Jump to content

Ford Merlin . . . Not


cardboard_killer
 Share

Recommended Posts

cardboard_killer

"18-Oct-1939 The French Air Ministry abandons the idea of a Rolls Royce Merlin powered Dewoitine-520. Designated the De-521, one prototype was built with a Merlin-III engine and it demonstrated superior rate of climb and exceptional high altitude performance. With British-built Merlin production struggling to meet RAF demands, contracts were signed earlier in the year with Rolls Royce, the French government, and Ford Air to produce license built Merlins. This was put on hold under the US Neutrality Laws once France went to war. Now that the Neutrality Act has been amended, Henry Ford has declared that even though sales of license built Merlins would be legal, his company will be neutral in the European War. He refuses to deliver the Detroit built tools and jigs and brings the American technicians at Ford Air’s French plant home. A shortage of Hispano-Suiza engines is delaying production of the De-520.

 

- Ford will again sign a contract to build license built Merlins in June, 1940 for the US Army Air Corps. A fervent isolationist, Ford will back out of the deal when he finds out that some of the production will go to the UK, saying that Ford will only produce “for defense, not for Britain”.

- Defense Commissioner William Knudsen (who happens to be a former Chairman of General Motors) will negotiate with Rolls-Royce and the $130 million contract will go to the Packard Motor Company."

 

2 minutes ago, cardboard_killer said:

A fervent isolationist, Ford . . .

 

Some might say a Nazi sympathizer due to his profound antisemitism.

Edited by cardboard_killer
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
cardboard_killer

[80 years ago today] "• Packard begins building license-copies of the Rolls Royce Merlin engine for American and Allied aircraft. The contract was originally with Ford but Henry Ford balked as the terms included providing some of the engines to Britain. Packard will build more than 55,000 Merlins. "

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...