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A question to pilots and engineers regarding stalls and wing drop

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I have a question for pilots and engineers on this forum regarding the title.

 

Question: Do all airplanes drop a wing during a turning stall? My understanding was the wing drop during turns occurs even in torque-less aircraft due to the wings having different stall points due to airflow differences since the wings are banked? I have noticed in some simulators (not il2) that certain aircraft (without computer control) are sometimes modeled has having no wing drop during a turning stall. Instead, they sort of....sink sideways out the sky. Is this real? or a modeling error?

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Many factors cause this - read this that is a rather decent simplified explanation :

 

https://www.flitetest.com/articles/what-are-tip-stalls-how-do-they-form

 

But similar aircraft can behave very differently in this domain - and it is one of the major contributors that make some planes "nasty to fly"... I remember as a young laddie when I flew my first glasfiber gilder - an LS1-f. That plane had nasty behavior where it almost did a half roll when stalling in a turn, sometimes in the other direction than you where turning... And very little warning before it "snapped"....

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On 8/16/2019 at 4:44 PM, Lord_Flashheart said:

Question: Do all airplanes drop a wing during a turning stall?

 

Answer: No.

 

Stalling on one wing (which is just a spin or a snap roll) will occur with an unbalanced lift/airflow on the wings. If the airflow/relative wind is perfectly (or almost) symmetric, both wings will stall in the same time and same rate. Of course it depends on how sensible the aircraft is with a dissymmetric relative wind.

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As you often use a bit of bottom rudder during a turn, this might be enough to cause an asymmetric stall but depending on the design and a whole host of factors the answer will be very situation dependent.

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