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Arfsix

Split Screen View fo Complex Engine Management

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     This was originally posted in Suggestions. I am posting here to generate discussion. Please comment.

 

Type of improvement:   Graphics and ease of use

Explanation of proposals:     In order to perform complex engine management, you must know and understand engine limitations and settings, have your controls set up (key mapped) to effect engine limitations and settings {open radiators, increase power, etc.}, and observe the relevant instruments. In real life, one does this engine management while maintaining control of the aircraft by observation of the horizon (during visual flight conditions) or using the attitude instruments.

 

     In the Great Battles simulation currently, whether using point of view commands on a joystick button. head tracking software like Track IR, snap views, or VR headset, it is very difficult to show the horizon and panel instruments at the same time  in most of the aircraft because of the limited field of view. If you take too long when checking your panel or looking for an instrument and not referencing the horizon, you may start to turn, dive or climb, or even lose complete attitude awareness and go into a spin!

 

     I would suggest a new and additional view command to help with this problem. This Split Screen View would show the default cockpit view on the left and a snap view of the appropriate instrument on the right side on the screen.

 

 

 

 

 

Dualscreen.thumb.jpg.e5b4b203f0a88d6a5b8bb5b92e2e22a6.jpg

 

 

 

      In the example above, you can see the horizon view (from Pilot head snap position: center, Numpad 5) on the left and the compass (from a preprogramed snap view) on the right. Each side to be centered on a screen  half the width of the current monitors’ screen resolution setting and with each side to be active to be able to see any changes in the instruments or aircraft attitude.

 

     The instrument view on the right would be set up using the mouse and current snap view positioning commands (insert, home, delete, end, page up, and page down) and would be saved with the F10 key command.

 

     At the present time, snap views are labeled by their key commands (keypad 2, keypad decimal, etc.). These new snap views would be labeled by a modifier key plus a keypad key (d + keypad 2 or control key + keypad 8) which would also be the key command to display the split screen view and this would allow two different sets of snap views.

 

     The Split Screen View command should act as a toggle with the split screen view remaining open until the command is repeated under all cockpit and external camera views.

 

 

Benefits:   The Split Screen View will permit greater situational awareness and easier simulator control. Game play will be enhanced and enjoyment by the player increased!

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that is a really nice idea, I like it a lot.

now whether this is technically possible (with the implication that both screens have to be rendered at the same time) is another question. but as a concept, I really like this.

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its meant to be a Sim :D 
not more Arcade than WT 

that being said why in the little screenshot i can read all gauges on your Left Pic.
Should be able to read gauges in your plane at max zoom out. 

 

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1 hour ago, =TBAS=Sschatten14 said:

its meant to be a Sim 😄
not more Arcade than WT 

that being said why in the little screenshot i can read all gauges on your Left Pic.
Should be able to read gauges in your plane at max zoom out. 

 

 

     The split screen view is meant to be used as a means of quickly checking selected instruments (your choice). It is not intended to replace the normal forward cockpit view. It also allows you to zoom in (magnify) on instruments that can be difficult to read in the normal forward cockpit view without losing sight of the horizon (just like real pilots do)!     :)

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Too obtrusive. 👎

I don’t think any player would give up 50% of their screen to see the dashboard. You can just see your gauges from the normal cockpit view. There’s also technochat. 

Edited by SharpeXB

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to be 100% honest, if you're taking you time looking at gauges in the cockpit, you aren't fighting. i'm gonna say a soft no on the snap views for gauges. besides the icons tell you about critical engine management and you can even hear it on most aircraft 

Edited by gimpy117

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You can actually set up snap view already to look at gauges. The I-16 there might justify doing that. With head tracking you can sorta lean down to see them. 

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2 hours ago, SharpeXB said:

You can actually set up snap view already to look at gauges. The I-16 there might justify doing that. With head tracking you can sorta lean down to see them. 

     I have snap views set up to be able to see single instruments (enlarged and easier to read quickly) and I use TrackIR for viewing. However, it is very easy to lose the horizon (and attitude awareness with loss of control) when leaning forward to scan the instruments!

:joy:

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With these aircraft, you don‘t fly „by instruments“ anyway (unless you absolutely have to) but by looking outside. Looking outside gives you correct attitude for horizontal flight, climb, etc. You set your power then you know your speed and that‘s it until you touch the throttle again. The engine tells you with noises, vibration (& smoke &fire) what the status is. The steam gauges just indicate your current reasonable degree of hope. Besides for todays standards, the arrangement is terrible and they are semi legible compared to what you are used as instrumentation from the 1960‘s on.

 

Even in the Spitfire, just look outside and feel the aircraft. It must be a nightmare to fly her by instruments as just a slight touch on the stick can give you the best you can milk from a Cessna 172. And you‘re always late with your reactions.

 

Same as driving old timer cars. You may frequently check oil pressure and water temps but mainly you‘d be looking outside. Drive an old timer in todays traffic and you‘ll know what i mean by that. It‘s nothing like a Tesla that keeps the drivers distracted mind glued on a screen and lets him get away with it.

 

Really, looking down there to those dark steam gauges AND expecting any useful way to gauge the planes precise attitude... „would totally kill the immersion“. ;)

 

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     The whole point or question of the exercise being; How do you set your power, check your temperatures, or other complex engine management actions without the aircraft deviating from course and altitude?

:pilot: 

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You gotta be fast. ;) Also, complex engine mamagement in those aircraft doesn't mean that you have to do something all the time. You set it once to recommended settings (and you can do so almost without looking at the levers) and then you watch outside, flying the aircraft. In case you really have to chek down there because you think something is getting fishy, yes the plane will most likely deviate from the flight attitude, especially planes with neutral stability. I certainly couldn't hold her totally straight when trying to fly her by the gauges. If you are compelled to doctoring around down there, I this doubt you'd be able to fly your aircarft absolutely straight. In a Cessna, you trim her right and then you have all the time in the world to marvel at your gauges and work the controls. In the Spit, you just gained/lost 200 ft by quickly checking your compass on the floor and touching your stick in process. But if turn&bank is basically all you have in a cloud between you and impact, you have an interesting time for sure. It's possible to live through that, certainly. But it would be one of my lesser choices.

 

They tell you a couple of things when you fly a Spit, but the most useful oneI found is really "look outside" when flying her. It's not a bookkeepers aircraft. And I doubt most of those fighters were. The Mustang has a far nicer and more practical working space. It's definitely far superior for going places. The Spit is grad for an airshow at your local airport if I was to sum up some best use cases for the two. The I-16 is abysmal regarding creature comfort. You having your head outside is probably al the instrumentation required for flying. No wonder they hid the rest under the dash.

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I fly with all help off, including heading, and I don't have any trouble just popping down to view the gauges every now and then. Get it into your situational awareness routine, e.g. scan all sectors of the sky then, a quick look at the gauges, and repeat. There's only ever two or three that you really need to concentrate on, the rest can have a more casual check. If you spend too long looking at them then yes, you're more likely to lose orientation and worse, get yourself bounced. You don't even need to see the hidden compass (I-16, Spit, early Il-2) very often. Get your course set then aim at a point ahead on the ground, or a suitable cloud. I'd be surprised if I checked the compass more than once very two minutes.

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9 hours ago, Arfsix said:

     The whole point or question of the exercise being; How do you set your power, check your temperatures, or other complex engine management actions without the aircraft deviating from course and altitude?

First be trimmed

Then just don’t zoom view so far in to look at the gauges.

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