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dog1

nee tips for not seizing yak and mig engines

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hello

when online i keep seizing my Yak and Mig engines .I have the water and oil radiators open at 10-15 % rich at 80 and propeller in the case of the yak at 80 . yet i keep sezing 5mn into flight without pushing the engine hard . I dont have these issues with the LAG 5  . Can someone pls give me the optimum settings in combat and duration . tks

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The radiators need to be opened more that 10-15 %, you are probably cooking off all of the coolant.

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both radiators oil and water usually should be opened by how many DGS without hindering speed ? 

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Posted (edited)

They should be open on takeoff and close them in the climb, you close them enough to maintain a good temp normally under 100°C for coolants (decreases with altitude) so aim for about 80-90°C Range, Oil if it has IN about 60-70°C and OUT about 100°C. If you get a temp overheat message (make sure you have technical tips turned on settings enabled) then quickly set both the rads open and then start to close as you get the temps under control.  Failing that you can use Auto Radiator control L-Shift+R if you allow it on your settings for single player- this prob disabled on Multiplayer servers though).

I don't normally fly these aircraft but typically in cruise at cruise power I'm at 30-45% rads open.

Edited by Mikoyan74

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Rads usualy open to about 40-50% on these two, RPM and throttle can usually sit around 90% without issue all day long on these planes, it's honestly a wonder you're seizing the engine.

hilariously i tried to fly the I-16 and didn't comprehend it had inlet cowls, guess who has two thumbs and seized the engine?

 

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i am finding the mig very slow  or at least as indicated on the tachometer , is it in KMH or is it KNOTS ?  my temperatures were around 120 dgrs ,will aim for 80 except in combat for a short period .

i am adjusting both rads to 40-50 and its going fine now  , just worried about top speed a bit with the flaps acting as air brakes  .

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Airspeed on russian vehicles is in KMH as it is on German planes.
American and british planes will use MPH (unless you're flying a british navy plane in which case Knots it is)

 

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3 hours ago, dog1 said:

i am finding the mig very slow  or at least as indicated on the tachometer , is it in KMH or is it KNOTS ?  my temperatures were around 120 dgrs ,will aim for 80 except in combat for a short period .

i am adjusting both rads to 40-50 and its going fine now  , just worried about top speed a bit with the flaps acting as air brakes  .

The MiG only gets its best speed at altitude of 7km or above (IIRC). At low altitudes its not so great but it has a long allowable boost so you can often catch or at least keep up with 109F-2s - at higher altitudes you will outpace them outright. 109F-4s will outpace you at all altitudes though, and they can outclimb and outturn you at low speeds, so be cautious.

with the MiG I find I don't have to have the radiators open nearly as much as with the Yak. Mixture is very important on the MiG, it has an auto setting at 50% but I find I get better speed in combat by keeping the mixture at around 80% (just before boost engages), leaning with altitude. Keeping the mixture rich helps with cooling too. In cruise you can lean the mixture quite dramatically, but remember to enrich it or set it to auto before you go into combat or you'll overheat quickly. 

You can keep your RPMs and MP at max for the entire flight as long as you don't engage boost, but reducing RPM and MP will help you conserve fuel.
 

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Posted (edited)

Technical chat messages are useful, but it really does pay get accustomed to reading the dash panel.  Practice with it and eventually, you might not need the tech chat anymore.

 

In the map screen, there is a specification tab for each plane.  

Find the line that says what the max continuous manifold pressure and rpm settings are and go from there.  

 

The MiG-3 has indicators in the cockpit next to the oil and water radiator opening mechanisms.  For this particular plane, I find it to be very useful in visualizing just how much the rad flaps are open and sticking out into the wind.

The Yak does not, but you can't go wrong with starting out at 100% open for both oil and water rads.  If you're running cooler than the optimal you can close up from there. 

 

The Yaks do have "flush" settings (ie; the radiator is open as far as it can go without the cover protruding into the wind) but, using those settings does assume that a) it's winter, or b) you are keeping your speed up (300kph+) at all times and running slightly more conservative power settings.  The steeper you climb, the more you turn and the slower you get are all factors in overheating.  Maximizing wind flow that's entering the radiator as straightforward and as fast as possible are the things that best aid cooling

If you are going into a turn fight, open them all the way and learn to deal with the drag.  It's a lot better than having the advantage and losing the engine. It's MAJORLY better than being at a disadvantage and losing the engine. 

If you are going to attempt a single high speed pass attack then set the radiators as you see fit. 

   

As long as your radiators and RPMs are right - 2,200 for the MiG-3 and 2,600 should work for all 3 Yak models available - setting the manifold pressure at, or below, 100 (10 on the dial) is almost always a safe bet.   

 

Be sure to do any throttle changes - especially increases - smoothly.  You can cut throttle suddenly without much problem but, adding power too fast will cause engine damage.  It also can cause unwanted torque and gyro effect as well causing the plane to roll to one side or the other unexpectedly.  While cutting throttle suddenly can be done, it's not recommend.  There is also a change in torque and gyro with similar effect on the plane as well.  If you stay smooth and with some practice, you can still increase and decrease the throttle rather quickly and not damage the engine or suffer the consequences sudden 'spikes' in torque and gyro effect that might happen.

 

I don't know if it's modeled, but Increase the RPM setting BEFORE you add manifold pressure (raise throttle) and lower manifold pressure (reduce throttle) before lowering RPM speed.

You can raise or lower both settings evenly but you still want the correct handle to be slightly 'ahead' of the other depending on whether you're increasing or decreasing settings.  

 

The auto lean setting on the Mig-3 is 50% (49% in game currently for clean, smoke-free exhaust) but, you can run at 100% mixture all day long as long as you control the throttle.  The MiG's boost is strictly based on excess manifold pressure.  You can use the throttle to keep it around 10 on the manifold dial and run 100% mix with clean exhaust all flight long without issue.  If you gently push the throttle to the upper limit, then you will go into boost mode but, you can simply use the throttle to cut back and come out of boost without worrying about mix settings.  

*Running at 100% but the throttle backed-off to cruise settings may or may not be just as efficient as running 50% mix and full throttle but, I can't confirm this.  At high altitude, I'm pretty sure that 50% is the required setting.

 

The MiG has a max boost time limit of 10 minutes, but if you control it like I've described, you should be able to control the throttle and only use a "10 seconds here, 1 minute there" short boosts at the right times and still have plenty of boost time left over.  

 

Edited by =AVG77=Mobile_BBQ

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Posted (edited)
Quote

In the map screen, there is a specification tab for each plane.  

 excuse the silly question , where is this map screen ?

LA 5FN issue

   I was flying above 3000 mt , temperature cold ,  below 70 C , propeller at 80 , oil rad at 30  ,cruising at 50 % power then the engine seized , no message , why did this happen ? 

Cylinder head  cooling

which is the key to increase decrease cooling for the cylinder head ?

Edited by dog1

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Posted (edited)
57 minutes ago, dog1 said:

 excuse the silly question , where is this map screen ?

LA 5FN issue

   I was flying above 3000 mt , temperature cold ,  below 70 C , propeller at 80 , oil rad at 30  ,cruising at 50 % power then the engine seized , no message , why did this happen ? 

Cylinder head  cooling

which is the key to increase decrease cooling for the cylinder head ?

map Screen: when you open the full-screen map with "O" (that's my setting) you get a full screen map with a briefing on the right hand side. At the top of that briefing there is a tab that says "Specifications". if you click that tab it will show the specifications and engine limitations of the aircraft you are currently flying.

Which temperature were you monitoring? There is oil temperature and cylinder head temperature.

For the La-5FN, you have an oil radiator, inlet shutters and outlet shutters. You can keep your oil radiator fully open with almost no speed penalty (5 km/h I think), so just leave it open unless you really need to squeeze out some speed. The Inlet shutters can be left at 100% open, once again with almost no speed penalty - I think fully open is the lowest-drag setting on this plane. Keep the outlet shutters closed unless you are overheating, they are the main source of speed loss, they are extremely draggy when open. If you stay reasonably fast that should be all the cooling you need.  In a slow max power turn fight you will probably overheat more so just watch the temps and crack the outlet rads if necessary, but the La-5s are not made for low-speed turnfighting anyway so just don't do it (I have tried many times and failed).

Bear in mind you can also over-cool the engine if you are, for example, in an extended dive from high altitude with power at idle, or at very low power settings with rads fully open for extended periods in the winter.

Also the La-5s don't have a lot of flight endurance, so you can run out of fuel pretty quickly if you're not careful. 

Edited by RedKestrel
Map Screen explanation

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map screen 

Ok clear ,i use O as well for the GPS map , i  will consult before flying chosen aircraft ,.

Cooling 

The oil temperature  gauge  is controlled with 2 keys i use coma and full stop . thats the one i always watch ,i keep it below 100 ,when it seized it was at 70 degrees , 3000 mt winter.   but which is the key to manually control the cylinder heads temperature ?

Cooling LA5FN

  ok will do ..

Boost

Above 3000 mt do i forget boost and use 2 stage supercharge always ? do you switch off or it does it on its own 5mn later always ? i dont see any difference in performance . 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, dog1 said:

map screen 

Ok clear ,i use O as well for the GPS map , i  will consult before flying chosen aircraft ,.

Cooling 

The oil temperature  gauge  is controlled with 2 keys i use coma and full stop . thats the one i always watch ,i keep it below 100 ,when it seized it was at 70 degrees , 3000 mt winter.   but which is the key to manually control the cylinder heads temperature ?

Cooling LA5FN

  ok will do ..

Boost

Above 3000 mt do i forget boost and use 2 stage supercharge always ? do you switch off or it does it on its own 5mn later always ? i dont see any difference in performance . 

 


You don't control the guage directly, you control the radiator shutters. I don't know what the default keys are, but you need to map keys to open and close the inlet shutters and open and close the outlet shutters. I can't remember exactly what they're called in-game, they may also be referenced as 'cowl flaps'. Opening the inlet shutters and outlet shutters allow more cool air to flow over the cylinder heads, which cools them down. The oil radiator opens and provides airflow to the oil reservoir, cooling the oil as it circulates in the engine. The oil helps keep the engine cool but if your flaps are completely closed its doubtful the oil alone will be enough. the only reason to really ever close the inlet shutters is to prevent over cooling the engine.

All soviet planes in-game have manual radiator and shutter/flap settings, and they all have multiple cooling methods - oil radiator and either water radiator or inlet/outlet flaps. You need to use all the cooling methods to keep your plane going properly. If you are only monitoring the oil temperature gauge what's probably happening is your water coolant temperature or cylinder head temperature is getting too high and your engine is overheating.

Here's a summary for radiator options and settings for allied planes I've flown, sorry I don't remember the specific key bindings but the aircraft types that have specific types of inlet shutters/cowl flaps are all listed on the key bindings screen.

I-16: Oil Radiator and Cowl Flaps (controlled by Inlet shutters key I think); has an oil temp guage and a cylinder head temperature gauge. Does not have outlet shutters.

MiG-3: Has an oil radiator and a water radiator, and an oil temp guage and water temperature guage. There is an indicator showing how open the oil rad is, but not for the water rad.

Yak-1/Yak-1b: Has an oil rad and a water rad, and an oil temp and water temp guage. No indicators for radiator position. They need to be open a fair amount, I find moreso than the Mig.
Yak-7B: same as yak-1, tends to need the rads open more to stay cool IMO. No indicators for radiator position.
 
La-5/La-5FN: Oil Radiator, Inlet Flaps, and Outlet Flaps. Has an oil temp guage and a cylinder head guage. As mentioned before, just open the oil rad fully, open the inlet flaps fully, and close the outlet flaps, and if you ever overheat just reduce your engine power a bit or open the outlet flaps to dump heat. otherwise never touch your radiators and you will be fine.

Il-2 (all types): Water radiator and oil radiator. Has an oil temp and water temp guage These need to be open quite a lot to stay cool. The oil radiator shutter is armored so you can shut it for extra protection of your engine when diving to attack, but remember to open it again or you'll overhead.

Pe-2: Water radiators only. Water temp guage for each engine, but the water radiator button controls the radiator for both engines as long as they are both selected which is the default.

A-20: Has Oil radiator and inlet/outlet shutters: The oil radiator is tied automatically to the outlet shutters so you only need to use the outlet shutters. KEEP THE INLET SHUTTERS CLOSED IN FLIGHT. If you don't the plane will vibrate crazily, they are only meant to be open on the ground. I close them soon after start up as the planes in-game dont seem to overheat much on the ground as they may in real life. Shut them and forget about them, they do nothing for you in flight.

P-39: has water radiator and oil radiator, and water and oil temperature guage. With this plane, be REALLY CAREFUL how fast you move the throttle, a sudden throttle movement will break the engine crankshaft with torque.

P-47: has outlet cowls and oil intercooler (same buttons as oil radiator I think). Except for some circumstances, keep the oil intercooler at neutral (50%), the manual advises to close it in a dive but I find it not necessary. The cowl flaps are only to be opened below 225 mph, so open them during the takeoff run and during climb out but as soon as you reach a higher speed just close them the engine will stay cool without any help. 

Spitfire IX: Radiators are automatic. Haven't flown this bird yet, so no advice to give.

I have not flown the Spitfire VB or the P-40.

I don't believe the boost for the La-5s functions at higher altitudes so yeah you can probably ignore it. switch the supercharge at the altitude the specs tell you to. It shouldn't change on its own unless you're using simplified engine settings. You will see a drop off in performance above 3km but it won't be immediate, 3km is just where the drop-off starts. If you're currently flying with closed inlet shutters and other things that are overheating or seizing your engine, its possible you're not seeing a drop off in performance because your plane is never reaching its maximum performance to begin with.

EDIT: Here's a link to the aircraft tech specs in the forum here: 

 

Edited by RedKestrel
added tech specs link

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all , clear so there is no cylinder head radiator . the inlet flaps will take care off that . tks detailed explanations .

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