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New PC to run IL2

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After 7yrs I'm long overdue for a new PC.  For a budget of up to $2500 what would y'all recommend for hardware that will run IL2 on high/max settings? 

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This game like most other flight simulators are CPU-bound. This means the 1st thing you want to spend your money on to get decent FPS (frames per second) in a decent processor. Someone with more experience may chime in but IMHO you have to do your research. This means things like Hyper-Threading isn't used in IL-2 Sturmovik to my knowledge so the number of physical cores are more important to this game than virtual ones. The processor speed is very important. I am an "Intel-Inside" guy - I used to be AMD man until the i7-920 came out, that was my 1st Intel build and Intel has always out performed AMD "withing the same processor class". The most overlooked item after this is the cooling for your CPU - I like All-in-Ones (I use the Thermaltake Ultimate 3.0 because I overclock to get the most out of my processor. Note: this may not be right for you!

 

The above goes hand in hand with your motherboard and RAM- Here you research to see what is best for what you use your PC primary for. This means what chipset is right for you? Z370 or X299 (I only know Intel)? Here you also have to thing about memory - It's about finding the sweet spot between the speed of your RAM and how much RAM. Not speed isn't just MHz, but CL and each clock cycle. I like Z series chipsets as they seem to be better for gaming - just my opinion here! I think that anything more that 32GB of RAM is overkill - if you are just gaming.

 

Obviously is your graphics card is next - I tend to believe in pairing Intel with Nvidia GPU chips and AMD with Radeon GPU chips. Again, research to find out what what you want out of your gaming experience and you will get what you spend.

 

Next is storage - Here is where it get's tricky: I like to load up fast - thus (M.2) PCIe NVme and SATA drives are the fastest. From back back in the early days of IL-2 (...we are talking 2001 here), we had online campaign battles (Bellum, VEF I, VEF II, SEOW, DED etc...) and it was a race to load into the game 1st to get the best aircraft of the selection. My Western Digital 1K RPM 36GB Raptor was king, that paired with my 128K ISDN made sure I wasn't saddled with a Bf 109F2, when there was a F-4 available - I even think it got to a point people called me a cheater!  ;) So yes, storage does matter - I would keep each of your games on it's on drive. It goes M.2 (NVme PCIe then SATA), 3.5" SSD SATA III, then your WD 1K Raptors and so on - this is just a basic list.

 

Your power supply - a very import part of the build. You get this wrong and you will experience reboots and BSDs with no rhyme or reason. I added this last because your PSU will depend on the processor, GPU and # of drives to are installing. There is no right answer here - but there is a wrong answer! I would use PSU calculators on the web when you have nailed down the above. Note: Those PSU ratings (GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM) do mean something.

 

Your case will be most depended on your CPU cooling choice - not every case will fit a 360MM radiator. The use number of USB 3.0 vs 2.0 in addition to what your mother board has is important thing to take into consideration. That's all I have to say about that

 

Note: The human eye can not distinguish the difference between a constant 30 fps and a constant 100 fps. This is a scientific fact! How do I know? Disney's animated feature films were work on 24 frames per second - have you ever seen a stutter watching Bambi? Thus, don't think you need to achieve some magic number of fps to enjoy a game without stuttering. Actually it is the jumping back and forth between frame rates that drop below 30 is what your eye interprets as stuttering.

Edited by JG7_X_Man

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I don't know when games like IL2 will start fully using 8 cores 16 threads, so for now go for the processors with highest single core speeds (Something along the lines of Intel i7 7700K).

 

A mid-high GPU like the GTX 1070 or similar will do for monitors and for VR get the beefiest GPU you can afford.

 

Note: The human eye can not distinguish the difference between a constant 30 fps and a constant 100 fps. This is a scientific fact! How do I know? Disney's animated feature films were work on 24 frames per second - have you ever seen a stutter watching Bambi? Thus, don't think you need to achieve some magic number of fps to enjoy a game without stuttering. Actually it is the jumping back and forth between frame rates that drop below 30 is what your eye interprets as stuttering.

Sorry but that's not a scientific fact and it's absolutely garbage. Also FYI, the majority of the movies you watch at the theater are in 24fps. (few exceptions like The Hobbit, shot at 48fps). The difference is that movies pan the cameras slowly and dont jerk it around, whic is when the low fps are most noticeable.

 

I agree that having inconsistent high and low fps is more disturbing than having consistent lower frames.

 

But the difference between 30 fps and 100fps is real, very real, especially when you look around the cockpit with trackIR.

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Are you looking to build or to buy? If buying I would suggest a place like https://www.ibuypower.com/ so you can customize every little thing. Thats where I got my rig just as the 1070's were coming out. I had one of the early copies that died after about a week. They took care of it no questions asked and not expense to me. They'll also factory overclock if doing that yourself is not your thing!

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30 vs 100 fps is absolutely noticable, that myth really needs to die. The human eye is theoretically capable of detecting upwards of 1000 fps, though the law of diminishing returns pops up once above 100 fps. Regardless, for building your own PC, I recommend:

 

CPU: i5-8600k and plan to overclock it to 5.0 GHz ($260)

CPU cooler: Arctic Liquid Freezer 120 ($70)

Motherboard: ASRock Z370 Extreme4 ($165)

RAM: 16GB DDR4 3200 ($200)

Case: $100 for a mid-tower that fits your needs

PSU: $80 for 650-850W gold rated or higher

 

All that works out to $875 and is pretty close to top of the line for gaming. Now the next question is whether we are including joysticks, monitors, keyboards and so on. Assuming you're happy with what you have, then I recommend a GTX 1080 TI ($750) + Oculus Rift ($400). If you need a new monitor, joystick and so on, then I recommend a GTX 1070 + a good 1440p monitor.

 

An important note: graphics card prices are currently running at near double MSRP thanks to the crypto bubble that finally seems to have burst a couple days ago. I expect GPU prices to drop down to sane levels over the next couple weeks, but for now they are heavily inflated everywhere I've checked. As such, I recommend holding off on buying any graphics card for just a little bit longer.

 

 

 

Edit: Forgot storage and OS, silly me.

Storage: 1TB SSD ($250)

OS: Windows 10 64 bit ($100)

 

Result is still in budget.

Edited by BeastyBaiter

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...Wow Jade - you said the exact same statement I made - 

Disney's animated feature films work on 24 frames per second - have you ever seen a stutter watching Bambi? 

Here is what I am saying - If you have a solid 30 FPS - with no peeks and valleys, your experience will be just as good with 100 FPS or 1000 FPS with no peaks and valleys. My very good friend is an ophthalmologist, according to him is the "hiccups" in frames rate when they drop is what were see as stuttering. In gaming, CPU processing delays (... like the building pop ups and explosions) - which is why I said CPU processor speed is important (...again you quoted what I already said) - also this is more so the BCLK (Bus Clock) example 100 MHz (BCLK) x 48 (Clock Multiplier) = 4.8GHz but so is 105 MHz (BCLK) x 46 (Clock Multiplier) = 4.8GHz - the latter will give you better FPS because of a faster Bus Clock.

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The human eye can not distinguish the difference between a constant 30 fps and a constant 100 fps. This is a scientific fact! How do I know? Disney's animated feature films were work on 24 frames per second - have you ever seen a stutter watching Bambi? Thus, don't think you need to achieve some magic number of fps to enjoy a game without stuttering. Actually it is the jumping back and forth between frame rates that drop below 30 is what your eye interprets as stuttering.

:lol:

 

edit : stop this nonsense..

Edited by icecream

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...Wow Jade - you said the exact same statement I made - 

Disney's animated feature films work on 24 frames per second - have you ever seen a stutter watching Bambi? 

Here is what I am saying - If you have a solid 30 FPS - with no peeks and valleys, your experience will be just as good with 100 FPS or 1000 FPS with no peaks and valleys. My very good friend is an ophthalmologist, according to him is the "hiccups" in frames rate when they drop is what were see as stuttering. In gaming,

 

Blatantly false.

 

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For $2500, it is easy to build a PC that can run Il-2 very well at the highest settings. However, as others have said, you can probably achieve a similar experience without spending nearly as much. To make a better decision, it would be useful to know the following:

  • Your monitor resolution and refresh rate (or does the $2500 include the cost of a new monitor?)
  • Do you plan to use VR?

VR requires high CPU performance, meaning that you will benefit from a i7-8700K overclocked to around 5GHz. To achieve this speed, you will want to have a good motherboard and strong cooling solution. However, if you only plan to use a monitor, a far more modest setup will be perfectly adequate. 

 

Regardless, the top-tier GPU will be the GTX 1080 Ti. Note that it won't even be necessary if you plan to play at lower resolutions. 

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...Wow Jade - you said the exact same statement I made -

 

My point was that it is not something specific to Disney movies, 99.9999% of movies are 24 fps

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Its true that a solid 60 fps with no framedrops can feel very fluent, normally that needs motion blur then however.  a smooth 50 fps feels better than a microstuttery 100 fps but you certainly notice high fps. Focus on moving parts at the sides/top/bottom of the screen in movies, you will see them almost stand still for some time ;)

 

OT:

BeastyBaiters suggestions seem to be rather good to go by, as it sounds to me.

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...Wow Jade - you said the exact same statement I made - 

Disney's animated feature films work on 24 frames per second - have you ever seen a stutter watching Bambi? 

Here is what I am saying - If you have a solid 30 FPS - with no peeks and valleys, your experience will be just as good with 100 FPS or 1000 FPS with no peaks and valleys. My very good friend is an ophthalmologist, according to him is the "hiccups" in frames rate when they drop is what were see as stuttering. In gaming, CPU processing delays (... like the building pop ups and explosions) - which is why I said CPU processor speed is important (...again you quoted what I already said) - also this is more so the BCLK (Bus Clock) example 100 MHz (BCLK) x 48 (Clock Multiplier) = 4.8GHz but so is 105 MHz (BCLK) x 46 (Clock Multiplier) = 4.8GHz - the latter will give you better FPS because of a faster Bus Clock.

LOL...are you MAD?!!!...there is MASSIVE difference between 30fps and 100fps it is not about ayes ,its about input lag and latency,30fps its like swimming thru the gel,games ere not movies,you need at least 60fps. 

  • Upvote 1

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