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Tball

What about pedals?

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Hi All

 

I have considered buying some pedals to improve my aim in certain situations.

But will it be an improvement over my Trustmaster t16000m rudder axis?

 

Thanks!

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They take a bit of getting used to initially but once they click they're much better than a twist stick in my opinion. Definitely worth a purchase if you have the spare cash. 

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You can just start from here

 

http://forum.il2sturmovik.com/topic/5445-mfg-crosswind-rudder-pedals-review-simhq/?hl=%2Bcrosswind&do=findComment&comment=121030

 

the Crosswind pedals, a nice piece of hardware.

 

AA_Engadin

Edited by AA_Engadin
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The Crosswinds looks nice. What about Zaitek`s pro combat pedals?

 

Does pedals vs joystick zaxis really make that great a difference?

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I have the Saitek Combat Pedals, have been using them for over 2 years now and really like them, doing well for me.

 

However, if/when I can come up with an excuse, I will get the Crosswinds.

 

But yes, pedals are well worth having - as mentioned at first will seem a little awkward likely, but once you get used to them they become kind of second nature and more realistic to have as well.

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flying without pedals is like driving without feet ;)

No it isn't.

I've been using a twist axis for rudder for many years - works just fine.

Whatever you're accustomed to.

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Pedals are fun and also give you better control over small precise action that's more difficult with the small range of a twisting stick. They will improve your flying as well as your aim.

You also get some extra axis in the toe brakes you can assign to that function or even other commands.

Frees up some of your HOTAS buttons for other things. If your budget allows, go for it. You won't regret having them.

Tip. Put some rubber flooring or shelf liner under them so they'll stick to the floor and not slide when you step on them.

Edited by SharpeXB

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The Crosswinds looks nice. What about Zaitek`s pro combat pedals?

 

Does pedals vs joystick zaxis really make that great a difference?

I just bought these pedals along with an X-55.  The next step up in price and quality are crosswinds. but man. I cant justify that much.  200 was enough.

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Thanks for all the replies :)

I don't know if I am going to buy one, since I don't know if my current economy and time spend on flying can justify it.

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Switching to pedals (in my case Saitek) was like this:

 

For the first week or so you're flying as if you're drunk, and I mean hideously-outrageously-drunk. Then it'll  start getting better bit by bit, especially after getting used to the movement range and reactions of the pedals and fiddling with input settings (if necessary). After a few weeks it becomes natural and you begin to wonder how the heck you could have flown without them so long. ;)

Edited by csThor
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Pedals make a lot of difference and although good ones are expensive it may be worth waiting and saving up, any pedals with old style pots will reasonably quickly start to spike and that is then worse than no pedals.

 

I think the Saiteks may have Hal pots but if you can afford them the Crosswinds sound brilliant, I have Simpeds which cost quite a bit when they were available, they are damn good, but those with Crosswinds seem to notice the improvement, for me pedals are the difference in being able to hit an enemy plane or being able to hit the pilot in the enemy plane.

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Switching to pedals (in my case Saitek) was like this:

 

For the first week or so you're flying as if you're drunk, and I mean hideously-outrageously-drunk. Then it'll  start getting better bit by bit, especially after getting used to the movement range and reactions of the pedals and fiddling with input settings (if necessary). After a few weeks it becomes natural and you begin to wonder how the heck you could have flown without them so long. ;)

 

I back each and every word but this time applied to TrackIR  :lol:  . Expecting same sort of comments on the Oculus Rift device experience for sure.  :biggrin:

 

AA_Engadin

Edited by AA_Engadin

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I've got CH pedals and I love them. CsThor is quite right. You need to be careful about sensitivity or you'll be skewing around all over the place.

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My first pedals, some 15 yrs ago, were the Thrustmaster RCS. I really lovel their sturdiness, but they didn't have the toe brakes.

Then I got the CH RCS. Not bad at all, but too loose, for my taste.

 

IRL, the yaw axis is by far the more demanding in terms of forces required. In the gliders I fly there are significative diferences in the amount of rudder input required, but common to all of them is the more significative force you have to use in your legs / feet to actuate on them, as opposed to the very sensitive "stick".

 

Ideally IMO the rudder controller should allow for variable tension, to better suite them for diferente uses. For instance, when I fly the helicopters in DCS World, I like to have them loose, but for IL2, DCS World P51d or Condorsoaring, tension is required. That's why I went for the Saitek, but after not more than 4 months using them, the tension mechanism became rather ineficiente, and presently no matter how much I turn the Spring (?) tension wheel, the end result is very very faint :-(  Other than that, I like the Saitek rudder pedals.

 

"Flying" a combat flight simulador with twist grip puts you so far away from the realistic sensation and outcome of using rudder pedals that you'll feel in heavens once you get one of those :-)

Edited by jcomm

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Reading all the comments make me want those pedals :)

The question is; is the Saitek Combat Pro Pedals good enough? Those are quite affordable in my country.

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Reading all the comments make me want those pedals :)

The question is; is the Saitek Combat Pro Pedals good enough? Those are quite affordable in my country.

 

Yes they are, probably my preferred among the 3 I had - thrustmaster, ch1 and saitek - but Forget about the tension adjustment - it becomes useless / inneficient after a short while!

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Reading all the comments make me want those pedals :)

The question is; is the Saitek Combat Pro Pedals good enough? Those are quite affordable in my country.

 

Absolutely they are good enough, especially coming from having no pedals.

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Bought pedals myself, used them twice and realized that twist stick is way more accurate. Maby i should add, for me.

 

Could be that the rudder pedals i used where useless with rock hard springs making my legs and ankles hurt after 5 min and mm adjustments to my aim impossible.

Edited by Baron

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IMO pedals do not drastically improve accuracy and it's a funny experience getting used to them. But once it used to them you won't go back

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Go with CH products pedals. They are very robust and heavy (the base not the pedals so it doesn't slide around) and they are equipped with toe brakes. I've had mine for almost 2 years and they still work fantastic.

Edited by RDW

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I have the CH ones as well and I find them very erratic, spiking and prone to sticking off centre.

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Go with CH products pedals. They are very robust and heavy (the base not the pedals so it doesn't slide around) and they are equipped with toe brakes. I've had mine for almost 2 years and they still work fantastic.

I've been using CH Pro Pedals for about 4 years of heavy use and they still feel like new. Their stuff is really solid as they make industrial and military controllers as well.

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Is the CH Pedals Pro better than the Saitek Combat Pro Pedals?

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Using the Saitek Combat Pedals.(not pro) for 2 years and I'm not regreting them. Of course they are the cheapest ones (110 Euro) and surely are somewhat overpriced, they still add the noticbly emersion and controlebility making up for more enjoyable and irnteresting flying.

 

Can't agree on twist being superiour or more accurate since you usually are able to adjust resisdence of your pedals as well as have way bigger input area than on normal joystick.

 

More important than the advantage you get ones used to them is the fun factor though, which is why i wholeheartly recommend them.

 

Depending on your budget it might be recommended to get some more expensive ones though as my combat pedals already show first signs of usage (leveler to change resisldence doesnt work anymore and theres a little deadzone).

Edited by [Jg26]5tuk4

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Just bought rudder pedals last week and have to say it´s definitely much better.  :salute:

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I'm not better pilot with pedals (compared to twiststick i was used over 10 years) but with them, flying feels WAY more realistic and fun. Once you get used to them, there's no turning back.

Saitek Pro pedals here.

Edited by DB605

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Been using twist for years and do great with it - but I wouldn't mind a set of pedals.

Might have to start planting the seed with the wife for next birthday...

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I think the Saiteks may have Hal pots

In resume

 

CH PRO Pedals - Potentiometers (good quality, durable) - 8 bits (256 resolution points) USB 1.1 controller (old "end of 90's - last century"  technology). :)

SAITEK Pedals (any*) - Potentiometers (good, but cheap versions) - 12 bits (4096 resolution points) USB controller

MFG Crosswind - MagRez sensor in Yaw axis, HALL sensor in brakes - both in analog mode - 12 bits (4096 resolution points) USB controller

Slaw Device - MagRez sensor in Yaw, brakes axis - in digital mode - 12 bits (4096 resolution points) USB controller

VKB T-Rudder - D-MaRS sensor in Yaw axis - in digital mode - 10 Bit (1024) USB controller (based on YT video)

VKB RDRXXI - DMaRS sensor in Yaw an (some models) in brakes - 12 bits (4092 resolution points) USB controller

 

The "Bit resolution" is the allowed by USB controller, maybe some axis dont use all due movement restriction. Not big deal.

 

* All Saitek models are the same pedal (base/electronics) with different foot rest. One should not expect a ~2x better model because are paying ~ twice price in metal or Cessna design footrest . ;)

 

Sokol1

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I ended up buying the Saitek Pro Flight Rudder Pedals, which are cheaper than the combat ones.

I couldn't justify buying the crosswinds, maybe in the future... :)

 

Thanks for all the help and detailed answers. This is indeed a great community.

Edited by Tball

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I myself have the Combat ones, but good choice they should serve you well.

No issues with mine so far.

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