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51IFGmishomor

Couple questions for P40 pro's

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Just tried P40 in WOL for the first time and got pretty impressed with those .50 cals. They seem to light up engines easy and I was able to rip apart two 110's in no time, 3'rd one got me though :).  I kept manifold/rpm safe when in combat at 40/2900 and didn't have any engine issues. Thing is ... I got feeling that plane isn't much faster with combat setup then when using cruise setup 37/2600 if at all. Is that just me or ...? Also is mixture auto? It seems to set at 66% at takeoff but not sure how to use it. Tried various options but I didn't really see any difference except when being over 95% it would give me mixture warning, no matter what alt (flew mostly below 3k). 

 

Cheers!

   

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IIRC mixture has 3 settings: full rich (used for take off and full power at low altitude, auto rich (for combat or whenever else you need richter mixture) and auto lean (for cruising)

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The combat mode isn't massively faster than max. continuous. Although the plane has a (well deserved) reputation for blowing engines, try flying it in QMB and get used to how far you can push the engine in emergency mode. This is where you start to get a significant amount of extra speed.

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I always leave it at "auto" since moving it away from auto turns it difficult to then set it back to the right auto spot...

 

I could take note of the % value displayed in the technochat, but I was lazy to do so....

Edited by jcomm-in-combat

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On the P-40 I keep the mixture at 67% and the RPM at 2600, which is something like 71-73%. Then I just manage the manifold pressure into and out of the 'combat power' range as necessary. Maybe not perfect but it's manageable under pressure.

 

Make sure to keep the radiator/cowling flaps mostly closed unless you are flying slowly a lot at combat power...they are very effective at cooling but also a big air brake.

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71-73%. Then I just manage the manifold pressure into and out of the 'combat power' range as necessary

 

That is how I can't get it too wrong. Nice and easy and if you have to blast the power for a second here or there that is usually fine. Stupid non metric gauges... :fool:

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Always keep the mixture on AUTO, FULL RICH is to be used only when engine is damaged (at least according to the manual), basically for your purposes, there is no reason to adjust mixture, we are not flying long enough missions to care about running lean cruise settings.

A good thing to keep in mind is that you increase RPMs FIRST when going into combat. If you are cruising at 2600/37"Hg, increasing RPM too 3000 will increase manifold pressure automatically to around 42"Hg. If you increase throttle, then increase RPMs, you may potentially put too much boost into the intake.

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IIRC mixture has 3 settings: full rich (used for take off and full power at low altitude, auto rich (for combat or whenever else you need richter mixture) and auto lean (for cruising)

 

Full rich will give you less power than auto rich but it will have enhanced cooling due to excessive, unburned fuel. Just keep it at auto rich and change to auto lean if you're really low on fuel (normally doesn't happen in the P-40) :biggrin:

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That is how I can't get it too wrong. Nice and easy and if you have to blast the power for a second here or there that is usually fine. Stupid non metric gauges... :fool:

 

 

LOL I was all about knots IAS and feet of altitude thanks to some real-world flight lessons and a million hours of FSX...but now I've been completely assimilated into the Borg. Didn't really take to long to start thinking in terms of km/h and meters.

 

 

Always keep the mixture on AUTO, FULL RICH is to be used only when engine is damaged (at least according to the manual), basically for your purposes, there is no reason to adjust mixture, we are not flying long enough missions to care about running lean cruise settings.

A good thing to keep in mind is that you increase RPMs FIRST when going into combat. If you are cruising at 2600/37"Hg, increasing RPM too 3000 will increase manifold pressure automatically to around 42"Hg. If you increase throttle, then increase RPMs, you may potentially put too much boost into the intake.

The way that RPM and MP relate on the P-40 in game makes no sense to me. Everything I've read says that (at a given throttle setting) increasing RPM should decrease MP and decreasing RPM would increase MP? Our P-40 does the exact opposite...

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The way that RPM and MP relate on the P-40 in game makes no sense to me. Everything I've read says that (at a given throttle setting) increasing RPM should decrease MP and decreasing RPM would increase MP? Our P-40 does the exact opposite...

Why would that happen? Increasing engine RPM will make the supercharger, which is geared off the crankshaft, rotate faster, increasing MP.

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Why would that happen? Increasing engine RPM will make the supercharger, which is geared off the crankshaft, rotate faster, increasing MP.

You're right - the supercharger is the reason!

 

The relationship I described must only apply to naturally aspirated engines.

Edited by 19//Rekt

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Personally I fly the P-40 in the following way:

Cruise:
73% RPM (2600ish)
40 inches manifold pressure.

Climb after take off:
73% RPM
43 Inches

I let the manifold pressure drop into cruise mode and then I put it back up by increasing the throttle until its not anymore possible due to alititude.
I am sometimes using a higher RPM for climbing. I am confident that you can use 85% RPM. That should improve climb performance a lot and is doable for 8-10mins at no issues.
As soon as I am on alt I put everything to cruise.

Combat:
100% RPM (3000)
43 inches, sometimes 45 for a few seconds.

That works for every normal fight. You have to be careful in dives, since that may overrev the engine.

Not have blown the engine yet with those settings. Mix is set to auto rich (66%) at all times. Sometimes if i want to save fuel i drop it to auto lean.(33%)
 

Edited by DerSheriff
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You're right - the supercharger is the reason!

 

The relationship I described must only apply to naturally aspirated engines.

The actual P-40 manifold pressure decreases with increasing RPM up to a certain (unstated) altitude, then it reverses and increases. This is directly from the flight manual. The game is wrong.

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It seems that we will have to deal with the p-40's engine limits issue for a while :(

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The V-1710-39 had a Normal Power rating of 880 horsepower at 2,600 r.p.m. at Sea Level; Take Off Power rating of 1,150 horsepower at 3,000 r.p.m. at Sea Level, with 44.5 inches of manifold pressure (1.51 Bar), 5 minute limit; and a War Emergency Power rating of 1,490 horsepower at 3,000 r.p.m., with 56 inches of manifold pressure (1.90 Bar). The V-1710-F3R was 7 feet, 4.38 inches (2.245 meters) long, 3 feet, 0.64 inches (0.931 meters) high, and 2 feet, 5.29 inches (0.744 meters) wide. It had a dry weight of 1,310 pounds (594 kilograms).

 

https://www.thisdayinaviation.com/tag/allison-v-1710-39/

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As i guy who loves the P40 but is unable to fly it well in combat, i really like this threat...Still makes me wonder how these pilot flew it against both A6m's Ki43 and Bf109F's with any succes whatsoever....

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As i guy who loves the P40 but is unable to fly it well in combat, i really like this threat...Still makes me wonder how these pilot flew it against both A6m's Ki43 and Bf109F's with any succes whatsoever....

The same way the Finns flew obsolete ****hole aircraft succesfully against the Soviet Union.

 

The fighting qualities of the aircraft is only one small aspect of its use in war. Sure, it can play a role, but superiority in tactical deployment, training etc. can easily overcome even fairly large deficiencies in performance of the plane itself.

 

Also: Compared to contemporary Japanese fighters the P-40E was pretty fast.

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I am also a huge believer that in real life, the pilot's skill went much further than it does with the sim. With the magic of respawn, I think the average sim pilot can learn how to fly his sim plane much closer to the edge of the envelope than the overwhelming majority of real pilots (that's my hunch and I'm sticking to it). So in our sim world (combat tactics/scale aside) the airplane's capabilities are more important by comparison because the average "pilot" is probably getting more out of his ride.

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Personally I fly the P-40 in the following way:

 

Cruise:

73% RPM (2600ish)

40 inches manifold pressure.

 

Climb after take off:

73% RPM

43 Inches

 

I let the manifold pressure drop into cruise mode and then I put it back up by increasing the throttle until its not anymore possible due to alititude.

I am sometimes using a higher RPM for climbing. I am confident that you can use 85% RPM. That should improve climb performance a lot and is doable for 8-10mins at no issues.

As soon as I am on alt I put everything to cruise.

 

Combat:

100% RPM (3000)

43 inches, sometimes 45 for a few seconds.

 

That works for every normal fight. You have to be careful in dives, since that may overrev the engine.

 

Not have blown the engine yet with those settings. Mix is set to auto rich (66%) at all times. Sometimes if i want to save fuel i drop it to auto lean.(33%)

 

 

Thanks for this info! Really helpful for getting the max out of this plane in game. Do you have these blurbs available anywhere else for other planes? It's nice know the max prop/throttle you can use in game without blowing up the engine thank you.

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Thanks for this info! Really helpful for getting the max out of this plane in game. Do you have these blurbs available anywhere else for other planes? It's nice know the max prop/throttle you can use in game without blowing up the engine thank you.

 

 

I found these guides pretty useful when I first started. It is not a comprehensive list unfortunately.

 

https://www.mudspike.com/chucks-guides-il2-battle-of-stalingrad/

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When I fly solo i usually climb high enough to where if I set my RPM at 2600 and my throttle to full then I wont dip into combat power. I'll still be at max continuous. That seems to be at the 13,000 feet range on the altimeter. If I climb any higher I would need to raise my RPM to keep competitive with anyone co-alt with me. For that reason if I see anyone higher than 13k feet I'll either dive away or try and avoid detection.

 

Once you understand that your manifold pressure is not going to stay the same as you gain or lose altitude youl be a lot better at engine management in this plane. There is no MP governor so as you climb youll need more throttle to stay at the same MP. I hardly ever change RPM and leave it set at 2600. The game currently does not penalize you for increasing MP without first increasing RPM like I usually read people talk about being unrealistic on these forums. So my use of combat power only comes from me increasing MP. The reason I dont fiddle with RPM is its hard for me to remember to set it back down to max continuous after a tough fight and I risk blowing my engine. 

 

I usually always stay fast and only engage people lower than me. If the engagement is developing into a turn fight and altitude is running out quick I like to disengage back toward friendly territory as soon as possible. It saves my bacon sometimes if I time it right but if there is not enough separation they usually use their superior speed to catch up with you. 

 

I only take %50 fuel or less. The P40 has the biggest fuel tank for a single engine plane in the game with over an hour of flight time at full capacity. This helps a lot with maneuverability and climb rate.

 

I never go above %20 on the cowl flaps. The plane stays plenty cool with it set at %10 for cruising. I'll leave the cowl flaps at %10 while I'm fighting but when I disengage I'll open it up a bit more to cool off the engine. 

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Just got this plane as well and I think I've got the hang of the throttle. Well, I haven't blown the engine yet, so far so good. Wondering if I'm flying it a bit too cautiously though, in your experience how far can you push it into emergency power and for how long?

 

I also noticed that you can go from max continuous to combat using only the RPM setting. I was cruising at 37"hg (green line) and 2600rpm, then going to 3000rpm brings the MP nicely up to 43"hg without touching the throttle and vice-versa.

 

My only complaint is that both throttle and RPM react very slowly to input, so it's easy to overshoot the desired setting especially with the controls mapped to buttons instead of axes.

 

On the other hand... that cockpit! It's like I'm in some grand palace compared to basically every other fighter in game. It feels like the instrument panel is a mile away!

Edited by VC_

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Just got this plane as well and I think I've got the hang of the throttle. Well, I haven't blown the engine yet, so far so good. Wondering if I'm flying it a bit too cautiously though, in your experience how far can you push it into emergency power and for how long?

 

I might have forgotten the exact values but it's like:

 

2600rpm under 40" MP - as long you want.

3000rpm under 40" MP - +10 minutes - somewhat stronger, yet longish.

3000rpm under 45" MP - 5m.

3000rpm under 50" MP - 1m.

And... (P40' "secret" trump card)

3000rpm plus 100% throttle - probably +70 MP and over 1700HP for no more than 30 seconds.

 

In the P40 don't depend on your engine power alone when engaged. Best settings are powerful, but very brief so the potential (altitude) energy will be your close friend. Still, you want to keep combat as short as possible, because when you will end on a deck with 109s around, you will burn the engine in no time...

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The actual P-40 manifold pressure decreases with increasing RPM up to a certain (unstated) altitude, then it reverses and increases. This is directly from the flight manual. The game is wrong.

Up to Critical altitude

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I might have forgotten the exact values but it's like:

 

2600rpm under 40" MP - as long you want.

3000rpm under 40" MP - +10 minutes - somewhat stronger, yet longish.

3000rpm under 45" MP - 5m.

3000rpm under 50" MP - 1m.

And... (P40' "secret" trump card)

3000rpm plus 100% throttle - probably +70 MP and over 1700HP for no more than 30 seconds.

 

In the P40 don't depend on your engine power alone when engaged. Best settings are powerful, but very brief so the potential (altitude) energy will be your close friend. Still, you want to keep combat as short as possible, because when you will end on a deck with 109s around, you will burn the engine in no time...

 

Your memory is pretty close...the Specifications are:

Takeoff Power 3000 rpm and 45.5" MP (2 minutes)

Nominal Power 2600 rpm and 37.2" MP (No Limit)

Combat Power 3000 rpm and 42" MP (5 minutes)

 

Doing some testing to check your second set of numbers, specifically your 3000 rpm and <40" is also in the region of Combat Power in game. Just prior to 9 minutes I got a warning that Combat Power limits had been exceeded. Right around the 14:30 mark the engine began to fail. My test was on a summer map at 1000 meters, configuration was 70% fuel and a FAB-500 on the centerline. I set the MP at 40" since that is in pilot speak "top of the yellow arc." FWIW there was only about a 10 mph improvement over 2600 rpm and 37" MP (260 mph versus 250 mph).

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FWIW there was only about a 10 mph improvement over 2600 rpm and 37" MP (260 mph versus 250 mph).

 

Only 4% difference in velocity, but +8% in kinetic energy - a handy amount in combat.

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Ok so 30 seconds at "hail mary" power, that sounds fun! I did that by accident on first take-off, rammed the throttle to full by reflex. Need to try it in a more controlled environment.

 

Is it just me or is it a bit bouncy and floaty on take-off? In the air it's on rails, very nice ride, but taking off I'm working the rudder and ailerons very hard and it's a bit hairy.

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As i guy who loves the P40 but is unable to fly it well in combat, i really like this threat...Still makes me wonder how these pilot flew it against both A6m's Ki43 and Bf109F's with any succes whatsoever....

Well, the P-40 could boom and zoom the Japanese aircraft, which was really their only option. An experienced RAAF Squadron Leader actually died after being ordered by a braindead superior to dogfight, as it was “more honourable” :rolleyes:

 

The P-40 was also a tough and powerful old bird. IIRC Clive Caldwell managed to fight off two Bf-109 Fs that BnZed him, and even shoot one of them down, thanks to his skill and the Kittyhawk’s tough airframe and six 50. cals.

Edited by FFS_Cybermat47

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Advance the throttle slowly on take off.  Even with a full loadout I will use 90% prop pitch on takeoff as a bit of an insurance policy, then lowering it to 71% or so as soon as I get the wheels in the well.

 

She does take a fair bit of rudder correction on take off, but so do most of these old crates with over 1000bhp on tap.

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