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Ju-52 crosswind landing

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I'm running into an issue when crosswind landing with Tante Ju:

 

After touch down as the speed decreases, she will always turn into the wind Any way to correct that?

 

How I do it:

 

I let the plane "crabbed" during the approach.

 

During flare I kick the rudder to align the nose with the runway and I lower the wing that's towards the wind.

 

During roll out I apply aileron deflection towards the wind.

 

As the plane slows down I looses control as it turn it's nose to face the wind regardless of rudder and brakes input.

 

Any tips?

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That seems strange. I haven’t flown the Ju 52 in months, so can’t really help you.

 

One thing is for sure though: An aircraft in the air will never turn to face the wind.

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I do not off hand know what maximum landing crosswind component is for Ju-52

 

perhaps some-one has this info from flight manual

 

some good manuals here, but my german is V poor

 

https://ww2aircraft.net/forum/threads/junkers-ju-52-manuals.15299/

 

Cheers Dakpilot

 

**Edit** just for fun  :cool:

 

Edited by Dakpilot
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Based on what I can still remember from all those years ago in real life (which gets more iffy by the day), from a type suggestive of a possibly similar situation, I'd guess that max crosswind is no more than about 15 knots.

 

Of course, that's like saying that I know a guy who has a friend whose sister dates the cousin of a friend of one of the developers and he told her that Kuban will be released this coming Friday.

 

It could be right, but it ain't necessarily so.

 

EDIT: That would be 15 knots at 90 degrees, obviously, the maximum varying with the angle of the crosswind.

Edited by Oubaas

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I often have hard time landing ju52, for some reason it always push me to the side so instead of landing like this | I land like this / and I often crash into searchlight or something next to runway..

 

I think when you are too slow, like 150km/h it gets bad, but if you land at 200km or a bit more then it's not that bad. Kind of hard when runway is short, but it's really nice in Stalingrad, Pitomnik airfield I think. That one is kind of long.

Edited by InProgress

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One thing to keep in mind, is that the torque from the engine on the 52 is very very strong. 

 

So, after you take off you typically have to trim your rudder quite heavily. sometimes when I come into land, I will forget that I had to trim my yaw, and it will seem like I am flying sideways and losing alot of speed. 

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Salut! 

Check if your rudder trim is set to neutral before landing,

Never put throttle under 30% to not engage the break system.

On the runway, keep 60% throttle and control your aircraft with brakes

Let me know if it helps, I subscribe this topic.

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For proper flying, you want to cross your controls a bit earlier than the flare. Stabilize your aircraft before that with crossed controls. You don‘t want it still swinging around when touching down. Tail draggers are very mercyless when not sitting them down all straightened out. In the age of taildraggers, they used large fields instead of runways for a reason. You can always take off and land straight into the wind, which is easy. A narrow runway in crosswind condition is something the aircraft were not made for.

 

It is also of note that when the tail comes down, you lose most of your rudder authority in many of these aircraft. If you have significant crosswind, if a tailwheel is not locked it will very readily turn into the wind. Hence the good advise in keeping a fair amount of power on the runway. You have a slow aircraft on relatively large fields, use that.

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+1 Zacharias!

I pilot a taildragger in the real life and I confirm what Zacharias said, luckily, my tailwheel is locked to the rudder input (with springs) so when the tail is on the ground, I keep my stick pulled all the time so the tailwheel is pushed into the ground so it has some authority which compensate the lack of authority of the rudder.

 

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Thanks guys, I'll get my stable flare position on final.

 

Nil, may I ask what you fly?

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Look here, how NOT to do crosswind landings, at least not with a taildragger.

 

 

They conditions may be apalling, but count the instances, where the pilot actually crosses controls to straighen out the aircraft in final approoach. Compare that to the number of landings, where the pilot slams the bird on the runway crabwise. Some are clearly aware of how to do it, some are not or are too busy to think of that as well. So i don't really share the assessment of the poster "...Check out the amazing skills of the pilots. Some of them realy had a hard time trying to land during these stormy conditions. ..." It is clear that those pilots have not much experience about what can go wrong if you fly like that with the old crates. Nevertheless, no bent metal, thumbs up!

 

Maximum crosswind rating depends on the maximum banking angle where the wing / engines will not strike the ground when touching down on one wheel. You will not notice when coming to land with one wheel first instead of both at the time.

 

With the old crates, you really have to get used to slightly different procedures. They are not more difficult to fly (some fly very, very well), but they are different. And if you operae them outside their intended usage (grass fields, always take off / land into the wind), then you have to make a lot of things correctly that a modern plane would let you get away with.

 

If you set down a taildragger crabwise, he will most likely get jumpy or even summersault on the ground. Nose wheel aircraft, those you can skid around a lot.

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