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ZachariasX

Some impressions about flying a real Spitfire (TR-9)

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Posted (edited)

What an amazing account @ZachariasX. Thanks so much for the insight. Every virtual pilots dream I'm sure .... I certainly would love the chance.
Down at goodwood they have the most realistic Spitfire simulator in the world where you can actually go and try it out, for £200, probably more realistic for most people. They have a rig with SEVEN computers.
http://www.boultbeeflightacademy.co.uk/spitfiresimulator

As for those discussing owning your own Spitfire, It's not just about the purchase price of the aircraft, you also have to take into account running costs and licensing. You do indeed have to be a millionaire to afford one, fly it, and keep it flying.

£150,000 (minimum) to get your license to fly it.
£30,000 per annum insurance.
£50,000 a year maintainence.
£120,000 for engine overhaul after 500hrs
£342 per hour fuel, if you are conservative.
£ (unknown) hanger fees ... you don't want to keep these things outside.

You're very limited as to how you can fly it, and if you exceed 5g you need a full inspection costing lots and lots of ££££. You can't really exceed 1/3 throttle, and you also have to add storage fees for a hanger and take-off and landing fees to the aerodrome.

Source: The operators at Goodwood Aerodrome who operate them ...
https://www.goodwood.com/flying/latest-news/so-youre-thinking-of-buying-a-spitfire/

Edited by 334th_KMA
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AFAIK, the Goodwood Spitfire simulator is an A2A Simulations implementation. There might be a chance we get that module as well for P3D. It would add the Mk.IX to the Baby Spit already on sale in their store.

 

Regarding operational costs, I think they are very optimistic that all goes well like planned with 70 year old vehicles. One nice day, you‘ll walk up to her and you‘ll notice she going *dripdrip-dripdrip-dripdrip* instead of the good English *drip - drip - drip* while leaking (mostly) oil. This will make the mechanic look at it making a puzzled, but slightly scared face. And none of the cost projections will hold meaning anymore.

Money-toilet.jpg?w=640

But then again, it will make you learn again a lot about that plane.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, ZachariasX said:

AFAIK, the Goodwood Spitfire simulator is an A2A Simulations implementation. There might be a chance we get that module as well for P3D. It would add the Mk.IX to the Baby Spit already on sale in their store.

 

Regarding operational costs, I think they are very optimistic that all goes well like planned with 70 year old vehicles. One nice day, you‘ll walk up to her and you‘ll notice she going *dripdrip-dripdrip-dripdrip* instead of the good English *drip - drip - drip* while leaking (mostly) oil. This will make the mechanic look at it making a puzzled, but slightly scared face. And none of the cost projections will hold meaning anymore.

Money-toilet.jpg?w=640

But then again, it will make you learn again a lot about that plane.


100% correct on the Software side of things regards the Boultbee Simulator, which apparantly has approval from the CAA.
The build was put together by Airtech Simulations.
https://www.airtechsimulation.co.uk/projects?fbclid=IwAR3lAkaqKaWX3BVZoUsRS91yLW8G9HXJ308qqIHAsBLWWRk4-hRpr9UXBUI

 

As for the operational costs, you're again correct. Much an "if all goes well" scenario, which possibly wouldn't include repair costs if you had a problem with your undercarriage like ARCo did with their T9 Spitfire PT462 recently, when she had a hydraulic failure and needed to land wheels up at Denham Aerodrome back in February.
https://aerodynamicmedia.com/pt462-gear-up-landing/
Whether the insurance would cover the costs in entireity, such as recovery, transportation, parts, man hours to repair I'm not sure. If it does I wonder how much the premium would go up by the following year. I have to say that although the article is old now, the pilot did a great job of bringing her down without much damage. It could have been much worse apparantly.

I'm sure the person in the back seat had an unforgettable experience too !!!

Edited by 334th_KMA
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1 hour ago, 334th_KMA said:

I'm sure the person in the back seat had an unforgettable experience too !!! 

 

That person could proof that (s)he really listened to the instructors and that (s)he could follow the ARC! ARC! ARC! command, at which you are supposed to reach down with your right hand on the right besides your seat moving the lever such that your seat is all the way down, then reach up and pull that red knob to jettison the canopy (the safety bolts are held by a remarkably thin wire) and then over to your left opening that little door. (It's about half the site in the back seat than the one in the front.) Then follow BRACE! BRACE! BRACE! command to put your head down in your crossed arms. (Fingers crossed.)

 

It is truly remarkable how you can put her down in a very small field. I had expected a LearJet like approach. It's none like that. You can bring her in like a Cessna and at not that much higer speeds. Just the sink rate is much higher. There, you notice the extra two tons.

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Thanks for a great write up! That was a wonderful read. 

Regarding the rest of the discussion, more wobble is not at all more realistic. 

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