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Bf-109 E-7 / E-7/N

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How many E-7/N where actually used on eastern front?

Or its more common to have DB601A version?

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Hey VikS!

 

I asked Oleg Maddox this question back when they introduced the E-7/N to IL2, and he told me this type was used only by Romania on the Eastern Front.

 

EDIT: I meant the E-7/Z. My mistake. 

Edited by LukeFF

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The last batches of E-7 in 1941 were appearantly all DB 601N powered, however its difficult to track down which went to what unit... furthermore by the time of Barbarossa the units were rapidly switching over the the 109F series and the remaining Emils were quickly handed down Axis allies or operated as training machines, fighter bombers or as secondary areas of operation.

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In terms of secondary area of operations, the 109 E (7??) was used in Norway as late as March 1942.

This is evidenced from the book "I flew for the fuhrer" by Heinz Knoke. (I recently started reading accounts of Luftwaffe fighter pilots, after seeing a youtube video about "A higher call" which is a great book).

In it he records dates for events, once of which is having to do a force landing in Norway, and since he had his camera with him, he took a photo afterwards (included in the book). 

as we all know the production of the "F" series was delayed due to an issue that took time to work out (which is why the 109E was present at the time Germany invaded Russia), incidentally the Tempest or Typhoon had the exact same problem, and they solved it the same way as the Germans did.

His unit (that seemed to have gone from Norway to Jerver) didn't get the 109 "F" until quite late:

Entry for 2nd October 1942: " The me109 E was replaced several months ago by the 109F. A few days ago the first models of the "G" type started coming off the assembly lines."

Edited by novicebutdeadly

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Slovak Air Arms bought 27 emils from Germany and used them on eastern front in Majkop and Krasnodar area from november 42 to mid march 1943 as part of JG52 (13.slow.Staffel) Most succesfull fighter ace Jan Reznak with 32 confirmed kills made his first claim 17.1.1943 on this a/c  BF-109E (W.Nr. 12004) As I am not expert on this,someone maybe can tell from the nr. which model it is in fact.

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Apparantly almost everyone in the East was already flying F-1/F-2 by end of June 1941, see http://ww2.dk/oob/statistics/se28641.htm

 

Problem is that I believe the list above doesnt really ID exact subtype, unless it was equipped with GM-1 (only in West JG), but photographic evidence for example shows large "N" labels on top engine cowling of Desert Bf 109Es of JG 27..

 

JG 77 was one of the last units to use the Emil, but their units also switched to F type in July - December 1941... they were stationed in the South front, ie. near Rumania, so perhaps thats how the Rumanians got their handed down (ex-JG 77) Emils with 601N...

 

http://ww2.dk/air/jagd/jg77.htm

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The last batches of E-7 in 1941 were appearantly all DB 601N powered, however its difficult to track down which went to what unit... furthermore by the time of Barbarossa the units were rapidly switching over the the 109F series and the remaining Emils were quickly handed down Axis allies or operated as training machines, fighter bombers or as secondary areas of operation.

 

 

Sch.G.1 and III./ZG1 used them.

 

bf-109e-7-b-maj-alfred-druschel-gruppenk

 

 

 

wespen_bf109_04.jpg

6.jpg

  • Upvote 2

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One more thing - 

 

anyone know why some 109E-s had horizontal spacer in in its oil cooler channel - but some others didnt?

 

E-3-E-7_oil_cooler_intake.jpg

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I hope only BOS Emil will be not so slow like Russian charts says  ( 450 kph at deck ) :P

 

Emils was more close to 500 kph  at the deck with 601A/Aa  1.4/1.45 Ata  or 601N  1.35 Ata.

Edited by 303_Kwiatek

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One more thing - 

 

anyone know why some 109E-s had horizontal spacer in in its oil cooler channel - but some others didnt?

 

attachicon.gifE-3-E-7_oil_cooler_intake.jpg

The horizontal spacer was moveable to close the cooler, the middle metal piece (at the top of the intake) is formed that way that i would not block the lit when closing (your left picture). No such regulation was typical for the bf109 e3 

 

Might be due to a field mod. 

Edited by =]VLA[=Ravonmith

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Many E-3s and E-1s left from the BoB were modernized with field modifications to match the E-7 model. Those however differed technicly from each other and were not identical to the E-7 production versions.

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The horizontal spacer was moveable to close the cooler, the middle metal piece (at the top of the intake) is formed that way that i would not block the lit when closing (your left picture). No such regulation was typical for the bf109 e3 

 

Might be due to a field mod. 

 

well, the problem - that its fixed and cant be moved

 

E-3-E-7_oil_cooler_intake_2.jpg

 

?

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I've ressearched a little on the shown machines.

 

The first one with the questioned inlet fan blade was an E-1 originally refitted and modernized to an E-3 in 1940.

 

The second one was an E-3 shot down and emergency landing on british territory. During a process of rebuilding one entire wing, the engine cowling as well as well as a new prop the machine was test flown until late 1941. After the war it was restrored back to it's original condition with a remade cowling mockup.

 

Couldn't find any evidence on this inlet fan blade / flap yet. I've googled some pictures of E-1s and E-3s and some of them have the same cowling installation.

Edited by Stab/JG26_5tuka

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How many E-7/N where actually used on eastern front?

Or its more common to have DB601A version?

 

The last batches of E-7 in 1941 were appearantly all DB 601N powered, however its difficult to track down which went to what unit... furthermore by the time of Barbarossa the units were rapidly switching over the the 109F series and the remaining Emils were quickly handed down Axis allies or operated as training machines, fighter bombers or as secondary areas of operation.

 

I collected a series of photos of:

 

1941:

I./JG77

II./JG77

I.(Jagd)/LG2

II.(Schlacht)/LG2

 

1942

III./ZG1

I./Schl.G.1

13.(Slow)/JG52

15.(Kroat)/JG52

Romanian Grupul 7 Van.

 

All show "87" as fuel, so it is DB601A engine towards to the end of 1942 - Stalingrad (Schl.G.1 + Gr.7Van.) and Africa (III./ZG1).

  • Upvote 1

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I collected a series of photos of:

 

1941:

I./JG77

II./JG77

I.(Jagd)/LG2

II.(Schlacht)/LG2

 

1942

III./ZG1

I./Schl.G.1

13.(Slow)/JG52

15.(Kroat)/JG52

Romanian Grupul 7 Van.

 

All show "87" as fuel, so it is DB601A engine towards to the end of 1942 - Stalingrad (Schl.G.1 + Gr.7Van.) and Africa (III./ZG1).

 

Excellent work! The 87 octane triangle should definietely point to 601A/Aa series and no /N variants. It appears the latter have went to Afrika/W. Europe.

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