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BlackSix

Developer Diary, Part 73

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I think this guy does not agree:  :)

I may have mistaken for sure, I don't know German at all. I just mean that it was a challenge to recreate all the signs, so typos are actually possible.

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I may have mistaken for sure, I don't know German at all. I just mean that it was a challenge to recreate all the signs, so typos are actually possible.

While I also think that an "I" would make more sense on that inscription, a "J" is not completely unthinkable. There are some street signs in southern Germany which also do this i.e. they say "Jnsel" or "Jm Winkel" instead of "Insel" or "Im Winkel" though it's a rather rare occasion.

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Nö nö da war schon ein "I":

 

Ist zwar ne A8

Yea but this is a restored machine. The writing doesn't have to match the original 100%. Check this one:

pda2q6mg.jpg

Yes it's blurry but you can easily recognize the "J" shape (actually it's a Schreibschrift I ). My assumtion is that "J" was commonly used instead of "I" to avoid any confusion symbol wise (normal large I may be difficult to recognize from distance).

 

Wäre gut wenn jemand dies bezügilch eine richtige Quelle hätte. Mich persönlich störts aber weniger :)

Edited by [Jg26]5tuka

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Denke dein Bild ist von einer restaurierten amerikanischen FW-190A8. Und seit wann haben Amis Ahnung von Deutsch :rolleyes:

fw190amisrqu7.jpg

 

Was zum Geier ist "Jm Probefall vorherige Einstellung des Schlagbolzens" da macht die Flugwerft Version mehr Sinn.

Leider finde ich keine historischen Photos die diesen Bereich deutlich und lesbar zeigen :unsure: .

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Wie schon gesagt denke ich, dass für das I eine andere Schriftart verwändet wurde. Klar sticht es heraus und maht auf den ersten Blick keinen Sinn, kann sein dass dies jedoch zur besseren Erkennbarkeit so geschrieben wurde (reine Spekulation meinerseits).

 

Was den Schriftzug angeht haste Recht... :scratch_one-s_head:

 

Who knows maybe someone can clear this up by providing an original german photography of WW2 :rolleyes:

Edited by [Jg26]5tuka

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Leider finde ich keine historischen Photos die diesen Bereich deutlich und lesbar zeigen :unsure: .

 

I've already posted in this thread an image of an original untouched armoured plate and it has the 'J'.

In the Hannover museum they restored the armoured plate and it has an 'I'.

 

http://forum.il2sturmovik.com/topic/8185-developer-diary-part-73/?p=139885

 

Perhaps the difference in font depends on type of plane? During the war they decided to use another font for some inexplicable reasons? Who knows.

Anyway, BoS uses the 'J' and DCS uses the 'I'.

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The so called "J" is absolutely ok.

I remember my grannies private letters which used to write our modern "I" as "J" looking.

In my first school year I was also taught to write the "I" like that looking "J".

Changed in the second class by another teacher.

However it is not really of weighting interests for the game ... imho.

Edited by 1./JG42Nephris
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The so called "J" is absolutely ok.

I remember my grannies private letters which used to write our modern "I" as "J" looking.

In my first school year I was also taught to write the "I" like that looking "J".

Changed in the second class by another teacher.

However it is not really of weighting interests for the game ... imho.

 

When I was learning to write [German], which wasn't that long ago, we wrote 'I' like 'J' too, so there's nothing wrong with it.

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Of course in hand writing the "I" as "J" was and still is very common. I've also only seen very very few people actually hand writing an "f" or "a" like how it looks on printed text. But this is not hand writing.

 

It looks like both "J" and "I" were used in this case. Maybe the "J" got replaced by the "I" at some point or they were both used simultaniously during the entire production time. I suspect the former, but who knows. Maybe that even depended on the factory.

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interesting, Germans don't remember their own language. such as why they would use a 7 with a line drawn in the middle of it?

I would half hazard a guess, as it was to prevent it from being mistaken for a #1?

 

Same as a capital I was replaced with a J, so the I wasn't mistaken as a number #1?

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To provide some additional information about the signalisatrice plate located on the pilot's head armor.

I could see the two ways to enter the capital "I" printed on this panel (either "I" or a "J").

As regards the second word of the last line (or Sicherung Einstellung).

A priori, the two terms are actually existing. After the information requested at the Musée de l'Air et de l'Espace du Bourget (France) and the DeutscheMuseum, München, the answer was "Sicherung." At my request made ​​to the NASM Washington (USA) the answer was "Einstellung." Be aware that the information"European" came about Fw-190 Release A. For the answer against the NASM was made ​​after a Fw-190D-9. From there to think that the term "Sicherung" was used for the Fw-190 in earlier versions Fw-190D, ????

friendships

DAN

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interesting, Germans don't remember their own language. such as why they would use a 7 with a line drawn in the middle of it?

I would half hazard a guess, as it was to prevent it from being mistaken for a #1?

 

Same as a capital I was replaced with a J, so the I wasn't mistaken as a number #1?

 

We don't remember our own language? I'm pretty sure we do; we couldn't speak it otherwise. :D

And yes, we still write 7 with a line through it, because the "German one" has a little diagonal coming out of the top ( 1 ), and we need to distinguish the two. As opposed to the English way of writing the number one as " I " and seven as " 7 ".

Edited by LeafyPredicament

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I would half hazard a guess, as it was to prevent it from being mistaken for a #1?

 

Same as a capital I was replaced with a J, so the I wasn't mistaken as a number #1?

That could be a possible explaination. It's highly speculated as long as we don't have any historical pictures or any other evidence to prove it.

 

It's not we don't remember our language, we just don't know who restored the sign correctly ;)

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