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Il-2 Battle for New Guinea

Battle for New Guinea  

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  1. 1. Would you like to see this as future expansion ?

    • Yes
      159
    • No
      25


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Since it is so often brought up and discussed, and despite my previous proposition of Burma, I still mostly desire a green hell, as New Guinea was called by the Japanese pilots. Based on that I have decided to prepare the following proposition of New Guinea events that took part roughly between late 1942 and early 1944. A critical months for battle in the unfriendly environment as the New Guina was. While some might be concerned with the size of the map, large part of it is plain water which I believe allows to extend the limits, thus giving an opportunity to introduce a bigger maps without stretching of the limits. 

 

oc9ugC.jpg

 

 

 

The Area

This is the map that has marked important places as well as important campaigns, with lesser operations omitted due to time limits :

OheYUe.jpg

The marked area is aprox 300 km long and 430 km wide, giving us area of 130 000 km2 with more than half of it being water.  

 

 

Here is a more modern and accurate map with precise area :

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1L6dFYUx9Uwb1crjksYa9VPWAlK4&usp=sharing

 

Timeframe

Considering the vast territories and simply amount of operations carried by both sides I came up with an idea of limiting the game campaign to a period of September 1942 with Japanese withdrawl from Kokoda trail and allied preparations for capture of Buna-Gona territory as an entry phase and Allied landings at Arawe point in the end of 1943/beginning of 1944 as last phase. 

 

 

Intro

 

When on 22nd and 23rd December 1942, Ki-43 pilots of the Japanese Army 11th Sentai failed to down a B-17 from 43rd bomber Group that was flying a recce mission over the major IJN base of Rabaul, they were ridiculosed by their Navy counterparts. Yet, it was the Imperial Japanese Navy that have requested the Japanese Army assistance and support in the South West perimiter, when realized that cannot keep fighting for both Solomon Islands and New Guinea. Land-based aviation units of the Navy suffered serious losses in both areas and therefore the help of Japanese Army was requested in late 1942. 

 

New Guinea was area of various operations from March 1942 and great events already happened there (Battle of the Eastern Solomons, Air campaign against Port Moresby, etc.) however it was about to enter a new phase since it became an important part in Allied strategy to surround Rabaul and remove Japanese resistance from South Western Pacific Area. 

 

Operations (campaign phases):

 

1. Kokoda trail withdrawl and Allied flanking through Kapa Kapa trail - September 1942 - November 1942

 

   Famous campaign for Kokoda trail started in late July and by the September Japanese were forced to retreat, due to decision made in Japan that in fact of two campaigns - Guadalcanal and New Guinea, the latter one cannot be further supported. Lieutenant General Harukichi Hyakutake decided that he only had sufficient troops and materiel to defeat the Allied forces on Guadalcanal. He prepared to send more troops to Guadalcanal in another attempt to recapture the airfield. With the concurrence of the Japanese command staff, he ordered General Horii to withdraw his troops on the Kokoda Track until the issue at Guadalcanal was decided. The Japanese troops were, after several weeks of exhausting fighting and heavy losses, within 32 kilometres of Port Moresby.

 

So close, and yet so far.

 

 

General Horii and his troops were disheartened to learn their sacrifice and those of their dead companions was to be for nothing. On 28 September, they began to hastily withdraw northward over the Owen Stanley Mountains to Kokoda and then to Buna-Gona. Japanese prepared their positions around Buna-Gona area (with key airfield, only one of that size in the area) for defense. Japanese engineers had been busy along the Buna, Sanananda and Gona coast building up a 20 kilometres long line of in-depth, mutually supporting defensive positions, built on the only available solid ground. These were constructed of coconut tree logs, concrete, and steel drums, and were disguised by rapid-growing jungle vegetation, and defended by an estimated 6,500 Japanese.

 

 

6FOpE3.jpg

 

2. Battle of Buna-Gona / Battle of Wau / Battle of Bismarck Sea  - November 1942 - March 1943  

Siege of Buna-Gona followed the conclusion of the Kokoda Track campaign and lasted from 16 November 1942 until 22 January 1943. The battle was conducted by both Australian and United States soldiers against the Japanese positions at Buna, Sanananda and Gona. 

 

When defense of Buna-Gona came to its conclusion, another operations were started, far in the north. On January 29 started Battle of Wau, where Japanese soldiers sailed from Rabaul and crossed the Solomon Sea and, despite Allied air attacks, successfully reached Lae, where they disembarked. Japanese troops then advanced overland on Wau, an Australian base that potentially threatened the Japanese positions at Salamaua and Lae. A race developed between the Japanese moving overland, hampered by the terrain, and the Australians, moving by air, hampered by the weather. By the time the Japanese reached the Wau area after a trek over the mountains, the Australian defenders had been greatly reinforced by air. In the battle that followed, despite achieving tactical surprise by approaching from an unexpected direction, the Japanese attackers were however unable to capture Wau.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkJKQN15YqI

 

Last stage of this was Battle of Bismarck Sea when aircraft of the U.S. Fifth Air Force and the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) attacked a Japanese convoy carrying troops to Lae, New Guinea.

The Japanese convoy was a result of a Japanese Imperial General Headquarters decision in December 1942 to reinforce their position in the South West Pacific. A plan was devised to move some 6,900 troops from Rabaul directly to Lae. The plan was understood to be risky, because Allied air power in the area was strong, but it was decided to proceed because otherwise the troops would have to be landed a considerable distance away and march through inhospitable swamp, mountain and jungle terrain without roads before reaching their destination. On 28 February 1943, the convoy – comprising eight destroyers and eight troop transports with an escort of approximately 100 fighters – set out from Simpson Harbour in Rabaul.


The Allies had detected preparations for the convoy, and naval codebreakers in Melbourne (FRUMEL) and Washington, D.C., had decrypted and translated messages indicating the convoy’s intended destination and date of arrival. The Allied Air Forces had developed new techniques they hoped would improve the chances of successful air attack on ships. They detected and shadowed the convoy, which came under sustained air attack on 2–3 March 1943. 
 

 

3. Campaign to recapture Lae-Salamaua - April - September 1943 

 

Australian and United States forces sought to capture two major Japanese bases, one in the town of Lae, and another one at Salamaua, for a long time. The campaign to take the Salamaua and Lae area began after the successful defence of Wau in late January, which was followed up by an Australian advance towards Mubo as the Japanese troops that had attacked Wau. A series of actions followed over the course of several months as the Australian 3rd Division advanced north-east towards Salamaua. After an amphibious landing at Nassau Bay, the Australians were reinforced by a US regimental combat team, which subsequently advanced north up the coast. As the Allies kept up the pressure on the Japanese around Salamaua, in early September they launched an airborne assault on Nadzab, and a seaborne landing near Lae, subsequently taking the town with simultaneous drives from the east and north-west. As the situation around Lae grew more desperate, the Salamaua garrison withdrew, and it was captured on 11 September 1943, while Lae fell shortly afterwards on 16 September, bringing the campaign to an end.

 

 

4. Finisterre Range campaign / Huon Peninsula campaign and Battle of Arawe - September 1943 to March 1944

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qonz6iq1U8w

 

Markham and Ramu Valley – Finisterre Range campaign began with an Allied offensive in the Ramu Valley, from 19 September 1943, and concluded when Allied troops entered Madang on 24 April 1944. During the campaign, Australian forces – supported by Australian and US aircraft – advanced through the Markham and Ramu Valleys during which there were minor clashes with Japanese forces, which withdrew towards their main defensive line in the Finisterre Range. The central geographical and strategic feature of the campaign was the imposing Shaggy Ridge, running north-south in the Finisterres; this was the scene of a climatic battle during which the Australians assaulted the Japanese positions in December 1943 and January 1944. Following the fighting around Shaggy Ridge, the Japanese withdrew towards the northern coast of New Guinea, where they were pursued by Australian and US forces advancing through the Finisterres and along the coast from Saidor. The Japanese eventually withdrew to Wewak.

 

 

Last stage would be the first step of campaign to control New Britain. First objective was to capture Arawe. The battle formed part of the Allied Operation Cartwheel, and had the objective of serving as a diversion before a larger landing at Cape Gloucester in late December 1943. The Japanese military was expecting an Allied offensive in western New Britain, and was reinforcing the region at the time of the Allied landing in the Arawe area on 15 December 1943.  

 

Initial Allied goals for the landing at Arawe included securing a base for American PT boats and diverting Japanese forces away from Cape Gloucester. The PT boat base was subsequently deemed unnecessary and was never built. Only a small Japanese force was stationed at Arawe at the time, although reinforcements were en route. The main Allied landing on 15 December was successful, despite a failed subsidiary landing and problems coordinating the landing craft. American forces quickly secured a beachhead and dug in. Japanese air units made large-scale raids against the Arawe area in the days after the landing, and in late December Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) troops unsuccessfully counterattacked the American force. In mid-January 1944 the American force, reinforced with additional infantry and tanks, launched a brief offensive that pushed the Japanese back. The Japanese units at Arawe withdrew from the area towards the end of February as part of a general retreat from western New Britain.

 

 

Planeset

Japanese                                 Allied

Nakajima Ki-43-II                 -   Lockheed P-38 F-5-LO
Kawasaki Ki-61-I                  -   Republic P-47 D-2-RE Model
Aichi D3A2 model  22           -  Bristol Beaufighter Mark Ic
Mitsubishi G4M1 model 12   -  North American B-25 C
 
W7qY2d.jpg
 
p-47d-thunderbolt-fiery-ginger-col-neel-
 
Premium 
 

 

Mitsubishi A6M2 model 21    -  CAC-13 Boomerang 
XZhEvL.jpg
 
Boomerang_4sqn_(AWM_PO2531.013).jpg
 
Opportunity for the ships 
 
Following the losses at the Battle of the Bismarck Sea the Japanese began employing small vessels, including fishing boats, to help supply bases on the north and northeast coast of New Guinea.  During the Finschhafen campaign in Dec. 1943, fishing boats at Hansa Bay were employed to bring supplies west along the coast to the Japanese Army trapped at Sio.   The story is mentioned in Southern Cross, an account of the New Guinea campaigns written by the Chief of Staff of the 18th Army, Lieutenant General Yoshihara Kane.
"Hereupon, as an emergency measure, the Army began to use auxiliary fishing boats from Hansa for transport round the coast of New Guinea; from Hansa, via Karka, Bagubagu, Long the transport began and so a direct supply line to Sio was established.
 
This daring transport was conspicuously successful and brought great rejoicing to the officers and men of 20th Division. It was amazing the courageous deeds these fishing feats [fleets?] did in the skillful hands of the shipping engineers. With no training, no equipment the captains and crews of these fishing posts braved the front line of the fighting and all the dangerous places, saying, "We are immortal. Bring on your arrows or your guns." When attacked by enemy aircraft, they bravely engaged them and miraculously shot them down. However, this secret transport did not long remain hidden from enemy eyes. With the passage of time they were spotted, and their bases were demolished by bombing and the transport unfortunately ceased."
 
ghMLLGg.jpg
 
Furthermore the operations on Bismarck sea and Solomon Sea involved various kinds of fleet movements, starting from convoys with supplies for Japanese and Allies, naval landing fleets, which of course require crafts like LCT, LST and all kinds of other landing crafts. And all those would require an escort ships, including destroyers, cruisers and smaller carriers like IJN Hiyō. This of course would be a step toward major naval battles.
 
 
To sum up, Battle for New Guinea is a proposition for an expansion that would feature various kinds of land, sea and air operations in unique environment and landscape. 
Edited by =LD=Hiromachi
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Move the Boomerang to a primary slot and put a Wildcat in as a premium. Devs will make a killing selling Zero's and Wildcats as premiums.

  • Upvote 5

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I vote for Il-2 Sturmovik: Battle of Hiromachi - a $150 pack with all the maps and aircraft proposed in these very entertaining and informational threads. Keep it up :)

  • Upvote 5

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Move the Boomerang to a primary slot and put a Wildcat in as a premium. Devs will make a killing selling Zero's and Wildcats as premiums.

Not sure about that. There were really no Wildcats in the area since ... March 1942. And to move Boomerang I would have to get rid of P-47 or P-38, either of these was a backbone of Allied air offensive. Unless we would drop Beaufighter and assume Boomerang is purely a ground attacker :/

 

 

I vote for Il-2 Sturmovik: Battle of Hiromachi - a $150 pack with all the maps and aircraft proposed in these very entertaining and informational threads. Keep it up :)

Thanks, I really appreciate that. I just happen to like writing and doing this things, even if we cant have all of them, its still lot of fun to think what we may get :)

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I vote for Il-2 Sturmovik: Battle of Hiromachi - a $150 pack with all the maps and aircraft proposed in these very entertaining and informational threads. Keep it up :)

 

I'd go for that! :salute:

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B-26 is much more interesting than B-25, imho. We must get proper Marauder in sims finally.

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My proposal

 

 

 

1st Release covering 1942 - Oct 1943:

 


IJN/IJA

  •  
  • A6M2-N-Mod 2
  • A6M2 Mod 11
  • Ki-43-II KAI
  • D3A2  Mod 22  (Mod 12 was only a test bed and failed range tests)
  • Ki-49-IIa
  • G4M1 Mod 11
  • Ki-45-KAIc
  • Ki-61-I HEI
  • Ki-84-I Ko  (SPECIAL A/C SET)


RNZAF/RAAF

  • P-40E-1
  • P-39D-2
  • SBD-3
  • Blenheim IV
  • Beaufighter Mk IIF
  • CAC-12
  • Hurricane Mk.II
  • A-20
  • Spitfire Mk.VC (SPECIAL A/C SET)
  • Upvote 2

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I like how you made sure that no aircraft intersect with Burma, thus keeping both scenarios viable. If the next expansions were Kuban, New Guinea then Burma you would have happy campers across the globe.

 

Throw in a map with any stretch of Mediterranean for the Western MP and the mission creators to use with the American, British and German fighters that would be present by then, and the crowds would rejoice from Moscow to Orlando through Tokyo, London and Sydney.

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Not sure about that. There were really no Wildcats in the area since ... March 1942. And to move Boomerang I would have to get rid of P-47 or P-38, either of these was a backbone of Allied air offensive. Unless we would drop Beaufighter and assume Boomerang is purely a ground attacker :/

 

)

There was no reason for the Fw in BOS either but it would be fun and a money maker for the Devs = win/win. It's timeframe appropriate and tangentially appropriate even if it wasn't in the immediate area. The Wildcat would allow mission makers to make pseudo-PTO scenarios as well.

Edited by [LBS]HerrMurf

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OT - This Newsreel from OP post show some know Luftwaffe gun cans shooting at Hurricanes, Spitfires.... as Japaneses planes hit in Bismark Sea.   :wacko:  :P

 

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There was no reason for the Fw in BOS either but it would be fun and a money maker for the Devs = win/win.

That's true. But in BoS we have Novosokolniki/Velikiye Luki area maps, where 190 is on it's place.

So, if someone will do, for example, New Britain and Bougainville, we can have even F4U-1. Sweet "birdcage"...

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B-26 is much more interesting than B-25, imho. We must get proper Marauder in sims finally.

Look at the very first video, B-25s were extremely important in the New Guinea operations. 

 

 

There was no reason for the Fw in BOS either but it would be fun and a money maker for the Devs = win/win. It's timeframe appropriate and tangentially appropriate even if it wasn't in the immediate area. The Wildcat would allow mission makers to make pseudo-PTO scenarios as well.

But it was not a problem from any logistical side or else. Luftwaffe was Luftwaffe, that FW-190 arrived a bit later but same formation could use it. 

 

Wildcat on the other hand was used by Marines and Navy, none of which was present in New Guinea. Last Wildcats visited Lae in March 1942, I was really thinking on that one, but I simply fail to find any place or operation, even remotely close to the given map area.

 

Besides, its still doesnt change that fact that in exchange of what would the Wildcat be taken ? Something would have to be dropped. 

 

 

 

OT - This Newsreel from OP post show some know Luftwaffe gun cans shooting at Hurricanes, Spitfires.... as Japaneses planes hit in Bismark Sea.    

 

Ye, I found quite a few others like that. I guess they simply didnt have enough raw footage from the area, so to show some air combat they took what they had. Makes sense when you think that average US/Australian/British citizen had no idea how to recognize German or Japanese aircraft.  

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Sounds like an excellent idea. I'm a Luftwaffe guy, but i would like a short switch to another theater. And the P-38 in that environment would be perfect :)

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Hiromachi, one question about the early stages of the campaign: weren't the P-47D and the Boomerang only pressed into active service around the summer of 1943? In a campaign setting, would the player then only have AI P-38s going around?

 

I know this isn't necessarily a problem, after all we have P-40Es in Moscow during 1941, endless C.202s un Stalingrad and La-5s occasionally flying in the summer of 1942, but it's interesting to consider it. :)

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Hiromachi, one question about the early stages of the campaign: weren't the P-47D and the Boomerang only pressed into active service around the summer of 1943? In a campaign setting, would the player then only have AI P-38s going around?

That is correct, but as you know campaigns in current Il-2 titles dont take into account that, so its not a problem at all. In old style campaign most likely players would start with P-38s / Oscars / Zeros as early machines and only after specific stage of campaign was reached, new aircraft such as Ki-61 and P-47 would become available. 

 

But indeed, first to arrive on the front with P-47s was 348th Fighter Group in mid-July 1943. According to Americas Hundred Thousand they had also C model, but I did not manage to find any losses of those, but quite a few of various D models, with D-2-RE as earliest one. By August 1943 (about a middle of proposed campaign) the number of squadrons equipped with P-47s increased to 3. So hence the choice. 

 

Boomerangs arrived to the units early in 1943 (February and March I believe), but they were moved to action a bit later. RAAF No. 84 Squadron was moved the same month (March) to Horn Island, 150 km south from New Guinea. RAAF No. 4 Squadron was supporting Allied operations for long in New Guinea, and they received first Boomerangs in July 1943, their first major action with new aircraft was support provided in Markham and Ramu valleys. Unit also participated in many other events, for instance interceptions of Betty bombers and so on. 

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Sounds good :)

 

If it's of any consolation players of the Russian market edition would start off with the P-38 or Oscar and have the rest open up as the campaign progresses.

 

Out of curiosity, were there any Airacobras, P-40s or Spitfires over New Guinea? The RAAF operated all, while the USAAF still used the Airacobra and Kittyhawk to some extents in 1942.

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There were squadrons with P-39s and P-40s. Those were the backbone of Allied air resistance throughout 1942 - P-40E, P-39 D and P-400. In 1943 a newer models were introduced, P-40N and P-39N (or Q, I always confuse those various Airacobras). But I sort of wanted to save them since they did not play any crucial role anymore, they would either work great on another front like Kuban or Gudalcanal (Cactus Force). Also, there is already P-40 E. I dont think another Curtiss fighter would be needed for now. 

 

In terms of Spitfires, yes. RAAF No. 79 Squadron was equipped with Spitfire Vc, and they made it to Goodenough Island in May 1943. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No._79_Squadron_RAAF

Edited by =LD=Hiromachi

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Probably P-39N, the P-39Q was introduced closer to 1944 I think.

 

I don't think they need to be in the pack either, but having them as AI aircraft in the campaign (borrowing the P-40 from Moscow and the P-39 from a GPW 1943 expansion) or as player-controlled in multiplayer servers would help flesh things out.

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Thats the thing I am missing from RoF, a small aircraft packages or even single aircraft ones. In between of major expansions it would be nice to get a small packs containing 1-2 aircraft. That way one could fill any existing gaps.  

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It would definitely be cool to have that, and I'm betting this will come once most major aircraft types are out there. Their reasoning for not doing it right now is probably because as things are today a lot still intersects with different theatres. For example, a P-39D-N can go in any expansion from Pacific 1942 to Eastern Front or MTO 1943/4, same for many P-40 variants. Once we have the major types used by the Soviet Union, Japan, Germany, Commonwealth nations, USA and Italy down between 1941,and 1943/4, it becomes easier to pepper the set with minor additions and variants.

 

For example, once you have the Japanese bombers and attackers for 1941/2, you can add an early P-40, I-16 and a Buffalo for the Allied side, with a Ki-27 and other Japanese contemporary fighters (whose name I embarrassingly forgot) with two maps simulating Khalkhin-Gol and the 1941 Japanese offensive in Eastern Asia. Although if you throw an SB, R-Z and another two Japanese aircraft in, you have a full expansion which becomes a stepping stone for both Finland and multiple Far Eastern scenarios.

 

Eh, dreaming is hard :biggrin:

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First one is obviously cool. But latter one not much, that's not gonna happen due to how quick the campaign was and how unbalanced it would be for a game scenario. 

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Boomerang was a fairly minor player. 250 total production. I love my Australian brothers but they flew way more and more effectively in other types. I wouldn't expect this AC until pretty far down the road. I'd love for the guys who want it to have it eventually.

 

P-47 had short legs and not terribly effective in the theater. The P-40 and even the Spitfire are better initial offerings for New Guinea. The Spit would have broader appeal while the Devs are trying to grow the game and player base. Plus you could drop it into non-historical scenarios and have them face off against Bf109's. (Doesn't look like Vc's operated in Russia but I could be wrong.) So for me, Spit over my Yankee Thud and import the P-40 from BoM/BoS.

 

Still think, if you are gonna offer the Zero as a premium you gotta have the Wildcat as the counter. It might not match the geography but it will attract players and pay for itself (and lots of other stuff too) in short order.

 

Gotta think outside of the box, er, theater on this one. I'm more concerned with fun, player base and paying our dear Devs than an absolutely strict plane set. Map makers can limit which AC are used for true historical servers.

 

I like most of the AC list. Japanese side is perfect.

Edited by [LBS]HerrMurf

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@ something was wrong with big map, I've fixed that now. You may take a look now at it in a full scale.

 

 

 

Boomerang was a fairly minor player. 250 total production. I love my Australian brothers but they flew way more and more effectively in other types. I wouldn't expect this AC until pretty far down the road. I'd love for the guys who want it to have it eventually.

Yeah, but its unique. Premium aircraft doesnt have to be most present (FW-190 ? Mc.202 with only few examples) in the area, most numerous in production nor best performer. It can be a fine attachement to the whole setup. There is no better chance to add Boomerang than in this scenario, due to fact that it wasnt present in larger numbers anywhere else. There was a Squadron at Bougainville with them I believe and they were in few other places, but New Guinea was really that place. Reading through various memoirs of Allied soldiers, one could feel the relief when they got support from Boomerangs.

 

And as you pointed, its Australian. This setup gives 3 American warbirds, 1 British and 1 Australian. Boomerang as a premium is not necessary to play the expansion. I would buy it for sure, but there are some who skipped P-40 or Mc 202 in BoM and some who skipped La-5 in BoS. Besides, I still think that Boomerang may surprise quite a few people with its features. 

 

 

 

HerrMurf' timestamp='1464278530' post='360498'] P-47 had short legs and not terribly effective in the theater. The P-40 and even the Spitfire are better initial offerings for New Guinea. The Spit would have broader appeal while the Devs are trying to grow the game and player base. Plus you could drop it into non-historical scenarios and have them face off against Bf109's. (Doesn't look like Vc's operated in Russia but I could be wrong.) So for me, Spit over my Yankee Thud and import the P-40 from BoM/BoS.

P-47 had quite a bit of range considering its ability to escort bombers over Europe. And its presence was really major in the theater, since by the beginning of 1944 four squadrons were flying the P-38 and no fewer than 11 squadrons were equipped with the P-47. 

I can only recommend you reading this to see that aircraft was always in the action from the moment of introduction to the theater :

 

http://www.j-aircraft.com/research/rdunn/tuluvu/tuluvu_main.htm

 

The P-40 is already there. Adding N model instead of E wont really make huge difference so I really didnt consider that as an aircraft for the setup. And as I explained to Lucas, Spitfire was present in the area but on Goodenough Island. That's 200 km away from Buna - Gona.

 

 

The squadron completed its movement to Goodenough Island on 26 June and began flying air defence sorties from Vivigani Airfield as part of No. 73 Wing. It did not intercept any Japanese aircraft while operating from this base, however. The squadron moved to Kirwina Airfield on Kiriwina between 9 and 18 August, from where it operated alongside the P-40 Kittyhawk-equipped No. 76 Squadron. This was the closest Allied airfield to the major Japanese base at Rabaul and was expected to be regularly attacked. No Japanese raids were made on the airfield during the first weeks of the squadron's deployment there, however, and its pilots were disappointed to not see combat while conducting patrols in support of United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) raids on Rabaul. The Imperial Japanese Army Air Force (IJAAF) began a series of attacks on Goodenough Island and Kiriwina in early October, however, and the squadron claimed its first victory in 31 October when one of its Spitfires shot down a Kawasaki Ki-61 fighter 2 miles (3.2 km) north of Kiriwina (this type of aircraft was labelled the "Tony" by the Allies).
 

After a period of training, No. 79 Squadron flew its first sweep over Japanese-held territory on 27 November when eight Spitfires were dispatched to Gasmata on New Britain. The next day one of its Spitfires shot down a Mitsubishi Ki-46 "Dinah" reconnaissance aircraft south of Kitava. As few Japanese attacks were made against Kirwina, No. 79 Squadron's pilots became restive. The offensive patrols over New Britain improved their morale, however. Another Ki-61 was intercepted and shot down by a Spitfire on 21 December, and an A6M Mitsubishi A6M "Zero" fighter was destroyed on the ground at Gasmata seven days later. A Spitfire was lost during a patrol over New Britain on 31 December, however.[8] During January and February 1944 the squadron conducted offensive sweeps over New Britain, strafed Japanese positions and escorted Allied bombers. On 17 January, eight No. 79 Squadron Spitfires took part in an attack against a Japanese camp near Lindenhafen which involved 73 Australian aircraft; this was the largest RAAF operation of the war up to that time. Two Spitfires were lost during the operations in January and February.

In early 1944 No. 79 Wing was selected to support the US Army's Admiralty Islands campaign.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No._79_Squadron_RAAF

 

Spitfires did absolutely nothing in the given area. Spitfires fit a lot more Burma or Darwin area (Norther Australia).

 

 

 

Gotta think outside of the box, er, theater on this one. I'm more concerned with fun, player base and paying our dear Devs than an absolutely strict plane set. Map makers can limit which AC are used for true historical servers.

I'm not so concerned with a strict plane set as well, dont get me wrong. But there should be some connection between the aircraft and the game. Besides, I dont think with proposed setup we lack any fun. Neither the player base should be displeased, you have Lightning which has fans around the world. Thunderbolt which is another legend. Ki-61 which is considered one of the most beautiful inline engine powered fighter. B-25, Ki-43, Betty, Val, Beaufighter and damn awesome Boomerang. 

 

Anyway, here is a fine drawing I found an hour ago on facebook : 

13248355_1184270414936943_20829994950518

 

Cant decide which one looks better :)

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Look at the very first video, B-25s were extremely important in the New Guinea operations.

 

But Mitchell is not exclusive at all. Could you give me name of simulator with sophisticated B-26?

And B-26 can get interesting unlocks with "custom-made" fixed M2 on fuselage like it was IRL there, for example.

Of course, it is only my opinion. But we can get B-25 even on Eastern front.

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Late model 47 had legs, yes but not in your timeframe. Certainly not the C or early D models. They were rather infamous in that department. Commanders were scrambling for P-38's not P-47's.

 

And I think you misunderstood me on the P-40. I just want it ported over and repainted not replacing anything in your list. Spitfire is tangentially present like the Fw in BoS.

 

I'm not giving up on the chubby F4F. You just can't have an initial foray into the Pacific without her and maybe an escort carrier who got lost on the way to some other island outpost.

 

I like the painting and totally support you on the B-25 issue.  :)

Edited by [LBS]HerrMurf

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http://www.joebaugher.com/usaf_fighters/p47_3.html

 

 

 

Fuel capacity - 300 gal. Range at maximum cruise power was 640 miles at 335 mph at 10,000 feet. Range with a 166.5 Imp. gall. drop tank was 1250 miles at 10,000 feet at 231 mph.

 

http://www.joebaugher.com/usaf_fighters/p47_4.html

 

 

D-15 – More fuel capacity, 370 Gallons.

Range was 950 miles at 10,000 feet. Range with maximum external fuel was 1800 miles at 10,000 feet at 195 mph. 

 

At worst its range of 640 miles clean. 

 

Map is 400 km long, you can make it from the very bottom to the very top and then come back, and you still will have fuel left. Really dont think range here is any concern. Though I'm sure we should get the external fuel tanks with such Expansion. 

 

 

 

I'm not giving up on the chubby F4F. You just can't have an initial foray into the Pacific without her and maybe an escort carrier who got lost on the way to some other island outpost.

Dont get me wrong. I really like F4F, just dont find it necessary exactly here. And even if included along with aircraft carrier, than what of it ? Because point of every aircraft carrier is to project maximum damage over a given target. And for that you need torpedo squadrons and dive bomber squadrons. 

Edited by =LD=Hiromachi
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Any pacific scenario (preferrably naval ops) is welcome from my side. If the Beaufighter was to be exchanged for a SBD I'd say it's very well balanced but I see the reasons for including it. Love the Val so I don't mind it too much, though.

 

PS: I think this would be a better contender for the Beaufighter:

Q1W Tokai

q1w-12.jpg

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If the Beaufighter was to be exchanged for a SBD I'd say it's very well balanced but I see the reasons for including it. Love the Val so I don't mind it too much, though.

 

That's not possible really. The only Dauntless used by Army was A-24 but those vanished from the area by mid 1942, aircraft was found to be obsolete or at least inadequate for the duties due to massive losses A-24s suffered. Dautless though was used in Solomon island quite extensively. But for anti-ship role in this area Beaufighter was assigned, RAAF had quite a few of them.  

 

Also, its never going to be balanced due to sheer firepower of allied fighters. But point is that its Allies job to prevent all those tankers, oilers, transports and other stuff to reach Japanese bases. Japanese on the other hand have to prevent landings which calls for some attackers, which they really didnt have. Navy used big formations of Vals flying from Rabaul and often stopping and Cape Gloucester. I kinda hoped for a Judy, but could find any there really. Other option would be B5N, but for torpedo runs there is already G4M1. And with radar, a torpedo runs at night should be possible as well. 

 

It's true that planeset is asymmetric, but such was the reality there. 

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The SBD did appear in one of the videos you posted with the battle of the Bismarck sea so thats why I though it may be viable. Not trying to say I don't like assymetric planesets, infact I support more variety over balance, but thats just the plan devs have to make it viable financily and gameplay wise.

 

Anyway, you got my support :)

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https://www.facebook.com/Legend-Flyers-255443124472131/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1385292671487165

 

Wasn't sure where exactly put it so figured this is as good as any other place since its related. Here is an album containing lots of pictures from Skyfair 2016 exhibition in which flew Zero, Oscar, Hellcat, Wildcat, Dauntless and so on. Pictures are in a high quality and anyone should find them enjoyable. 

 

Videos of course are also available: 
 

 

 

S!

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This game could have one hell of a storefront, like RoF. I see quite a few Spotter and Recon planes!!!!


41 planes at $5.00 - $10.00ea can surely provide for some development money. Images from the book 'Whispering Death-Australian Airmen in the Pacific War' By: Mark Johnston.

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post-12904-0-40296300-1471233884_thumb.jpg

post-12904-0-95497800-1471233891_thumb.jpg

post-12904-0-75197400-1471233901_thumb.jpg

Edited by II./ZG1=SPEKTRE76

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Recon machines have their role, sleek Ki-46 or P-38 F-4 would not only be interesting to have but also a simple challenge to intercept as they were really fast. 

 

@Spektre Speaking of books, I highly recommend this one: http://irandpcorp.com/products/43bg1/ If you are a bomber fun then history of 43rd Bombardment Group is something truly worth reading, 

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Did anyone happen to mention the pillicks at Northrop-Grumman?

 

I believe they like to play hard ball about things like the Wildcat etc.

 

Or am I wrong?

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Did anyone happen to mention the pillicks at Northrop-Grumman?

 

I believe they like to play hard ball about things like the Wildcat etc.

 

Or am I wrong?

Discussed elsewhere at length. It shouldn't be a problem.

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This game could have one hell of a storefront, like RoF. I see quite a few Spotter and Recon planes!!!!

41 planes at $5.00 - $10.00ea can surely provide for some development money.

I'm surprised. Where is B-26 profile? 22nd BG had it in New Guinea. Edited by MicroShket

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I'm surprised. Where is B-26 profile? 22nd BG had it in New Guinea.

Those pictures are only showing aircraft operated in New Guinea by Australia and Japan.

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