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Jason_Williams

American and British Voice "Actors" Needed ASAP!!

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14 hours ago, Jason_Williams said:

What about the Brits then? I’m assuming the same?

 

Jason

 

Yes.

 

Have a look at the Angels One-Five script - the film was made with advisors who served during WWII as group controllers.

 

https://www.scripts.com/script/angels_one_five_2870

 

Where it says 15,000ft - that is conversation rather than control tower to pilot R/T.  My understanding is that the phraseology stayed constant through to 1945 but I cannot point you at a primary source.

 

Regarding mph or knots, as far as I can remember the RAF changed from mph to knots in April 1945.

 

von Tom

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Quote

ATTENTION: If you would like to help record American and British voices for Battle of Bodenplatte please download the following archive and follow the directions inside. The deadline to turn in your recordings is January 31, 2019. 

 

American_and_British_Voice_Recording_Instructions.zip

Thanks to all who have volunteered and if you have any questions please post in this thread. The work is not hard, just takes some time. If you are going to take up the work please sound off so I know  you are on it. The more voices we have the better. I hope to get 5-7 sets completed for both American and British by the end of the month.

My apologies it has taken so long to get this going. Lots going on.

 

Jason

 

Ok guys I've posted the instructions and files necessary to make the recordings. Again, this is for American and British voices. Various accents are welcome. If you are from the Commonwealth and your countrymen for sure participated in the RAF during this time and you want to record,  go ahead. I just don't know for sure what dialects will be in the final cut.

 

And please, no arguing over the text or how our radio system works. There is always room for improvement, but now is not the time argue about it.

 

Jason

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I'll get started today. British (Scottish).

 

 

 

Ardmore

Edited by =FI=Ardmore
Nationality

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I'm on it :salute: (British accent)

Edited by Johnny-Red

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Thanks guys,

 

If you notify me here that you are doing the recordings please say whether you are American or British so I can keep track. I look forward to the results.

 

Jason

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American

 

Will download when I get home. I have both a standing Mic and a Headset Mic.

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This is just like Voice Enrolling on the Air Traffic Control Tower Cab simulator when I was in the Navy.

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On 1/15/2019 at 10:10 AM, Murleen said:

I'll get started.

 

British by the way.

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Hey Jason, coming back to my previous comment, would you be interested in a French accent for the RAF ?

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15 hours ago, Lady_of_Voices said:

Gonna work on it tomorrow :)

 

I can do both British and American

 

I don't mean to be rude, but there are no female combat pilots for the UK, USA or Germany in WWII. Only the Soviets had some female pilots, which I hope to add at a later date. 

 

Jason

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https://www.thehistorypress.co.uk/articles/doing-their-bit-the-female-fighter-pilots-of-world-war-ii/

 

There were female fighter pilots for the Brits, but they just flew craft to the front lines and did not engage in combat. They were heard on the radios though. I just wish that I knew of declining my offer to voice sooner...lol

 

No offence taken, of course! It's a fun practice.

 

When you'd like to have some Soviet pilots, let me know! I can do that accent as well, easily enough.

 

:)

Edited by Lady_of_Voices
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4 hours ago, Jason_Williams said:

 

I don't mean to be rude, but there are no female combat pilots for the UK, USA or Germany in WWII. Only the Soviets had some female pilots, which I hope to add at a later date. 

 

Jason

 

 

Man we just had two Female Engineers go back home to Russia too. I could have asked them =o(. I didn't even think about it. Sorry buddy.

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I doubt that the developers will have much difficulty finding female Russian speakers when they need them. 

Edited by AndyJWest

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On 1/15/2019 at 1:12 AM, Jason_Williams said:

 

Ok guys I've posted the instructions and files necessary to make the recordings. Again, this is for American and British voices. Various accents are welcome. If you are from the Commonwealth and your countrymen for sure participated in the RAF during this time and you want to record,  go ahead. I just don't know for sure what dialects will be in the final cut.

 

And please, no arguing over the text or how our radio system works. There is always room for improvement, but now is not the time argue about it.

 

Jason

 

Hi Jason,

 

I have a couple of questions on the pronunciation of the callsigns:

- I assume "Javeline" should be "Javelin", like the pointy thing you throw at the Olympics?

- Should "Harrignton" be "Harrington"?

- Should "Belligham" be "Bellingham"?

- Is "Mitor" pronounced my-tor or me-tor?

 

Thanks!

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23 hours ago, Lady_of_Voices said:

When you'd like to have some Soviet pilots, let me know! I can do that accent as well, easily enough.

 

:)

Russian male voice acting is in Russian (thank god) so unless you are a fluent Russian speaker I doubt you can help with that.

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15 hours ago, Murleen said:

 

Hi Jason,

 

I have a couple of questions on the pronunciation of the callsigns:

- I assume "Javeline" should be "Javelin", like the pointy thing you throw at the Olympics?

- Should "Harrignton" be "Harrington"?

- Should "Belligham" be "Bellingham"?

- Is "Mitor" pronounced my-tor or me-tor?

 

Thanks!

 

Sorry some typos there. Yes you have them right and I assume it's my-tor.

 

Jason

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Are you sure about "mitor"? Not a word in modern English. Perhaps this should be mitre or minotaur?  

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Fair enough: I had not heard that one before. Then again "Gannic" which I have heard of, is not a word either.

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20 minutes ago, Murleen said:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Battle_of_Britain_squadrons seems to list "mitor" as the callsign for No 41 Squadron during the Battle of Britain...

 

Seems legitimate. From The Most Dangerous Enemy: A History of the Battle of Britain by Stephen Bungay, first published in 2000:

Quote

At 1415, just after the raid passed over Dungeness, they [Spitfire squadrons 41 and 92] heard:'Mitor and Gannic squadrons, tally-ho, tally-ho!'

 

I suspect call signs may have been chosen for distinctiveness rather than any specific meaning. 

Edited by AndyJWest

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I would love to have a go unfortunately i swear too much and have a harsh Belfast accent

 

 Hals und beinbruch

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On ‎1‎/‎18‎/‎2019 at 10:44 AM, Murleen said:

 

Hi Jason,

 

I have a couple of questions on the pronunciation of the callsigns:

- I assume "Javeline" should be "Javelin", like the pointy thing you throw at the Olympics?

- Should "Harrignton" be "Harrington"?

- Should "Belligham" be "Bellingham"?

- Is "Mitor" pronounced my-tor or me-tor?

 

Thanks!

 

Would they be pronounced Harringt'n and Bellingh'm etc?  The same way Melbourne is pronounced Melb'n, rather than Mel-borne as they do in the US.

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On 1/18/2019 at 11:51 PM, Feathered_IV said:

 

Would they be pronounced Harringt'n and Bellingh'm etc?  The same way Melbourne is pronounced Melb'n, rather than Mel-borne as they do in the US.

 

Probably. By Bodenplatte the typical RAF pilot's accent was probably less public school* than it would have been at the start of the war, and probably quite variable even without the input of Commonwealth pilots etc. There would have been regional accents, and possibly a trace of Cockney. What wouldn't have been there is the Estuary English that is so common now. That is a modern phenomenon: an example of the way accents change over time, and clearly not appropriate.

 

If you want a 'posh' RAF accent, listen to recordings of Raymond Baxter. Douglas Bader's accent is similar. For a regional one (well, Fleet Air Arm actually), Eric 'Winkle' Brown' gives an interesting sample. Audible Scottish roots, but probably indicative of a peripatetic life. 'Sailor' Malan was a South African, of Afrikaner descent, but there is little hint of that in his accent, which is classic 'received pronunciation', though to the trained ear a little less 'posh' than Baxter.

 

Baxter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MiJCd25FyHE

Bader: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yaPiTrHAL8

Brown: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sK0mZnBx94

Malan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4I5MpMj84A

 

* For the benefit of non-British readers, 'public school' in this context means a place where wealthy members of the public can pay to have their offspring indicated educated. Not a state school where the hoi-polloi would have received their education.

Edited by AndyJWest
Typo. Doh!
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For fairness I have to point out that WAAF personnel did do significant radio and RDF work. This places a female voice in the frame for the ground controller (and the airfield section of the script).

 

As a pilot in distress (RAF or USAAF) you could get a WAAF on the emergency channel and she would do her best to guide you to an appropriate friendly airfield. If you weren't going to make it they'd put a rescue launch onto your last known position. In some instances Ground Controlled Interception units were staffed entirely by women, from the radar operators, through plotters, to controllers.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/40/a3104740.shtml

 

To undertake the WAAF controller role, a native British accent would be essential.

Edited by Johnny-Red

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Just listened to myself. I sound like such an idiot =o(

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4 hours ago, Johnny-Red said:

For fairness I have to point out that WAAF personnel did do significant radio and RDF work. This places a female voice in the frame for the ground controller (and the airfield section of the script).

...

 

Fair point. Women played many significant roles during WWII (and even earlier, as I should have remembered since my maternal grandmother served with the Women's Royal Air Force during WWI), and might well have been heard in RAF radio comms during the Bodenplatte period. Not however as pilots, which is what Lady_of_Voices was suggesting above.

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One thing which just occurred to me... the British and American scripts have different callsigns (which makes sense, as the USAAF and RAF used different callsigns), but will this cause problems if British and American units end up talking to each other? e.g. if an RAF plane requests landing clearance at a USAAF airfield, will we end up with something like "Waterbury, this is Gannic, requesting landing clearance" and then "Elwood, affirmative, cleared to land"? Should we have the US callsigns recorded in a British accent as well and vice versa?

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Guys,

 

So far I've gotten two submissions. One American and one British. If there are any others out there in the works please let me know.

 

Jason

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Just now, Jason_Williams said:

Guys,

 

So far I've gotten two submissions. One American and one British. If there are any others out there in the works please let me know.

 

Jason

 

I'm about halfway through (British), but have lost access to my PC for the next couple of days, so will finish up at the end of the week

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@Jason_Williams

I am about halfway through them. Ill get them to you by EOW.

 

To join in this conversation as well. Perhaps she should record the British Spotter or Airfield lines?

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1 hour ago, -RR-Napoleon- said:

@Jason_Williams

I am about halfway through them. Ill get them to you by EOW.

 

To join in this conversation as well. Perhaps she should record the British Spotter or Airfield lines?

 

Umm... yes the instructions are to record everything in the list pilots, airfields, spotters and gunners.

 

Jason

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3 hours ago, Jason_Williams said:

If there are any others out there in the works please let me know.

 

I'll be recording a British English submission as soon as time permits, but I'm mindful of the deadline you posted and will make every effort to get it done ASAP.

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