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Pseudocatz

Combat Fatigue in WW2 Dogfights.

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Hello, this is my first time starting a thread.

 

First of all, I welcome the improvement of pilot physiology in game, as mentioned in the latest DD. I hope the modeling of endurance and fatigue will also affect AI pilots behavior.

 

Since I am now primarily plays offline, I am mostly play career mode or scripted mission. As you know, CAP and escort missions often became endless series of dogfight carousels until one side is annihilated, because AI pilots (friendlies and enemies) would just go after each other until the sky is clear of hostile objects.

 

As the only human in the verse, I feel drained after a few prolonged tangles. Drenched in sweat and adrenaline, I often found myself running back home even though I know still had a little bit of ammo and the rest of my squadron are still fighting the enemy (but I always tried to stay around to finish the mission). I was just too tired mentally and physically.

Which made me wonder, is it often for fighter pilots in WW2, to decide to RTB (assuming it is tactically possible) when their body and mind just couldn't survive another dogfight in anymore? Is it considered as an act cowardice, even if they completed their objectives an, say, had confirmed to have shot down a couple of enemy fighters in the process?

 

Thank you for your answer.

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36 minutes ago, Pseudocatz said:

Hello, this is my first time starting a thread.

 

First of all, I welcome the improvement of pilot physiology in game, as mentioned in the latest DD. I hope the modeling of endurance and fatigue will also affect AI pilots behavior.

 

Since I am now primarily plays offline, I am mostly play career mode or scripted mission. As you know, CAP and escort missions often became endless series of dogfight carousels until one side is annihilated, because AI pilots (friendlies and enemies) would just go after each other until the sky is clear of hostile objects.

 

As the only human in the verse, I feel drained after a few prolonged tangles. Drenched in sweat and adrenaline, I often found myself running back home even though I know still had a little bit of ammo and the rest of my squadron are still fighting the enemy (but I always tried to stay around to finish the mission). I was just too tired mentally and physically.

Which made me wonder, is it often for fighter pilots in WW2, to decide to RTB (assuming it is tactically possible) when their body and mind just couldn't survive another dogfight in anymore? Is it considered as an act cowardice, even if they completed their objectives an, say, had confirmed to have shot down a couple of enemy fighters in the process?

 

Thank you for your answer.

From my reading, pilots often found themselves separated from their fellows after a fur ball and made their way home separately, forming up with other friendlies of just beelining home. Few people hang around enemy territory all by their lonesome. If you abandoned a wingman or turned for home without being chased then there would be hell to pay I imagine. But if you found yourself separated and surrounded by enemies, and exhausted to boot, few would blame you for bugging out.

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Hi Catz,

 

good question! I've read accounts as Red has said above of after only a few confusing seconds of dogfighting pilots finding themselves seperated, alone and without another plane to be seen therefore opting to RTB and living to fight another day.

 

cheers 

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Ah yes, I forgot those pilots cannot turn the markers on and off. 

 

Also, I guess if you know that a person you personally know and trust are in danger, you'll make extra efforts to find and helps them. Those AI pilots are just a series of 1 and 0, so we just cannot be bothered the same way as real WW2 pilots.

 

 

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