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Timed navigation for 'Noobs' - reference tables


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Guest deleted@210880

The best servers for me are those with no map ‘GPS’ help, I think they are actually slightly ‘safer’ for ground attackers and slightly ‘easier’ for those with less skill (like me) because the ace fighters have to spend at least some of their time navigating, therefore there is a slightly lower chance of them finding and spotting you and maybe you will get lucky whilst they are looking at their map… but that’s just personal opinion.

 

However it can be hard to navigate on the maps, continuously using landmarks alone works for many places, but in some of the Moscow map for example this can be a nightmare, and if you are continuously looking for landmarks you’re putting less time into seeing the enemy (unless you have a squad/wingman of course). So I use distance and speed to get an estimate of time and it seems to work well enough. There’s an excellent app I believe you can use but I loathe having to tap and swipe things and I don’t have two screens so, as my mental arithmetic is not the best, instead I use a printed reference table and estimate from that.

 

1)      Each map square is 10km wide and 15km (near enough) across the diagonal so I can measure distances approximately on the map.

 

2)      Then noting my speed I can read the time it will take to cover the distance

 

3)      Then use the aircraft clock I can track the time. If it all goes wel,l at the expected time you should be near enough to your expected location.

 

I find this gives a good enough result to get to targets as a low ground attacker and not get lost most of the time.

 

So here are two versions of a basic reference table (one is rounded to nearest minute).

 

Just find your speed down the side, and the distance you are to cover along the top and see how long it’s going to take you. Included is also a ‘km covered in a single minute’.

 

This method obviously doesn’t take into account wind or altitude but isn’t intended or claimed to be exact, but just enough to not get too lost, too often.

Nav_times.jpg

Nav_times_rounded.jpg

Added another table because i was intrigued at the idea of flying by set speeds of 60kmh

 

Nav_times_alternative.jpg

Edited by deleted@210880
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To expand on this excellent post, there is a RL fighter pilot navigation technique of planning and flying your mission at an airspeed that is a multiple of 60. Pick one of the following multiples of 60: 240, 300, 360, 420, 480, or 540 units/h.  These speeds are fairly easy to convert to 4 units/min, 5 units/min, 6 units/min, 7 units/min...you get the idea.

 

1GCCFPs flying US or British airplanes have a challenge of taking an extra moment (perhaps offline) to calculate "ballpark" enroute times from their base to their target. The navigation burden is made a little easier for these folks if they focus on internalizing how long it takes to cover a grid square at 240 mph (a comfortable A-20 speed), 300 mph or 360 mph.

 

For example extrapolating from your charts. 240 mph will take just over 1:30 to cross a 10 km grid square E to W or N to S. 300 mph will take about 1:15 to cross a grid square. Not from your chart, but 360 mph will take just over 1 minute.

 

Armed with this, once in game I can call up the map. I place a thumb at one grid intersection and my pointer finger at the grid above...that's my "ballpark" combat plotter/ruler. Without zooming in or out, I move my finger and thumb however many times to cover the distance from my base to the target or my present position to the target. Now it's a matter of counting out loud or to yourself as you move your finger/thumb plotter across the map...for 240 mph..."Minute thirty, three minutes, four thirty, six minutes." It's not exact but it's mo'debly close enough for government work.

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34 minutes ago, busdriver said:

To expand on this excellent post, there is a RL fighter pilot navigation technique of planning and flying your mission at an airspeed that is a multiple of 60. Pick one of the following multiples of 60: 240, 300, 360, 420, 480, or 540 units/h.  These speeds are fairly easy to convert to 4 units/min, 5 units/min, 6 units/min, 7 units/min...you get the idea.

 

1GCCFPs flying US or British airplanes have a challenge of taking an extra moment (perhaps offline) to calculate "ballpark" enroute times from their base to their target. The navigation burden is made a little easier for these folks if they focus on internalizing how long it takes to cover a grid square at 240 mph (a comfortable A-20 speed), 300 mph or 360 mph.

 

For example extrapolating from your charts. 240 mph will take just over 1:30 to cross a 10 km grid square E to W or N to S. 300 mph will take about 1:15 to cross a grid square. Not from your chart, but 360 mph will take just over 1 minute.

 

Armed with this, once in game I can call up the map. I place a thumb at one grid intersection and my pointer finger at the grid above...that's my "ballpark" combat plotter/ruler. Without zooming in or out, I move my finger and thumb however many times to cover the distance from my base to the target or my present position to the target. Now it's a matter of counting out loud or to yourself as you move your finger/thumb plotter across the map...for 240 mph..."Minute thirty, three minutes, four thirty, six minutes." It's not exact but it's mo'debly close enough for government work.

Tiny Brain: Outfit multi-million dollar jets with ludicrously expensive complex inertial guidance systems, GPS, and complex sensor suites.
Galaxy Brain: Make your hotshot pilots use their hands to eyeball it, and plough the money into moar missiles.

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2 hours ago, RedKestrel said:

Tiny Brain: Outfit multi-million dollar jets with ludicrously expensive complex inertial guidance systems, GPS, and complex sensor suites.

 

Mais non, mon ami. I was a Jurassic Era fighter pilot, the INS (inertial navigation system) in the Phantom prior to ARN-101 ("Arnie") had an acceptable drift error of 3 NM per hour.  The A model Viper had an acceptable drift error of 1.5 NM. All the bombs that fell off my airplane were dumb. I have an abiding love of maps marked up with black lines from one turnpoint (a nickle sized circle) with stopwatch times and an arrow with my course to the next, short perpendicular marks denoting each minute, a square to denote the IP and triangle to denote the target.

 

Working backwards from landing with minimum fuel, calculate the fuel you need to fly the mission as planned. Use a plotter (think ruler) that's marked in thousand pounds of fuel increments for your planned groundspeed and drag configuration. Note those amounts by each turnpoint as you work back to the start point. Write that amount as the minimum required to fly the mission as planned. The difference between your actual total fuel available when you start the route and your minimum required is the amount of burner time you have available. At the farthest point from your intended landing airfield write BINGO and the amount of fuel to fly directly to that field, understand whether this is a low, medium, or high altitude Bingo. Piece of cake.😎

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I have a bloke sat behind me in my PE-2 but he only talks to me in Russian, so he could be giving me directions but I'm not sure. I really enjoy the challenge of navigating to a target by sticking to a bearing and aiming for landmarks etc but I know I'm doing it in a very simplistic way so this discussion is helpful. I'd love to see some in game tools to help though.

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