Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
CanadaOne

Books - What are you reading?

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, CanadaOne said:

 

Yeah, that's it. Not a happy story. Funky ending though.

I read that story when I was 14 or 15 years old. Because of it I have never had the desire to get a tattoo or piercing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Gordon200 said:

I read that story when I was 14 or 15 years old. Because of it I have never had the desire to get a tattoo or piercing.

 

I hear ya.  :biggrin:

 

I got one a few years ago, never gave that story a thought though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i started reading paradise lost, myself i wouldnt rebel for i belive all its a lie, you can just trust your personal experience

 

and though im the most miserable knight who ever dueled i have to say im touched by the beauty of evry single momnet ive lived so far

 

doctors say my case its an excess of dopamines, god bless the dopmanines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately I'm not reading anything terribly classic at the moment.  I'm slogging through Lucky 666 by Bob Drury.

It's one of those history-lite hero books that are so common nowadays.  Written by emotion enthusiasts with a limited grasp of their subject.  Did you know for example, that the P-38 was a fighter plane derived from the British Spitfire?  Or that B-17 gunners were reluctant to bail out in case they were cut in half by the aircraft's twin rudders?

 

FullSizeRender-4.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/13/2018 at 10:05 AM, CanadaOne said:

You mentioned Barbara Tuchman previously. Have you read her book "The Zimmerman Telegram"? It's a wonderful and colourful little book that adds significant detail to the relationship between Britain and the US during the war years.

 

No, this is my first book of hers that I've read. I've not read much WW1 literature and with this being such a landmark in the genre, I knew this was a good place to start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, ChiefWH said:

 

It's not about 'taboos' or intolerance of 'poor little' Milo; sometimes intolerance of things is just the right way, and those who want to 'discuss' it in the modern world in any light other than as abuse and grooming can fuck off.

 

Not sure why you have been stewing over this for days, Chief, but you make my point for me. Intolerance so extreme that it cannot be questioned or discussed is exactly that: a taboo. Here is wiki's definition:

 

 "a social or religious custom prohibiting or forbidding discussion of a particular practice or forbidding association with a particular person, place, or thing."

 

Despite our liberal outlook, we still have them, different now from two thousand years ago, or even two hundred, and I have no doubt will be different again two thousand years in the future. Also you really should not use quotation marks in that way, (edit -ie "poor Milo" was neither said nor implied)  since I certainly did not. It is, quite frankly, dishonest.

Edited by unreasonable

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎16‎/‎2018 at 1:06 PM, LukeFF said:

 

No, this is my first book of hers that I've read. I've not read much WW1 literature and with this being such a landmark in the genre, I knew this was a good place to start.

 

 

I've read a few dozen books on WWI. I find the time frame fascinating. Like a post in the ground separating the old world and the new.

 

This is another very good Barbara Tuchman book along with The Zimmerman Telegram. Though the chapters about the plague do not make for happy bedtime reading. But she's an excellent writer and historian.

 

 

IMG_20180711_201853.jpg

1 hour ago, Bremspropeller said:

I read aviation- and space related books mostly.

 

Sorry for being boring 😅

 

Not boring at all.  :cool:

 

I tend to watch more space documentaries than read space books. Gotta love the big screen HD action for Black Hole documentaries and stuff like that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/17/2018 at 3:06 AM, LukeFF said:

 

No, this is my first book of hers that I've read. I've not read much WW1 literature and with this being such a landmark in the genre, I knew this was a good place to start.

 

I'd highly recommend All Quiet on the Western Front and Somme Mud. Can't beat the stuff written by the men who were there.

 

On 7/16/2018 at 7:03 PM, Feathered_IV said:

Did you know for example, that the P-38 was a fighter plane derived from the British Spitfire?  Or that B-17 gunners were reluctant to bail out in case they were cut in half by the aircraft's twin rudders?

 

Please tell me that's not actually in the book...

Edited by FFS_Cybermat47

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 6:25 PM, CanadaOne said:

 

I enjoy freedom of expression no matter how weird. The envelope of free expression always has to be pushed, otherwise it contracts

 

Sir,

    I have thoroughly enjoyed reading in this topic. The range of interests and discussion of subjects, particularly philosophy is amazing. One is seldom able to engage with one’s compatriots to this degree.

     Continuing in this vain, would it be permissible, with all humility and due respect, to ask the following question: Do you really know all the words to “The Lumberjack Song”?

     (Sorry, I could not find a “pompous Twit” emoji (referring to myself) to use here.)

:unsure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZa26_esLBE

 

 

 

 

Edited by Arfsix
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Arfsix said:

 

Sir,

    I have thoroughly enjoyed reading in this topic. The range of interests and discussion of subjects, particularly philosophy is amazing. One is seldom able to engage with one’s compatriots to this degree.

     Continuing in this vain, would it be permissible, with all humility and due respect, to ask the following question: Do you really know all the words to “The Lumberjack Song”?

     (Sorry, I could not find a “pompous Twit” emoji (referring to myself) to use here.)

:unsure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZa26_esLBE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If and when I wear women's clothing is not something I am prepared to discuss in an open forum.

 

Unless I'm drunk. :drink2:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CanadaOne said:

 

 

If and when I wear women's clothing is not something I am prepared to discuss in an open forum.

 

Unless I'm drunk. :drink2:

 

It seems to be a very English thing, the country being neither very puritan nor very macho for most of it's modern history: although I expect there must be equivalent traditions elsewhere.  An American lady friend remarked on it years ago at a college year end do that involved several men in lingerie Morris dancing.  I think it stems from the theatrical tradition which is strong in the UK, in which traditionally women's roles were played by young men. Except in the Pantomime, where the Principal Boy is always played by an actress.  Drag artists have always been popular.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, unreasonable said:

 

It seems to be a very English thing, the country being neither very puritan nor very macho for most of it's modern history: although I expect there must be equivalent traditions elsewhere.  An American lady friend remarked on it years ago at a college year end do that involved several men in lingerie Morris dancing.  I think it stems from the theatrical tradition which is strong in the UK, in which traditionally women's roles were played by young men. Except in the Pantomime, where the Principal Boy is always played by an actress.  Drag artists have always been popular.  

 

 

Stems back to Greek theater I guess.  And the chorus wearing phallic facemasks... I tell ya.

 

God bless Aristophanes. Monty Python definitely followed in his footsteps. They must have pissed themselves laughing when his plays were performed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/16/2018 at 5:03 AM, Feathered_IV said:

Unfortunately I'm not reading anything terribly classic at the moment.  I'm slogging through Lucky 666 by Bob Drury.

It's one of those history-lite hero books that are so common nowadays.  Written by emotion enthusiasts with a limited grasp of their subject.  Did you know for example, that the P-38 was a fighter plane derived from the British Spitfire?  Or that B-17 gunners were reluctant to bail out in case they were cut in half by the aircraft's twin rudders?

 

FullSizeRender-4.jpg

 

B-17s had twin rudders?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Bearcat said:

 

B-17s had twin rudders?

and a leaky elsan toilet by the looks of things....nightmare!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, FFS_Cybermat47 said:

I'd highly recommend All Quiet on the Western Front

 

That was the 1st book I read cover to cover, back in the 1970's, but the impression it made on me at the time was so strong it's still with me. I would love to be able to read it in it's original German version.

 

 

On 7/12/2018 at 1:26 AM, CanadaOne said:

The Scots built this country. :drink2:

 

There's something in that, my great grandfather left the north west coast of Scotland to work on the Canadian-Pacific rail road construction back around 1910, he was a carpenter who did fancy staircases and the like on the big rail road hotels. He never made it back home and is buried in a place called Prince Rupert in British Columbia.

 

Cool thread anyhow, very memory provoking...oh as far as philosophers go, this would be my kind of guy :)

 

Epicurus

 

Epicurus.jpg

Edited by Pict
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, 19//Rekt said:

I've started reading the 20.5 volume Master & Commander series again from the beginning.

 

First time through was a little over ten years ago. I've just finished the first book...reading about the characters again is like catching up with old friends.

 

I was lucky enough to sail a tall ship for a couple of summers in my much younger days so this series really takes me back to my happy place. Or better said, a place where things make sense to me. I recommend them to anyone, don't let the nautical jargon or historical minutiae turn you off...plenty of resources and references on the internet now.

 

 

 

 

Love the Aubrey/Maturin series! I even have the cookbook that some die-hard fans cobbled together from the descriptions in the books.

 

YkGueu5.jpg

Edited by 216th_Cat
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't read any of Patrick O'Brian yet, although I did blast through all of the Hornblower novels a couple of years ago.  Is the Aubrey series similar?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Feathered_IV said:

I haven't read any of Patrick O'Brian yet, although I did blast through all of the Hornblower novels a couple of years ago.  Is the Aubrey series similar?

 

O'Brian's books are more literary - in a good way - and less focussed on keeping the action and story moving along. As Rekt says the Aubrey/Maturin relationship allows O'Brian to explore facets of the culture of the time in a much more sophisticated way than Forester did. 

 

I enjoyed the series, but there were occasions later on when I thought that a little more moving the story along would have been a good thing.  A Napoleonic land war analogy might be War and Peace vs The Sharpe series, although that difference is more extreme. 

 

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic!  Summer hols are here, the beach is calling and I've just rediscovered a box full of Flashman novels by George Macdonald Fraser!:biggrin:

 

Edit.

 

 I confess;   the closest I come to the Classics is 'I, Claudius':)

Edited by DD_Arthur

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just purchased a copy of Order Of Battle: German Panzers in WWII by Chris Bishop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/20/2018 at 6:40 PM, 19//Rekt said:

I've started reading the 20.5 volume Master & Commander series again from the beginning.

I love those books!

 

Also Captain Blood

Edited by Cathal_Brugha
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 $_3.JPG?set_id=2

 

When not too tired to understand... 😄

Edited by F/JG300_Egon
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm currently conducting research for a book of my own about a very peculiar set of lunatics who had a huge influence in the med in WW2.

One of the more supporting cast is this guy:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Wintle

 

I'm currently reading his autobiography The Last Englishman:

 

1002024797_51ooVIa1ngL._SX369_BO1204203200_.jpg.f8a1cabecf8c370377a9ed7af62a114a.jpg

 

 

It's rare for a book to actually reduce me to tears of laughter, but this one has. With the added benefit of being true!

 

Some examples of his deathless prose. On the importance of umbrellas:

 

wintle1.thumb.jpg.e22b8c1e10d3cdfd5aff0c75a009fef0.jpg



 

 

 

on the English mentality:

 

 

 

wintle5.thumb.jpg.2c52b82647c4963d22053bb6e51d89e2.jpg

On monocles:

 

wintle2.jpg.aa7aea4fc0c757f6c3b8e6b7a4a287d8.jpg

on the regimental motto:

 

wintle4.jpg.d4906abb6f0db6b20144928c5812e032.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted to get a handle on world history so I started reading on the various areas about a decade ago with intermittent breaks.  One area I needed to fill in was the Middle East.  I started out with A Peace to End All Peace which I found fascinating.  After, I moved chronologically from there.  Just finishing up The Yum Kippur War.  I will need some down time after this with some sci-fi or something.

41826447570_b481307b4d_c.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Long_Ships

 

image.png.6253006e184f3c753cfe106b222d19a4.png

 

pretty good read, great sense of humor too

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, VBF-12_Stick-95 said:

I wanted to get a handle on world history so I started reading on the various areas about a decade ago with intermittent breaks.  One area I needed to fill in was the Middle East.  I started out with A Peace to End All Peace which I found fascinating.  After, I moved chronologically from there.  Just finishing up The Yum Kippur War.  I will need some down time after this with some sci-fi or something.

41826447570_b481307b4d_c.jpg

 

 

I read one Benny Morris book from the library, "Righteous Victims". I think that's the title. He's a good writer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Picked up "Iranian F-14 Tomcat Units in Combat" by Tom Cooper for the non-fiction read, and a short story collection by Murakami called "Men Without Women" for the fictional side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/13/2018 at 1:25 AM, CanadaOne said:

One of the scariest things about "1984" was the organized devolution of language in order to suppress free speech and free thought,

i think orwell as asimov or kubrick was a conspirator in the know

 

asimov in his end of eternity pointed to the reality changes only noticed by the eternals and orwell to the language manipulation

 

you want to see an example of whats going on?

 

i say theres a confabulation that can only be noticed by memories theyre not real anymore, as i remember my heart beating on the left of my chest and now it beats in my stomach

 

and you say yes confabulation is a fake memory and i say no confabulation is a conspiracy

 

basically big brother changed the meaning of confabulation from conspiracy to fake memory to tamper with the thought of people

 

so they misslead the attention from their conspiracy to the pathology of those who claim it

 

edit:

 

you see am i the only one who rememebrs my heart WAS on the left and confabulation  meant conspiracy?

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confabulation

 

edit:

 

the real thing:

 

1200-505048271-human-heart-location.jpg

the confabulation:

 

operation-game.jpg

 

free-vector-the-set-of-target-vectors-hu

 

mockup-a11362f7.jpg?fit=600,600&ssl=1

 

sincere-young-beard-man-swearing-hand-he

 

evolution my arse

 

 

edit:

 

this guy on the other hand is not confabulated and pathological and properly knows where the heart is

 

the sorry thing he is right just stand up and check where your heart beats :)

 

One+Direction+Live+In+Sydney+102KmiRrtSq

Edited by raaaid
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

edit:

 

im not going offtopic im discussing the ideas put forward by asimov in his end of eternity and orwell 1984

 

is there anybody else who remembers confabulation meaning conspiracy? then you know what orwell pointed of language manipulation was not fiction but documentary

 

have youe ever know the main theory for mankind majoritarial right handedness?

 

it was to stub enemies in the heart,giving an evolutionary advantage to dextrum but now its in the center we know that theory is false

 

i read that in a book but probably that book doesnt exist anymore for we never had the heart in the left giving an advnatage to destrousness, a confabulation of mine yeah im a dement

 

and what does the end of the eternity tell us?

 

that if someone comes with a water engine they just time travel and supress it

 

the end of eternity time travel conspiracy is 100% fool proof

 

and ive seen in tv angels arguing, "why do they call the service the service?"

 

what will mankind do when we use biofuels as we use now petrol?

 

but isnt it just fair for medicating those who think free enrgy is posible as insane?

 

quote-the-final-end-of-eternity-and-the-

Edited by raaaid

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

theres no better way to enjoy a fiction than take it as real or plausible

 

asimovs best work is his end of eternity i really recomend it

 

the concept of reality change is mind blowing yet posible

 

philip k dick is good for that too i like his time out of joint

 

on the other hand i can no stand arthur c clarcke for an hallucination i had:

 

i saw a documental in which he admitted to pay kids for sex

 

thats what being crazy is like, i wacthed it in tv and what is worse is that the sun published it and later couldnt provide the tape i saw on tv at the request of the interpol to charge clarcke

 

i really recomend time out of joint because thats currently my main delsuion its a truman show with a time travel twist

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just finished reading the Martian and it's probably the best book I've read. It's realistic, believable and does a good job of explaining the science behind the MC's attempt at survival. It also has very good pacing, humour plus a good few references to geek culture. If you've seen the film, it even more so worth the read as it helps picture it better and plus it goes into far more detail 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎25‎/‎2018 at 10:09 AM, F/JG300_Egon said:

 $_3.JPG?set_id=2

 

When not too tired to understand... 😄

 

 

I think I'm on my fourth copy of that book. I'd lend it out, never get it back, buy it again, lend it out, never get it back, wash, rinse, repeat.

 

No one gets the copy I have. :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

does it mention paralel universes? i may read it if so

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i really love borges though my mom didnt li me reading him for him leads insane :)

 

 

This bullet is an old one.

In 1897, it was fired at the president of Uruguay by a young man from Montevideo, Avelino Arredondo, who had spent long weeks without seeing anyone so that the world might know that he acted alone. Thirty years earlier, Lincoln had been murdered by that same ball, by the criminal or magical hand of an actor transformed by the words of Shakespeare into Marcus Brutus, Caesar’s murderer. In the mid-seventeenth century, vengeance had employed it for the assassination of Sweden’s Gustavus Adolphus in the midst of the public hecatomb of battle.

In earlier times, the bullet had been other things, because Pythagorean metempsychosis is not reserved for humankind alone. It was the silken cord given to viziers in the East, the rifles and bayonets that cut down the defenders of the Alamo, the triangular blade that slit a queen’s throat, the wood of the Cross and the dark nails that pierced the flesh of the Redeemer, the poison kept by the Carthaginian chief in an iron ring on his finger, the serene goblet that Socarates drank down one evening.

In the dawn of time it was the stone that Cain hurled at Abel, and in the future it shall be many things that we cannot even imagine today, but that will be able to put an end to men and their wondrous, fragile life.

— Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986) In Memoriam, J.F.K. (1965)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...