Jump to content
56RAF_Talisman

Hint - Mosquito - look, no rivets!

Recommended Posts

Would love to see this aircraft with IL-2 GB.

 

 

 

Happy landings,

 

56RAF_Talisman

Edited by 56RAF_Talisman
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to see it in game as well! Either as a collector plane or part of the main plane set.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Cpt_Siddy said:

First composite construction plane mass produced and to see combat. 

 

Err.... Lagg-3 might get that honour and pinches it by a couple of months methinks...

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do find the Mosquito quite the amazing aircraft due to its construction. I may not work in aerospace but i am a mechanical engineer. During school we were taught a bit about using wood, it was mostly a "here's a table of the range of strength which any given piece of wood of this type might have, we will always assume the lower value" and that was that. For the low strength assumption wood is not a particularly great material for its weight; however, at the higher strength assumptions is a rather great material, especially for its price and machineability. Now i'm also not a carpenter, but i have attempted to work with wood a few times in non-structural uses, this made it clear how much of an art carpentry is. If you have carpenters with good eyes for wood you can make some phenomenally strong things. 

 

Concrete, on the other hand, is a fairly well-understood engineering material. It falls out of favor with many engineers aside from ones of the persuasion of building targets because it is not isotropic -- it does not have the same material properties in all directions. Concrete is incredibly strong, and hard, but it only works well in compression. Take a concrete pillar from a road (with rebar removed) and load it in tension and it'll break at somewhere around 1/5th the compressive strength (if i'm remembering these values right, it's been a while since i looked at them). 

 

So what we have is two materials which are already difficult enough to work with in engineering, then we go and throw them into an aerospace application *and* decide to use them in a composite. Building a single aircraft like this is already an impressive feet; however, going and designing this for mass production is the most impressive part to me. 

Edited by Kataphrakt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Kataphrakt said:

So what we have is two materials which are already difficult enough to work with in engineering, then we go and throw them into an aerospace application

And where pray tell, is concrete used in the construction of the Mosquito?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Elem said:

And where pray tell, is concrete used in the construction of the Mosquito?

 

Seems i'm miss-remembering this. I remember reading an article about some WWII aircraft which used wood laminate skin with concrete between for armor. Perhaps that was a reference to the Aerolite adhesive, or maybe i'm remembering a different craft. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, DD_Fenrir said:

 

Err.... Lagg-3 might get that honour and pinches it by a couple of months methinks...

 

Lagg used composite material, but it did not use composite construction. There is difference here. 

 

Edited by Cpt_Siddy
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Kataphrakt said:

 

Seems i'm miss-remembering this. I remember reading an article about some WWII aircraft which used wood laminate skin with concrete between for armor. Perhaps that was a reference to the Aerolite adhesive, or maybe i'm remembering a different craft. 

 

WRT to the Mosquito, mahogany or concrete forms (molds) were used to shape the fuselage during construction. No concrete in the airplane. ;)

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, RedKestrel said:

I would love to see it in game as well! Either as a collector plane or part of the main plane set.

"No @RedKestrel, that´s where you´re wrong. We´ll throw in another 109-version or two instead..."

 

Just kidding...🍻

 

@Jason_Williams  I guess you´re aware of the request for one of the most iconic a/c of WWII and the team is doing it already... Please don´t forget to do a proper bomber-version as well as a reconnaissance-version  since not all of us are fighter jockeys only. Plus, I am prepared to pay extra for a "Ship-/Sub-hunting-/ Blow-Up-Gestapo-HQ-map" as well... (hint, hint). And a final reason, why you have to do it: "Look, no rivets!" So, there is less work to do. 🤣 🍻

 

De Havilland Mosquito, hopefully not just a dream in IL2GB... Cheers guys!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, ROCKET_KNUT said:

"No @RedKestrel, that´s where you´re wrong. We´ll throw in another 109-version or two instead..."

 

Just kidding...🍻

 


Well, lots of people do love their 109s. They all look pretty similar to me when I look over my shoulder to figure out what just shot me to hell.

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would love a Mossie in game... I stumbled upon a video of the Lewis Air Legends Mossie (PZ474) in Talisman's first video and it brought back very fond memories of watching 633 squadron with my Grandad as a kid... Think I had forgotten my love of the Mossie (probably as we don't have an airworthy model) but what a versatile aeroplane - you name it, it could do it or give it a very good go!!

 

It would be a day one buy for me! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Cpt_Siddy said:

First composite construction plane mass produced and to see combat. 

You mean completely composite airplane as in WW1 several German planes had formed wooden fuselages.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, MiloMorai said:

You mean completely composite airplane as in WW1 several German planes had formed wooden fuselages.

No, i mean combining two different materials with one having compression strength and other is strong in tension in a monocoque construction. 

 

May planes and other structures had elements of this, yes, but none had it done in the  manner Mosquito was made.

50 minutes ago, J28w-Broccoli said:

Perhaps rather than concrete, they meant to say cement, as in adhesives.

No, they used glue. Only please where filler may have been used is to prevent the glue to seep in to balsa pores. Today we use plastic micro spheres, then it might have been something other...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the devs were to release the Mosquito, I will buy it. Fighter Bomber MkVI please.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Cpt_Siddy said:

No, they used glue. Only please where filler may have been used is to prevent the glue to seep in to balsa pores. Today we use plastic micro spheres, then it might have been something other...

 

Yes I know, but some use the term cement when referring to glue-like substances. 

 

What I am saying is that the misconception that concrete (also used interchangeably with the word cement by some) was used in the construction, comes from people reading from some source that cement (adhesives, glue) was used, and misconstruing that to mean concrete.

Edited by J28w-Broccoli

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, J28w-Broccoli said:

 

Yes I know, but some use the term cement when referring to glue-like substances. 

 

What I am saying is that the misconception that concrete (also used interchangeably with the word cement by some) was used in the construction, comes from people reading from some source that cement (adhesives, glue) was used, and misconstruing that to mean concrete.

Yes, that would make more sense, also, maybe there was some sort of substance used in form of a filler. Something light, that can be sanded down, resist water and painted on later. 

 

I've seen a lot of photos of materials and methods of the inner workings of the Mosquito, but i totally missed on the surface finishing part. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Cpt_Siddy said:

 

Lagg used composite material, but it did not use composite construction. There is difference here. 

 


What about the I-16? fabric covered wooden frame, laminated wood, hardened steel spars, duralumin cowling and upper leading edge wing surfaces.
 

Spoiler

type10-port-bare.jpg

i16type10-upper-bare.jpg







 

Edited by -=PHX=-SuperEtendard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, -=PHX=-SuperEtendard said:


What about the I-16? fabric covered wooden frame, laminated wood, hardened steel spars, duralumin cowling and upper leading edge wing surfaces.
 

  Reveal hidden contents

type10-port-bare.jpg

i16type10-upper-bare.jpg







 

 

We are reaching levels of "depends" that should not be even possible.

 

Composite in this contexts means that you are using materials that by themselves offers only one desired characteristic, together with another that offers other desired characteristic. 

In Mosquito case it was done for a whole fuselage and wings in a way that was never done before in such a big plane on such a complete level. 

For example, the wing spar structure for Russian wooden planes was far heavier than for Mosquito for the strength they provided because brits had access to balsa. 

 

Comparing Mosquito to I-16 is like comparing 100% carbon fiber aluminum honeycomb hull car to your Toyota hilux with carbon fiber spoiler made by Florida-man and saying they both are composite construction. 

 

Edited by Cpt_Siddy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cpt_Siddy said:

 

We are reaching levels of "depends" that should not be even possible.

 

Composite in this contexts means that you are using materials that by themselves offers only one desired characteristic, together with another that offers other desired characteristic. 

In Mosquito case it was done for a whole fuselage and wings in a way that was never done before in such a big plane on such a complete level. 

For example, the wing spar structure for Russian wooden planes was far heavier than for Mosquito for the strength they provided because brits had access to balsa. 

In an engineering sense we would call something a "composite" if it is a material made out of multiple materials bonded together. So IE gluing a sheet of wood to a sheet of metal across the whole surface would make it a composite. This is also extended to cases where you might use multiple types of steel, or multiple types of wood. Generally it's used for materials of different strengths/properties. Lamination means that it's just layered, but can be similar or different materials. 

 

1 hour ago, Cpt_Siddy said:

Comparing Mosquito to I-16 is like comparing 100% carbon fiber aluminum honeycomb hull car to your Toyota hilux with carbon fiber spoiler made by Florida-man and saying they both are composite construction. 

 

 

It'd be more like saying pointing to a Toyota with a fiberglass bumper and saying "it's composite construction" while true in the traditional and literal sense, it's generally not really that correct since the goal of using both the fiberglass and resin isnt to get two vastly different material properties, it's really to just make a laminate material. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cement is the 'glue'  that holds the concrete together.

 

concrete: cement, sand, stone, water, plus steel sometimes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mosquito firepower!

Firepower like this (please see photograph below) would be a nice historical addition to IL-2 GB.

And the bomb load is great for a two seater as fast as this.

Would love to see this bird produced by the hands and brains of the brilliant IL-2 GB development team.  What a treat that would be :)

 

Happy landings,

 

56RAF_Talisman

 

lChI89R.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...