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TFS 5.0 Regia Marina "Gorizia" - Heavy Cruiser - WIP

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RM Gorozia 3.png

RM Gorozia 4.png

RM Gorozia 5.png

RM Gorozia1.png

RM Gorozia2.png

 

Some notes:

 

This is Work in Progress... Not all the flak emplacements are present in this model... so yes it will be a challenge to attack.

Anyone who thinks they can fly a single aircraft, at low level, straight at a large warship such as this, will have a nasty surprise.

Trying to skip bomb a large warship is not a good way to extend one's lifetime.

Taking out a major warship such as this takes teamwork and multiple aircraft.

For example, there were approx. 15 Swordfish involved in each of the two attacks which crippled the Bismarck. The attacks were coordinated with aircraft approaching from all directions. Most of the Swordfish let their torpedoes go at the recommended distance of 1000 yards, (914 meters) a couple at twice that distance. There was heavy overcast, and the Swordfish, (which had radar) were able to drop out of the overcast, make their attacks and then climb back into it to avoid the AAA. (yes we hope to have full overcast cloud systems for TF 5.0)

This was in an environment of either complete dark, (for the first attack) or deep twilight. (for the second attack) The Swordfish were launched and landed in either near or complete darkness... something no other carrier borne aircraft would attempt or be normally capable of... the Swordfish had an incredibly low stall speed and easy handling which allowed this.

When the Prince of Wales and Repulse were sunk by the Japanese, they were attacked by an estimated 88 aircraft, 34 torpedo aircraft and 51 level bombers in a number of waves and using 'hammer and anvil' multi directional attacks. The Japanese aircraft were Bettys and Nells, medium bombers, of which half were modified to carry torpedoes. (similar to the modified He-111H-6 and modified Wellington IC's which will carry torpedoes for TF 5.0) The Japanese attacks were spread out over 2 1/4 hours. The effective damage was mostly done by torpedoes in coordinated attacks launched at around 1000 meters. After the Prince of Wales was crippled and slowed, it was hit by some level bombs. Approx. 49 torpedoes were launched, an estimated 6-8 hits. The Japanese crews on these aircraft were among the most highly trained of any airforce in the world in these types of attacks.

 

And yes, as mentioned, we hope to have the warships as mannable by players to allow them to control movement and the weapons.

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So... Fairey Swordfish is on the way?

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2 minutes ago, Leifr said:

So... Fairey Swordfish is on the way?

Not for TF 5.0.

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I like the description. If we won't be able to just fly alone or with small group and just perfectly bomb ship from close range, it will be awesome :) Ships should be feared. Now since there will be torpedoes, will AI be able to spot them and maneuver to avoid them? And can you ambush them if weather is bad so they can have problems spotting torpedoes? 

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26 minutes ago, InProgress said:

I like the description. If we won't be able to just fly alone or with small group and just perfectly bomb ship from close range, it will be awesome :) Ships should be feared. Now since there will be torpedoes, will AI be able to spot them and maneuver to avoid them? And can you ambush them if weather is bad so they can have problems spotting torpedoes? 

If a player is able to control the ships as we plan, then that player would be able to go to full speed and maneuver to avoid torpedoes.

 

For non-player controlled AI ships, we would also would like to revise the response to attacks.... right now there are small maneuvers, but we want full avoidance procedures to be implemented for the AI... but this is complicated because we want to avoid collisions with other ships.  Historically as a response to torpedo attacks, ships would typically turn away from the direction of the launched torpedoes and sail parallel to the estimated torpedo running direction... or '...comb the tracks'... hoping the torpedoes would pass on either side.  However in the case of 'hammer and anvil' type attacks, where the torpedoes are launched from two directions, where the torpedoes are running at right angles to each other, then if a ship turns to 'comb' one set of torpedoes, it exposes its side to the other set.

 

Regarding spotting torpedoes in bad weather... not sure we can implement that for the AI... obviously the human player will have more problems in seeing torpedo tracks in bad weather.

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1 hour ago, Leifr said:

So... Fairey Swordfish is on the way?

Torpedoes are.

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Fairey Swordfish did not see a lot of service from land bases in Egypt against the Regia Marina.... mostly they were based on Carriers and land based on the island of Malta.

 

There was some bombing of the Italians at Tobruk by HMS Eagle based Swordfish in late 1940, but there were not a lot of sorties and it didn't have much effect.

 

We don't have Carriers working in the game at this point anyway.  That is not possible if we want to get a release out in any reasonable time frame.

 

We hope to have the Swordfish included in TF 6.0.

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Looks a very impressive ship model, nice to see other assets of the sim given some space in the threads as it is these things that add greatly to the immersion in any game.:cool:

 

I will keep well away from this thing and stay over the desert, I might survive a little longer if I avoid trying to sink something like this, those Swordfish crews were certainly brave, I tip my hat to them and all navy aviators who were tasked with sinking these mighty warships.:drinks:

 

Thank you very much for the update, really appreciated.:salute:

 

Wishing you all the very best, Pete.:biggrin:

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Is there a chance of seeing anything of the Wellington in the near future Pattle?

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Swordfish have luck sometimes.

 



THE SWORDFISH STRIKE IN BOMBA BAY

“This attack, which achieved the phenomenal result of the destruction of four enemy ships with three torpedoes, was brilliantly conceived and most gallantly executed. The dash, initiative and co-operation displayed by the sub-flight concerned are typical of the spirit which animates the Fleet Air Arm squadrons of H.M.S. Eagle under the inspiring leadership of her Commanding Officer."

Thus wrote Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham, K.C.B., D.S.O., Commander-in-Chief Mediterranean Fleet, in a despatch from his flagship, H.M.S. Warspite, to the Secretary of the Admiralty.

The sub-flight belonged to a Swordfish squadron which had disembarked to Dekheila airport when the aircraft-carrier Eagle (Captain A. R. M. Bridge, R.N.) was lying in Alexandria Harbour in August, 1940. After the squadron had been ashore a few days, Air Commodore R. Collishaw, Air Officer Commanding the Western Desert, applied for some torpedo-aircraft to help him deal with enemy shipping off the Libyan coast. He appreciated their potentialities the more because he had himself been a pilot in the Royal Naval Air Service during the last war, and later had served as Wing Commander in H.M.S. Courageous.

One of the squadron observers was accordingly sent as Naval Liaison Officer to Ma'aten Bagush, the headquarters of the Royal Air Force in the Western Desert. Next day three Swordfish followed, accompanied by an aged Victoria aircraft carrying the maintenance ratings and a conglomeration of tool-boxes, chocks, torpedo-gear and spare parts. The R.A.F. officers welcomed the pilots and observers, and the ground staff took the naval mechanics under their wing.

For the first few nights the sub-flight carried out anti-submarine patrols along the coast, without result. At 11 o'clock one evening the pilots were called to the Operations Room and told that the Blenheim dusk reconnaissance over Bomba Bay (between Tobruk and Benghazi) had reported a submarine depot-ship lying in the bay and a submarine heading in from seaward. Here was an ideal target for the torpedoes of the Swordfish. It was decided that the sub-flight should move up to Sidi Barrani next morning, re-fuel there, and await the report of the dawn reconnaissance.

 

Fairey_Swordfish-595x336.jpg

 Early next morning, 22nd August, Captain Oliver Patch, Royal Marines, arrived by air from Dekheila. As the senior officer he took command of the sub-flight, which flew off for Sidi Barrani, armed with torpedoes, at 7 a.m. And here a word of praise must be given to Leading Torpedoman Arthey, who, in the words of one of the pilots, " during a week of blowing sand, had nursed his charges with such loving care that they ran with the smoothness of birds when at length we dropped them."

After 90 minutes' flying, the Swordfish arrived over Sidi Barrani, which looked as though a tornado had passed over it. They succeeded in landing among the bomb craters without mishap. While the aircraft were refuelling, the crews were taken to the "Mess-cum-Ops Room," which one of them described as "a cunningly constructed edifice of petrol tins filled with sand, roofed by a tarpaulin, containing two wooden benches, a collection of camp stools, and an atmosphere of 85 per cent dust, 10 per cent tobacco smoke and 5 per cent air." There they had a breakfast of tinned sausages, with the inevitable baked beans of the desert, and bread liberally covered with marmalade dug out of a 4-lb. tin with the breadknife.
 
The dawn reconnaissance showed that the targets were still in Bomba Bay. At 10.38 a.m. the sub-flight took off again and headed out to sea in V formation, led by Captain Patch.
As his observer and navigator, Captain Patch had Midshipman (A) C. J. Woodley, R.N.V.R., who, although he was suffering from tonsillitis, had insisted on taking part in the raid.

The Swordfish, flying low over the sea, shaped a course 50 miles from the coast, to avoid the attention of any prowling Italian fighters. At 12.30 they turned inshore and, thanks to Midshipman Woodley's accurate navigation, found themselves flying straight into Bomba Bay. They then opened out, fanwise, to about 200 yards. Four miles from the shore, in the centre of the bay, they sighted a large ocean-going submarine, dead ahead of the leader. She was steaming at about two knots on the surface, apparently charging her batteries. The crew's washing was hanging out to dry. Three miles beyond her, at the mouth of a creek known as An-el-Gazala, a cluster of shipping was visible.

As the striking force approached, now flying only 30 feet above the sea, the submarine opened up a vigorous but ineffective fire upon the starboard aircraft with her two .5 machine-guns. The rear guns of the port and starboard aircraft replied. Captain. Patch turned swiftly to starboard, then smartly back to port, and dropped his torpedo from a range of 300 yards.

SeT0cMc.jpg

On seeing the splash of the torpedo those of the submarine's crew who were on deck jumped into the sea. A few seconds later the torpedo hit the submarine amidships, below the conning-tower. There was a loud explosion, followed by a cloud of thick black smoke. The submarine blew up in many pieces. When the smoke had cleared away, only a small part of her stern was visible above the surface.

Captain Patch, having completed his attack, turned out to sea again. The port and starboard aircraft, piloted by Lieutenant (A) J. W. G. Wellham, R.N., and Lieutenant (A) N. A. F. Cheesman, R.N., were now about a mile apart. They flew on towards the vessels lying inshore, which they identified as a depot-ship, a destroyer and another submarine, the destroyer being in the centre. The depot-ship opened fire with a few high-angle guns depressed along the surface. The destroyer joined in with her pom-poms and multiple machine-guns, and the submarine with her .5's. The fire was not concentrated, but a .5 bullet struck the bottom of the port aircraft, without wounding Lieutenant Wellham, however. He was not to discover the damage done to the aircraft until later.

 

The two Swordfish closed the ships. Lieutenant Wellham, with Petty Officer A. H. Marsh as his observer, dropped his torpedo on the starboard beam of the depot-ship. As Lieutenant Cheesman was preparing to attack the submarine his observer, Sub-Lieutenant (A) F. Stovin-Bradford, R.N., noticed that they were over shoal water and, just in time, saved his pilot from leaving the torpedo in the sand. Lieutenant Cheesman was forced to fly in to 350 yards in order to let go in deep water. He could see the torpedo running the full distance until it hit the submarine amidships. She exploded instantly and set fire to the destroyer. Three seconds later Lieutenant Wellham's torpedo hit the depot-ship below the bridge. She began to blaze furiously.

Both Swordfish turned away and headed for the sea, Lieutenant Cheesman making a right-hand circuit of the Italian fighter airfield at Gazala. He and his observer waved triumphantly to the airmen on the ground, but the enemy made no attempt to engage them. Then there was a terrific explosion astern. The magazine of the depot-ship had blown up. The three ships disappeared from sight in a cloud of steam and smoke.


Forty miles from the coast the two Sword-fish sighted an Italian Cant Z 501 flying-boat above them, but it flew on towards Bomba without altering course.
 

CANT_Z501.jpg


Shortly afterwards they made contact with their leader and reached Sidi Barrani at 3 p.m., having flown a total distance of 366 miles. Lieutenant Wellham's aircraft was found to be unserviceable: a bullet had smashed the extension to the main spar and knocked a dent in the petrol tank, fortunately without puncturing it. Lieutenant Wellham returned to Ma'aten Bagush in Captain Patch's aircraft. Midshipman Woodley was confined to sick quarters on completing his duty: apparently it was considered dangerous for him to be out of doors.

Not unnaturally, the Operations Staff remained dubious about the crews' claim to have sunk four ships with three torpedoes, until the photographs of the reconnaissance Blenheim brought complete confirmation. Captain Patch was awarded the D.S.O., and the other pilots and the observers were also decorated.

A few days after the raid the Italian Radio admitted the loss of four warships by "an overwhelming force of torpedo-bombers and motor torpedo-boats."

Bomba-Bay-Attack.jpg

Neat as a pin. In this attack in Bomba Bay, Libya, on 22nd August 1940, a small striking force of Swordfish destroyed four enemy warships with three torpedoes. The submarine heading in from the sea was first to go. The aircraft on the right went on to sink the depot-ship lying at anchor. The second submarine was sunk by the remaining aircraft, and the explosion set fire to the destroyer in the middle.

The Iride submarine, whose presence in Boma was unknown to the Royal Navy, served as a base for Maiali (human torpedoes), who were preparing to attack targets at the port of Alexandria, Egypt.

 

 

Edited by Sokol1

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37 minutes ago, Sokol1 said:

Swordfish have luck sometimes.

 

 

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THE SWORDFISH STRIKE IN BOMBA BAY

“This attack, which achieved the phenomenal result of the destruction of four enemy ships with three torpedoes, was brilliantly conceived and most gallantly executed. The dash, initiative and co-operation displayed by the sub-flight concerned are typical of the spirit which animates the Fleet Air Arm squadrons of H.M.S. Eagle under the inspiring leadership of her Commanding Officer."

Thus wrote Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham, K.C.B., D.S.O., Commander-in-Chief Mediterranean Fleet, in a despatch from his flagship, H.M.S. Warspite, to the Secretary of the Admiralty.

The sub-flight belonged to a Swordfish squadron which had disembarked to Dekheila airport when the aircraft-carrier Eagle (Captain A. R. M. Bridge, R.N.) was lying in Alexandria Harbour in August, 1940. After the squadron had been ashore a few days, Air Commodore R. Collishaw, Air Officer Commanding the Western Desert, applied for some torpedo-aircraft to help him deal with enemy shipping off the Libyan coast. He appreciated their potentialities the more because he had himself been a pilot in the Royal Naval Air Service during the last war, and later had served as Wing Commander in H.M.S. Courageous.

One of the squadron observers was accordingly sent as Naval Liaison Officer to Ma'aten Bagush, the headquarters of the Royal Air Force in the Western Desert. Next day three Swordfish followed, accompanied by an aged Victoria aircraft carrying the maintenance ratings and a conglomeration of tool-boxes, chocks, torpedo-gear and spare parts. The R.A.F. officers welcomed the pilots and observers, and the ground staff took the naval mechanics under their wing.

For the first few nights the sub-flight carried out anti-submarine patrols along the coast, without result. At 11 o'clock one evening the pilots were called to the Operations Room and told that the Blenheim dusk reconnaissance over Bomba Bay (between Tobruk and Benghazi) had reported a submarine depot-ship lying in the bay and a submarine heading in from seaward. Here was an ideal target for the torpedoes of the Swordfish. It was decided that the sub-flight should move up to Sidi Barrani next morning, re-fuel there, and await the report of the dawn reconnaissance.

 

Fairey_Swordfish-595x336.jpg

 Early next morning, 22nd August, Captain Oliver Patch, Royal Marines, arrived by air from Dekheila. As the senior officer he took command of the sub-flight, which flew off for Sidi Barrani, armed with torpedoes, at 7 a.m. And here a word of praise must be given to Leading Torpedoman Arthey, who, in the words of one of the pilots, " during a week of blowing sand, had nursed his charges with such loving care that they ran with the smoothness of birds when at length we dropped them."

After 90 minutes' flying, the Swordfish arrived over Sidi Barrani, which looked as though a tornado had passed over it. They succeeded in landing among the bomb craters without mishap. While the aircraft were refuelling, the crews were taken to the "Mess-cum-Ops Room," which one of them described as "a cunningly constructed edifice of petrol tins filled with sand, roofed by a tarpaulin, containing two wooden benches, a collection of camp stools, and an atmosphere of 85 per cent dust, 10 per cent tobacco smoke and 5 per cent air." There they had a breakfast of tinned sausages, with the inevitable baked beans of the desert, and bread liberally covered with marmalade dug out of a 4-lb. tin with the breadknife.
 
The dawn reconnaissance showed that the targets were still in Bomba Bay. At 10.38 a.m. the sub-flight took off again and headed out to sea in V formation, led by Captain Patch.
As his observer and navigator, Captain Patch had Midshipman (A) C. J. Woodley, R.N.V.R., who, although he was suffering from tonsillitis, had insisted on taking part in the raid.

The Swordfish, flying low over the sea, shaped a course 50 miles from the coast, to avoid the attention of any prowling Italian fighters. At 12.30 they turned inshore and, thanks to Midshipman Woodley's accurate navigation, found themselves flying straight into Bomba Bay. They then opened out, fanwise, to about 200 yards. Four miles from the shore, in the centre of the bay, they sighted a large ocean-going submarine, dead ahead of the leader. She was steaming at about two knots on the surface, apparently charging her batteries. The crew's washing was hanging out to dry. Three miles beyond her, at the mouth of a creek known as An-el-Gazala, a cluster of shipping was visible.

As the striking force approached, now flying only 30 feet above the sea, the submarine opened up a vigorous but ineffective fire upon the starboard aircraft with her two .5 machine-guns. The rear guns of the port and starboard aircraft replied. Captain. Patch turned swiftly to starboard, then smartly back to port, and dropped his torpedo from a range of 300 yards.

SeT0cMc.jpg

On seeing the splash of the torpedo those of the submarine's crew who were on deck jumped into the sea. A few seconds later the torpedo hit the submarine amidships, below the conning-tower. There was a loud explosion, followed by a cloud of thick black smoke. The submarine blew up in many pieces. When the smoke had cleared away, only a small part of her stern was visible above the surface.

Captain Patch, having completed his attack, turned out to sea again. The port and starboard aircraft, piloted by Lieutenant (A) J. W. G. Wellham, R.N., and Lieutenant (A) N. A. F. Cheesman, R.N., were now about a mile apart. They flew on towards the vessels lying inshore, which they identified as a depot-ship, a destroyer and another submarine, the destroyer being in the centre. The depot-ship opened fire with a few high-angle guns depressed along the surface. The destroyer joined in with her pom-poms and multiple machine-guns, and the submarine with her .5's. The fire was not concentrated, but a .5 bullet struck the bottom of the port aircraft, without wounding Lieutenant Wellham, however. He was not to discover the damage done to the aircraft until later.

 

The two Swordfish closed the ships. Lieutenant Wellham, with Petty Officer A. H. Marsh as his observer, dropped his torpedo on the starboard beam of the depot-ship. As Lieutenant Cheesman was preparing to attack the submarine his observer, Sub-Lieutenant (A) F. Stovin-Bradford, R.N., noticed that they were over shoal water and, just in time, saved his pilot from leaving the torpedo in the sand. Lieutenant Cheesman was forced to fly in to 350 yards in order to let go in deep water. He could see the torpedo running the full distance until it hit the submarine amidships. She exploded instantly and set fire to the destroyer. Three seconds later Lieutenant Wellham's torpedo hit the depot-ship below the bridge. She began to blaze furiously.

Both Swordfish turned away and headed for the sea, Lieutenant Cheesman making a right-hand circuit of the Italian fighter airfield at Gazala. He and his observer waved triumphantly to the airmen on the ground, but the enemy made no attempt to engage them. Then there was a terrific explosion astern. The magazine of the depot-ship had blown up. The three ships disappeared from sight in a cloud of steam and smoke.


Forty miles from the coast the two Sword-fish sighted an Italian Cant Z 501 flying-boat above them, but it flew on towards Bomba without altering course.
 

CANT_Z501.jpg


Shortly afterwards they made contact with their leader and reached Sidi Barrani at 3 p.m., having flown a total distance of 366 miles. Lieutenant Wellham's aircraft was found to be unserviceable: a bullet had smashed the extension to the main spar and knocked a dent in the petrol tank, fortunately without puncturing it. Lieutenant Wellham returned to Ma'aten Bagush in Captain Patch's aircraft. Midshipman Woodley was confined to sick quarters on completing his duty: apparently it was considered dangerous for him to be out of doors.

Not unnaturally, the Operations Staff remained dubious about the crews' claim to have sunk four ships with three torpedoes, until the photographs of the reconnaissance Blenheim brought complete confirmation. Captain Patch was awarded the D.S.O., and the other pilots and the observers were also decorated.

A few days after the raid the Italian Radio admitted the loss of four warships by "an overwhelming force of torpedo-bombers and motor torpedo-boats."

Bomba-Bay-Attack.jpg

Neat as a pin. In this attack in Bomba Bay, Libya, on 22nd August 1940, a small striking force of Swordfish destroyed four enemy warships with three torpedoes. The submarine heading in from the sea was first to go. The aircraft on the right went on to sink the depot-ship lying at anchor. The second submarine was sunk by the remaining aircraft, and the explosion set fire to the destroyer in the middle.

The Iride submarine, whose presence in Boma was unknown to the Royal Navy, served as a base for Maiali (human torpedoes), who were preparing to attack targets at the port of Alexandria, Egypt.

 

 

 

This was before the period covered by TF 5.0.... the module starts at the time of Operation Compass in December 1940.

 

Also would require the map to include Alexandria and the airfields there....  if we do an El Alamein expansion then you'll see that area.

 

We're not going to include the Swordfish in TF 5.0.... would mean a minimum six month delay in release.

 

All in good time.

1 hour ago, DD_Arthur said:

Is there a chance of seeing anything of the Wellington in the near future Pattle?

The Wellington IA/IC has the 3D work for the Pilot/Bombardier cockpits and external model complete, we have shown those images a number of times.

 

It is in the queue for import/animation and once that is complete and the FM/DM is finished we will show it in a video update.

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12 hours ago, ATAG_Pattle said:

When the Prince of Wales and Repulse were sunk by the Japanese, they were attacked by an estimated 88 aircraft, 34 torpedo aircraft and 51 level bombers in a number of waves and using 'hammer and anvil' multi directional attacks. The Japanese aircraft were Bettys and Nells, medium bombers, of which half were modified to carry torpedoes. (similar to the modified He-111H-6 and modified Wellington IC's which will carry torpedoes for TF 5.0) The Japanese attacks were spread out over 2 1/4 hours. The effective damage was mostly done by torpedoes in coordinated attacks launched at around 1000 meters. After the Prince of Wales was crippled and slowed, it was hit by some level bombs. Approx. 49 torpedoes were launched, an estimated 6-8 hits. The Japanese crews on these aircraft were among the most highly trained of any airforce in the world in these types of attacks.

I don't see this happening soon like in TF 5.0, or 6.0, but considering the fact that some CloD aircraft like the Spitfire, Blenheim, P-40, and probably others, fought in South East Asia, would a Pacific theater covering some areas be possible?

Assuming:

1. TF 5.0 and TF... are successful.

2. Resources for Japanese planes, weaponry, etc. can be obtained (problem for 1CGS last I heard)

3. IL-2 GBs isn't doing the area of interest by TF

 

With Finland there's the Hurricane, Gladiator, and Blenheim that participated there. Problem is that a 3rd party Finnish team is making a map of it for IL-2 GBs. see here https://www.ler3.fi/kartat/karelia-map2.jpg.

 

I mean, we've seen most of the Pacific, save for the Philippines in IL-2 1946, but not the Mediterranean, BoB, BoF, etc. save for Mods in IL-2 1946.

 I'm more interested in the MTO and early Western Front for Il-2 CloD, than the Pacific. 

 

Cheers.

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TF will not go to the Pacific.  That is not in the cards.

 

We have enough areas to cover in Europe.

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Great for Italian shuffle board on the bow too!

large.jpg

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What was the purpose of the red and white striping? I assume identification to make it easier to identify friend or foe, but of that was the case it would make it easier for the enemy to spot too? 

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In a nutshell MP,  yes for IFF purposes.

 

Germans also did this, depending on the tactical situation or operation the man o war was involved in. Be it with the NSDAP Hakenkreuz on the bow or stern or the painting of Main and secondary turret tops.

Edited by FurphyForum

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Nice!

 

From the last tme I come back to Silent Hunter III. Still good sub sim with GWX 3 + rest mods ;).

 

GuIgmqjm.jpg lUvQQNzm.jpg

 

Eows2XWm.jpg bZ7PDPum.jpg

 

 ooAbdmFm.jpg ZiFdjrNm.jpg

 

okkEZSsm.jpg qVKHUB7m.jpg

Edited by YoYo
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On 8/3/2019 at 10:19 AM, DD_Arthur said:

Is there a chance of seeing anything of the Wellington in the near future Pattle?

 

is?QX8xbhggS2C_Cwlk4UaE7VURxyGtkZhIR5gXuZKJh1I&height=341

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On 8/4/2019 at 5:26 AM, FurphyForum said:

 

Germans also did this, depending on the tactical situation or operation the man o war was involved in. Be it with the NSDAP Hakenkreuz on the bow or stern or the painting of Main and secondary turret tops

Hmm now that you mention it, I wonder how will devs do it with german ships. They won't make uncensored version for sure, blank white circle would look really meh. Black X does not feel right either. I guess BoX "swastika" would be best option.

 

Or this : P3662ndt43dk11.jpg

Edited by InProgress

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11 minutes ago, InProgress said:

Hmm now that you mention it, I wonder how will devs do it with german ships. They won't make uncensored version for sure, blank white circle would look really meh. Black X does not feel right either. I guess BoX "swastika" would be best option.

 

Or this : P3662ndt43dk11.jpg

We will be using black German cross, (same as aircraft wing markings) inside the white circle for German ship markings.... sorry no Swastikas... players can mod for their own skin versions if they want.

 

(we hope to allow players to skin vehicles/ships same as planes)

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Yeah IP... it's certainly is food for thought.  I guess it really does boil down to research,  research and more research.

 

There you go Buzz has answered. :good:

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3 hours ago, InProgress said:

. I guess BoX "swastika" would be best option.

 

 

Bo'X' and DCS fake Sw@stik@s is just ridicule.:negative:

 

Just don't use the "thing" - real or fake, this matter is deadhorse.gif

 

 

 

Edited by Sokol1

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3 hours ago, Sokol1 said:

Bo'X' and DCS fake Sw@stik@s is just ridicule.

Well yeah but from war thunder, dcs and box, i like box most. It just looks least stupid :P

 

While lack of it in clod planes does not seem like a big deal since you wont see it anyway. On a huge ship, red flag with white circle would just look odd.

I guess this is what they are going for:

iwebuyknmgyugexdjxei.jpg

 

Could be better, could be worst :P i just hope one day they add steam workshop support for mods so people can easly post there missions and skins.

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10 hours ago, InProgress said:

While lack of it in clod planes does not seem like a big deal since you wont see it anyway. On a huge ship, red flag with white circle would just look odd.

I guess this is what they are going for:

 

Real or not who cares as long it looks good as this here........

 

image.png.55056b2d0cdbdac323aa326ee58c4506.png

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Silent Hunter III is awesome..Once and a while someone comes out with some thng that's great..IL-2 for example 2001 and still going

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Markings might be something like this too, which is closer to the historical naval flag:

 

GermanNavalEnsignwIronCrossFLAG008.png

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1 hour ago, II./JG27_Rich said:

Silent Hunter III is awesome..Once and a while someone comes out with some thng that's great..IL-2 for example 2001 and still going

image.png.55056b2d0cdbdac323aa326ee58c4506.png

Unless I'm mistaken, I think that image is from Silent Hunter 5 (unless it's a modded SH3). Had lots of fun with SH5 when I was 11, walkabout mode, learned alot about the Mediterranean, Norway, Operation Drumbeat, etc. While I agree that there were some issues with it, they weren't really that bad IMO.

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12 hours ago, Novice-Flyer said:

Unless I'm mistaken, I think that image is from Silent Hunter 5

It is from SH5. Original ubisoft version, no mods. Wolves of Steel for SH5 and Grey Wolves for SH3 will give you historical flags anyway.

 

14 hours ago, II./JG27_Rich said:

Silent Hunter III is awesome..Once and a while someone comes out with some thng that's great..IL-2 for example 2001 and still going

Try Grey Wolves, makes SH3 much much better and also graphic does not look like potato :P

http://www.thegreywolves.com/

 

 

Edited by InProgress
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