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WWII "Pitch Out" Landing Pattern


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Hey gang,

 

Anyone have a reference to how the various WWII Air Forces flew the overhead pattern? I am familiar with the WWII USN Carrier Pattern, but not the specific procedures for the land based operations, which seem to employ a low altitude pass followed by an aggressive pitch up to downwind in order to bleed speed. 

 

Anyone have the basic altitudes and pattern procedures? I've not come across anything using the using the various search engines.

 

Thanks in advance.

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20 minutes ago, Blitzen said:

YES!

 

Umm, that's not WWII.

 

Here's a landing pattern image translated from a Ju 88 manual:

 

J-88-06.jpg

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23 hours ago, Victory205 said:

Anyone have the basic altitudes and pattern procedures? I've not come across anything using the using the various search engines.

 

1852230887_P-47trafficpattern.jpg.adfaefdaf61008ba2d5caf02071dd780.jpg

 

686681447_P-51trafficpattern00.thumb.jpg.49b593da6eecad810e58f11d5f47a6c4.jpg

 

640009666_P-51trafficpattern01.thumb.jpg.f4225b503aa6538912782c169f7cb2da.jpg

 

1680005659_P-51trafficpattern02.jpg.6b2e050e4711703737c3a54703250138.jpg

 

 

 

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Guys, the OP is asking for a specific fighter landing approach that was sometimes used to avoid being caught by enemies while in the pattern.

Never seen it published busdriver, but I have seen guys do it online. Tried it myself before and got it horribly wrong!

 

Basically, instead of a downwind leg, hammer low along the runway, downwind, at speed then when past it a suitable distance pull up vertically. When the speed is bled off begin an Immelman, drop gear and flaps and once facing down again come down to land. Being careful not to pick up too much speed again and rip the gear off!

 

I don't fly fighters often enough to practice it and an attempt with the Hurri was iffy to say the least.

Cheers.

 

PS Luke's example is for landing a Ju88 with one engine. I keep meaning to see if it works.

Edited by 216th_Cat
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There's always this:  😉

 

A very old video. Showing three things: 

 

1) You can get away with all sorts of things in a Yak

2) IL-2 GB graphics have improved (though to be fair, I'm using better hardware now)

3) I was just as stupid then as I am now, and probably more reckless.

 

Seriously though, the 'pile in low and fast, pull hard to bleed your speed, and dump it on the runway' technique works well enough, and you don't actually need to roll out at the top of a half-loop while lowering your landing gear to do it. Even if it looks cool that way.

 

I think that in the context this technique should be used - landing while there may be enemy about to pounce on you if you hang around too long - the details don't really matter. What does matter is situational awareness (e.g. looking out for some other idiot doing the same thing,  in the opposite direction) and knowing the limits of your aircraft.

 

 

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I flew out of a mixed use military base for years and the F-18's that flew in there routinely did high speed break turns over the centerline to set up their landings. When the Angels were in town it was suprisingly by the numbers and full pattern landings.

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5 hours ago, 216th_Cat said:

Basically, instead of a downwind leg, hammer low along the runway, downwind, at speed then when past it a suitable distance pull up vertically. When the speed is bled off begin an Immelman, drop gear and flaps and once facing down again come down to land.

 

Nah...the pitchup maneuver is what USAF pilots know as a pitchback. Think of it as an Immelmann (goes uphill) on an angle. Having said that, the desired objective is where the flight will wind up on downwind with an adequate interval.  If you've bled off your airspeed you can't go uphill.

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The most interesting thing about the Angels is they brought a portable/ground based arrester system and anchored it to the runway every year. Never used it but always set it up.

 

Edited by II/JG17_HerrMurf
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Thanks JimTM, that’s what I was looking for- the climbing pitch out that was used by USAAF fighters circa WWII. Very much appreciated. Trust me, I already know how to do the “modern” carrier and field level 360 overhead pattern. 😉

Edited by Victory205
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2 hours ago, Victory205 said:

Thanks JimTM, that’s what I was looking for- the climbing pitch out that was used by USAAF fighters circa WWII. Very much appreciated. Trust me, I already know how to do the “modern” carrier and field level 360 overhead pattern. 😉

 

Thanks to Requiem for creating videos for...you name it!  :salute:

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  • 3 weeks later...

Here is one with 2 flights of aircraft. Returning from a PWCG Campaign flight we're running as a coop.

From the time the first plane arrives at the runway to 8th plane touchdown is 3 1/2 min actual elapsed time.

 

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On 1/30/2021 at 5:51 AM, busdriver said:

Style points to the second four-ship arriving together. Style points for staggered/alternating sides of the runway.:salute:

 

I'm going to like that post just because I was in the second four ship, and I'm self indulgent from time to time :dance:🤣

 

We'll ignore the fact that I was the only one that bounced slightly, but in my defence I was managing a flak hit right engine, with low oil pressure and fading power.

Edited by DD_fruitbat
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Somewhere in my books about LuftWaffe I have seen notes about a fast low pass in order to let the FLAK and base spotters check the six before making a steep climb to bleed speed and then reverse for landing but at the moment I can't find it.

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2 hours ago, DD_fruitbat said:

We'll ignore the fact that I was the only one that bounced slightly, but in my defence I was managing a flak hit right engine, with low oil pressure and fading power.

 

I saw that...and noticed your airplane was damaged. FWIW everybody looked fast on final (not wanting to clog the pattern behind them I reckon) that's why IMO several guys floated down the runway. It still looked very cool. :salute:

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