8D%E7%B7%A8%E9%9B%86%E9%83%A8/dp/4769809239/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_t_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=P5M5MGMMPBV3W1RXKP6Q

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Hi Jason. I am from Tokyo.

there is IL-2 community in Japan.

some guys really know about Japanese WW2 airplane. when you guys need us, we can help anytime.

for example, special gimmick of airplane like Automatic air fighting flaps(I don know that name in English ).

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Hi Jason. I am from Tokyo.

there is IL-2 community in Japan.

some guys really know about Japanese WW2 airplane. when you guys need us, we can help anytime.

for example, special gimmick of airplane like Automatic air fighting flaps(I don know that name in English ).

 

If that's on the Ki-43, that'd be Fowler flaps, which were used on the Ki-43 and P-38.

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1st. Ki-43 had a variation of Fowler flaps called Butterfly flaps, they were extending asymmetrically - the inner section would extend more while the one closer to the middle of the wing would extend less. This along with shape gave them name.

 

2nd. I think he means automatic combat flaps that were introduced on N1K1-J Shiden fighter, that would operate independently from pilots action, based only on acceleration and loads they would extend push aircraft further into a turn. Similar system was used later in A7M Reppu that was intended to replace Zero.  

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2nd - on the bottom line they were lift coefficient dependent (n/q ratio, with n being load factor and q dynamic pressure). The system is illustrated in the Bunrin-Do for the N1K.

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Sources should be selected and categorized since not all would be useful and not all of them are actual tests - for instance TAIC No. 1 manual states precisely that unless specifically said under each card, whatever aircraft performance is given its only a theoretical calculation based on data intelligence gathered. Sometimes its accurate, but for the most part its not precise and should generally be avoided as inaccurate. 

 

I'd split it into three categories : 

1. Direct sources :

a) Original Japanese documents

b) Reprints of original Japanese documents

c) Translations of original Japanese documents - this one is important, once you dig into archives you will find, that huge number of Japanese documents was captured and actually translated. Literally whole boxes of all kinds of data fell into Allied hands, particularly after capture of Saipan and Guam. It was possibly largest intelligence work of this kind ever done in the history. Translations were either carried by ATIS - Allied Translator and Interpreter Section or later ones PACMIRS and JICPOA. ATIS records not translated were returned to Japan years ago. 

Thing with translations is that many of them were after the war either destroyed (in 50s and 60s and especially during vietnam era when they were deemed useless) or stored with no indexes so one can spent whole day going through and archive and find nothing, but sometimes one can find a shiny jewel among of 50 other useless documents. 

Translations can be found in US and Australian archives. I have tried with AWM couple of times, ordered single documents - piece by piece. But its costly and inefficient. Poland is just too far from Australia to get exactly what I want.

 

Now Japanese archives are totally different story. They are still largely unexplored by western researchers. I'd certainly try it with couple of museums there and especially Mitsubishi museum which holds original Zero documentation. Shamefully no such thing can be done with Nakajima which after the war was split into a dozen of smaller companies by US occupation forces.

 

2. Non-direct sources:

a) Intelligence documents - basically whatever allied intelligence found, whether it was a fuel tank that they decided to test with their .45 1911 or a Zero gunsight. Plenty of those can be found, I have for instance a whole set of Technical Air Intelligence Summaries which were periodical publications about discovered items or intercepted data. 

b) Technical books - Gakken pictorial series, Model art series, few publications of Shigeru Nohara,  Design with Precision series by Matsuba Minoru, Maru Mechanic series, Aero-detail series, etc.

 

3. General purpose materials

Now under this category falls everything from Famous Airplanes of the World and older western publications to wikipedia. 

 

And speaking of contacts and museums, someone should contact Taizo Nakamura who actually works on Zeros. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have been on that Zero ( that if it A1-112) when it showed up on CYXY during 2012 for the summer airshow over at Alaska.   Now if i remember right the hydraulic powerpack was leaking at the time and we gave them 6 quarts of MIL 5056 H hydraulic fluid for the flight to Alaska. There is actually a wing locker at the inboard of the aircraft in front of the flap area. The hydraulic power pack is located at the side R/H side close to where the Japanese decal is. From what I hear from the pilot who has flown a few different zero this is is the worst condition one out of the ones he has flown, that why they use it to do flight training in (worst as in most used).   That aircraft does not have the original Sake engine but a Pratt & Whitney Radial 1830 twin wasp.  The cockpit is rather small but being Asian I fitted right in our director of maintenance found it rather tall for him and small but he is close to 6' 1.  The throttle has the controls for the guns cannons and the machine guns control are separated.  The stick is just a wooden stick.  Now from what the pilot says the ailerons feel heavy once you exceed 200 KIAS and the aircraft has no heat for the cockpit so it gets cold up at 15000 feet.  We had lunch with the crew at the airport chalet and they left for Alaska after and I look my King Air down to Prince Geroge BC.  

Edited by Simba
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I don't have any good contacts at Planes of Fame. They do not return my inquiries. Have they listed what they have somewhere?

 

Jason

 

The PoF library is open for research but you can't check any of the books out. They do have several of the book categorized on a computer system but I do not believe it is accessible online. The library is only open a two or three days of the week also. Saturdays are your best bet.

 

Wheels

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