Jump to content

Feelin' kinda like Mister Magoo in VR...


Recommended Posts

12 minutes ago, Todt_Von_Oben said:

Keith Richards

i know the G - but I dont use it very much .... But now we talk about it  ..allso ... And Mick Taylor on guitar -- 1973

and If you not have the Oakland concert I have it  ;)     

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, J5_NiiranenVR-Gfr said:

and If you not have the Oakland concert I have it  ;)     

 

Do you mean the Jimi Hendrix' Oakland concert at the Colosseum in 1969?  I heard part of an audio version of that thirty years ago but I don't think I have it in my collection.  Is that what you have?  Hope so! To quote Willie in THE BLUE MAX, that is "hard to get."  

 

I've got Jimi's videos like ALBERT HALL, SWEDISH EROTICA, and others.  Have you ever seen A FILM ABOUT JIMI HENDRIX?  Best documentary ever.  Let me know about that Oakland concert.  Maybe we can work a trade.  :good:

 

I was there.  Jimi took the microphone at one point and said, "We're going to play a song by the Fresh Cream called Sunshine of Your Love.  We're not saying we play it any better or worse than anyone else; we just like the song, okay?"

 

And then he proceded to blow Eric Clapton's version completely and totally away.  BAAAAD!!!  :biggrin:

 

ADDIT:  Now that I'm thinking about trades; I've got some things (not music related) you (or others) might be interested in.

 

Several old twist sticks; MS and Saitek.

 

A functional Dell laptop with an MS twist stick, RB3D, WOFF, and Full Canvas Jacket.  Works just like it did back in the day.

 

Several aviation, submarine, and tank PC games from WWII.  

 

All Versions of RB, RB2, and RB3D.

 

Maybe others.  Ask.  :salute:

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
Link to post
Share on other sites

No no  .... Karma sir  .... ;) 

You can buy that concert today  on a cd  https://thecdvault.com/product/jimi-hendrix-live-at-the-oakland-coliseum-cd-12-page-booklet/       or other place 

 

I dont know wether my quality is the same as that , maybe re mixed album .... I have it as a single mp3 fil ' the hole concert .... 78 mb 

 

I can send it to you  ... email 

 

i have around on my pc 25 GB with hendrix ...mp3 /flac  ...so ....

 

there many places like the sugarmegs I send ,and also one here http://theultimatebootlegexperience7.blogspot.com/search/label/Jimi Hendrix  its Torrent  

 

but dont forget your massage seat  ;)  

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, J5_NiiranenVR-Gfr said:

No no  .... Karma sir  .... ;) 

You can buy that concert today  on a cd  https://thecdvault.com/product/jimi-hendrix-live-at-the-oakland-coliseum-cd-12-page-booklet/       or other place 

 

I dont know wether my quality is the same as that , maybe re mixed album .... I have it as a single mp3 fil ' the hole concert .... 78 mb 

 

I can send it to you  ... email 

 

i have around on my pc 25 GB with hendrix ...mp3 /flac  ...so ....

 

there many places like the sugarmegs I send ,and also one here http://theultimatebootlegexperience7.blogspot.com/search/label/Jimi Hendrix  its Torrent  

 

but dont forget your massage seat  ;)  

 

Man!  That's GREAT!  Thank you!  I'll check those URL's and if it's different from your MP3: yes, I'd like that too, please.  

 

I flew Flugpark a couple times again this morning; BK working intermittently.  It'll go between 20 and 30 minutes and then goes into red-light standby mode.  Comes back on unexpectedly after a few minutes.  Takes a little getting used to.  I still "flinch" as if my engine just quit.  But no!  The tachometer says it's still running! 

 

(Except at the end of my first D7F flight today; where my engine got hit and eventually quit.  Saved the plane.)

 

The BK quit again when I was flying the Dr.1.  Then, I was working on a bot Camel when a bot Albatros came out of nowhere and collided with my plane; taking off the top and bottom right wings.  I got knocked inverted; don't know what happened to him.  Got it upright but it was bucking like a bronco.  Still  had the engine and prop but guidance became a matter of trying to maintain a nose-high knife-edge attitude while continuously re-balancing extreme control and power inputs.  Looking around, I was near their aerodrome and headed west.  Ach, schnit!  :(

 

Getting it turned around east and back across the mud took a lot of work.  I lost it and recovered twice.  Once I was back over our green; I bailed and landed in a crater at the edge of the mud.  As soon as I left, the plane augered-in.  I was lucky to get back and there wasn't any way I could have landed that wreck.

 

The BK was working again when I jumped.  The difference between cockpit noise and the silence of the saddle is physically palpable through the BK.  Really adds a lot to VR.

 

Gotta get my JetPad working.  

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
Link to post
Share on other sites

You're driving it too hard.  If the BK is constantly flicking that red light on and off every time something goes boom or buzzes, it will eventually overheat and shut down until it cools, similar to what you are describing.  I try to keep my gain at the lowest threshold I can get by with and still feel it.  The tactile cues you receive don't have to be massive, and I don't like my chair feeling like one of those coin-operated vibrating beds in a cheap motel!

Edited by SeaSerpent
typo
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, SeaSerpent said:

You're driving it too hard.  If the BK is constantly flicking that red light on and off every time something goes boom or buzzes, it will eventually overheat and shut down until it cools, similar to what you are describing.  I try to keep my gain at the lowest threshold I can get by with and still feel it.  The tactile cues you receive don't have to be massive, and I don't like my chair feeling like one of those coin-operated vibrating beds in a cheap motel!

 

Thanks for that, SS.  

 

I've set the "volume" down so the red light is mildly flickering most of the time; I thought that was the correct setting.  But the vibes do seem a little harsh and the unit does disengage after a while.

 

Thanks for the help; I'll try it next time I fly.

 

Prosit!  :salute:

 

ADDIT:  Sea Serpent is correct: I just flew a triplane at Flugpark; flew until I was out of ammo and it was a long flight back; had to restart my FR once midway.  Altogether between thirty about forty minutes.  I had the BK dialed down so no red lights were showing and it not only didn't balk, the vibrations of the engine and guns seemed better; more believable.

 

Problem solved.  Thanks SS.  :salute:

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
Link to post
Share on other sites

No problem.  Glad to help.  I'm a big fan of the Buttkicker and of Simshaker.  I couldn't sim without them.

 

A minor note, and not a big deal.  Please call me Sea Serpent or Serpent, but not "SS" because on a WW1/WW2 forum, people might get the wrong idea 😀

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, SeaSerpent said:

A minor note, and not a big deal.  Please call me Sea Serpent or Serpent, but not "SS" because on a WW1/WW2 forum, people might get the wrong idea 😀


Good thing you don't go by SeaAge, that would be a bad acronym (Shutzstafel in WW1 context is a honest to God word for a 1917 Halberstadt squadron ;) ) .

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, J2_Trupobaw said:

Hey hey, long time no passive aggressive💕!
Didn't miss it at all, with covid, workplace upheaval and everything. I heard it was missing me, though.

 

Not really....🤔

Link to post
Share on other sites

SeaSerpent: roger that; no SS.  

 

Thanks for the help.  I've spent about four hours a day the past couple days trying to get the JetPad / SimShaker working.  No joy.  I'm down to splitting the connector and checking 12V current from the power supply.  

 

If not that, then Andre has a post that says send him the Firmware log and he can figure it out.  It's something firmware-related, I think.  

 

I've gone down the list; checking every component and they are all supposedly listening to one another via Voicemeeter.  Everything looks right but when I do the recovery procedure and get to the point where I put the USB back in, it's being recognized but not connecting.  Can't even get a TEST tone.  

 

Gotta take some time off fiddling with it.  I'll fly with just the ButtKicker for a while.  It might not be as refined as the JetPad, but it adds the haptic experience and I really miss it when it's gone.  (Hasn't missed a beat since I got the red-light problem solved; thanks again.) 

 

Anyway, I've got a PUMA helicopter flight simulator being built for me; supposedly about five to seven weeks out.  I'll be flying a R22 in P3D at first.  Manufacturer says it's one USB "plug and play."  Men, I sure hope so!  :biggrin:

 

Prosit!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Todt_Von_Oben said:

Men, I sure hope so!  :biggrin:

 

Thank you sir. :salute: We stand behind you. Together we will beat this. We are strong, we are invincible. Hear us roar. We are men.

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/30/2020 at 7:19 AM, DD_Arthur said:

You’re in Hawaii? I hate you Todd! Where I live the rain falls horizontally and even the seagulls walk😢

 

BTW: getting back to this...  :)

 

The Hawaii I live in isn't like what you see on TV's Magnum PI and I'm not some rich dude driving a Ferrari in Honolulu.  My wife and I have been together 40 years and presently live in a rural area of the Big Island.  It's humble turf but we own it outright and earned what we have. 

 

Rain?  This is one of the rainiest spots on Earth.  Really funny, too.  Like in that movie, Back to the Future:  It will be pouring a roaring torrent on the roof one minute; and then just stop.   First night we spent in this house it did that and I was really surprised.  

 

I've seen the monsoons; this place doesn't rain quite that hard but pretty close sometimes.  It rains so hard it floods.  Hurricanes happen here, too.   Plus there's an active volcano a few miles away and everything we buy is more expensive because it has to be shipped in.  

 

Not much interest in my kind of music out here but it's a place where we found more privacy and freedom than we had on the mainland; living out in the country is nice.  When it's not storming, this place is beautiful.  

 

And then, there's the sea...  :yahoo:

 

Hawaii does have its share of environmental, economic, and societal problems.  It's not paradise but when I tally the pluses and minuses;  it's the best we've been able to do for ourselves so far and it works the time being.  Tomorrow?  No limits.  :cool:  

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

3 minutes ago, Todt_Von_Oben said:

And then, there's the sea...  :yahoo:

Oh yeah! Couldn’t live without it and can’t live far from it now😃

image.thumb.jpeg.83ce5caa82d3e66788e61a5772bb9405.jpeg

Where I live it’s that quiet time of year before the tourists return...if they ever do after this Covid mess is over.

image.thumb.jpeg.c3a48a2011fb7f44fa81981a39260872.jpeg

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I prefer life under the sea, but there's not many windows to appreciate the view. I'm told there's more planes at the bottom of the sea than there are submarines up in the sky.

I've made up my mind. I'm gonna order a buttkicker on top of my Realteus Forcefeel (different brand of JetSeat). Now I just need to decide what's the best way to do it? SimShaker allows for 1, 2 or 6 channels. I wonder what is the benefit of getting multiple bass shakers, and how hard it would be to set up?

Edited by gascan
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, gascan said:

Personally, I prefer life under the sea, but there's not many windows to appreciate the view. I'm told there's more planes at the bottom of the sea than there are submarines up in the sky.

I've made up my mind. I'm gonna order a buttkicker on top of my Realteus Forcefeel (different brand of JetSeat). Now I just need to decide what's the best way to do it? SimShaker allows for 1, 2 or 6 channels. I wonder what is the benefit of getting multiple bass shakers, and how hard it would be to set up?

 

Yep.  The sky and the sea, to me, are much the same.  I've been SCUBA diving since 1965 and sport skydiving since 1976; in both environments, it's like I can fly.  That's what I love about it.  

 

From what I hear, the ButtKicker is a great partner with the seat pad.  You can run more than one BK but as far as it being easy to set up and get working: I'm not qualified to speak.  Good luck!  :cool:

 

J5N sent me an audio recording of Jimi Hendrix' 1969 performance in Oakland.  Thanks so much!  Been looking for that for decades.  Brings back fond memories of my "wild and crazy" teenage years.  

 

And to try abstractly connecting all these thoughts: I was working on the haptics again last night when something cool happened.  

 

One thing we haven't liked about our set-up prior to this is, when I play back the FR, the audio only came through the Rift headset and my wife couldn't hear through the PC speakers.  BUT NOW, with Voicemeeter, it works both analog and digital.

 

(With me so far?  Okay, dig this... this is where it gets crazy.)

 

So last night I was rummaging around for connector cables and adapters when I came across the Spark amplifier I bought a few months ago.  I used the Y-adapter that comes with the Buttkicker to insert a secondary line linking the headphone jack to the Spark.  Now, when I play or show FR in either VR or 2D, I've not only got BK, I can also amplify the sound coming from FC1 and modify it with special audio effects available in the Spark amp.  

 

And if I want, I can branch off the Spark to run it all through my GNX4 music workstation and/or out through my 100 watt Marshall amp.  :lol:

 

It's good we live out in a forest.  I had no idea how LOUD the gunfire can be in this game.  And wait till FLAK goes off nearby when you're wired through, say, a reverb, phase shifter, or other guitar effects.  Whoa!  We're back at Zoo's Twilight Zone again!!!  :biggrin: 

 

Good fun.  Enjoy!  :good:

2044756524_SPARKAMPLIFIER.jpg.b888ff525d8d0a5b74706dd284e02520.jpg

 

 

 

ADDIT:  I just tried it with the Spark amp.  All it does is act like an amplifier; no additional effects going in through either the auxiliary input or the guitar plug jack.  Going in through AUX, we have volume but that's all.

 

Next, I'll break out my GNX4 music workstation and put some whammy bar on that FLAK.   :yahoo: 

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Todt_Von_Oben said:

 

Yep.  The sky and the sea, to me, are much the same.  I've been SCUBA diving since 1965 and sport skydiving since 1976; in both environments, it's like I can fly.  That's what I love about it. 

 

Hello from another jumper and diver! Not as long as you, though - jumping since 1990 (with a 16 year absence until I returned to jumping four years ago) and scuba since 2000 when my wife got me into it. Up until last year we dove in another warm-water country every year until last year... now awaiting a vaccine and our US passports being accepted again to head to warmer water. Diving here in Los Angeles is quite chilly - they never show how cold (60's F) the water here is on Baywatch 😁

 

I agree that both are like flying without those pesky airplanes!

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

CHARLO: Know whatcha mean about Cali cold water; grew up there.  White sharks, bull kelp, orange Garibaldi's, and sea otters that love to rip your mask and regulator off.  Colder than a witch's tit but that's why O'Neil makes wetsuits, right?  Oh yeah, and knobby knees.  All Cal surfers have knobbies from knee paddling.  I remember it well.  :good:

 

If in LA, then you jump Perris.  Did you know Jason Granger? He was a friend of a friend.  Sad loss.  :( 

 

I jumped and partied with the Know Sense people back when CRW was getting started.  Used my GI Bill to get 141 training and went on to fly planes for Perry Stevens, Bill Dause, George Morar, Dave Kleinhans, and others; mostly hauling jumpers, some instruction and XC pax and cargo in a D-18.  Owned and modified a gorgeous 1946 Luscombe 8E and was partners on two twin-Beech 18's.  Don't own a plane now, though. 

 

I flew for Bill "Indiana" Jones at Antioch when he first came from Colorado.  Ultimately, I told Bill he was "an accident waiting to happen" and quit flying for him.  He sold Antioch when the housing project closed in and went on to run the planes at Perris for a while; was responsible for that twin that spun-in because the unqualified pilot had contaminated fuel (from Bill's truck) and accidentally put the props in beta pitch when he had a problem on liftoff.  Cartwheeled it.  Killed everybody.  Sometimes, I hate to say I was right.  

 

But that's skydiving.  "Ya pays yer money and ya takes yer chances."  

 

The skydiving cheer, "Blue Sky?  BLACK DEATH!!"  I was there when Paul Landry invented it.   I'm a certificated Barehanded Wolf-Choker and Pterodactyl Breeder (courtesy of Uncle Zip), made Cardinal more than once, and I've got enough hairy-but true-stories from those days to write a book.  

 

But writing books these days is a waste of time; everybody's doing it and you get lost in the tidal wave.  So I just share my memories in places like this and hope people of like-mind will enjoy it.

 

BLUE SKY!  :salute:

 

 

3 hours ago, NO.20_W_M_Thomson said:

Man I can't wait to start shooting you guys up, kicking your butts all over the place lol.

 

Fat chance.  I love flying the Brisfit but I hate facing it as a foe.  I'll do it if I have to, but I've been known to avoid it in favor of one-seaters.  That stinger in the tail can be a real problem.  Depends on my mood: feeling crazy, I go after 'em.  Thinking about retirement, I run like a scared dog.  :yahoo:

 

That said, I'm actually looking forward to getting shot to pieces haptically and will keep an eye out for ya at the park.  :good:

 

As an afterthought: I think I'm able to get way to close to a F2B's six without getting killed.  I mean, I believe if I was a tailgunner in real life; I could shoot an attacker down a whole lot easier than the bot gunners are shooting me.  Not faulting the DM; just saying.  And I've seen evidence that's true because, when you get a human gunner riding along who knows his stuff, more often than not he's gonna cause you long-distance grief and blow you away if you get close. 

 

Again: not faulting the DM or the bots.  Just saying when I attack a Brisfit, I get away with being a lot more bold than I honestly feel I should.

 

Hell of a plane, the Beast.  My favorite flavor of Lime, actually.  But fight it?  Thanks, but I hear mommy callin'.   :cool:

 

ADDIT: Just flew the ButtKicker at Flugpark: Dr1.  I got an SE5A and a Camel over on their side of the mud.  

 

Started to leave but then saw someone else tangling so I headed that way.  

 

Was able to distinguish between the brightly colored Alby and the dark green Entente plane from a distance, so when he was crossing my path I hit him with a long deflection shot and it was on.  

 

But it wasn't a Camel this time.  It was a Brisfit.  

 

I thought about leaving but this must be one of my crazy days because I stayed and he went down.  I had about 100 rounds left in each gun by that time so I headed east.  

 

Right as I was getting back to our side of the mud, I looked up and noticed the Flight Recorder was off.  I turned it back on, thinking it had run out at 30 minutes.   At the end of that recording I immortalized a decent landing at Breyells.  (sp?)

 

But those dogfights?  Gone!  I hadn't taken off from a base; I started airborne in the dogfight area and forgot to turn the Flight Recorder on.  Schnit!  

 

Did fight a Brisfit and lived to tell of it, though.  :cool:

 

 

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Todt_Von_Oben said:

I mean, I believe if I was a tailgunner in real life; I could shoot an attacker down a whole lot easier than the bot gunners are shooting me.

We do have a couple of human rear gunners so be careful of them, They are good. 

I know McGoun is right into this VR thing, Not sure if he has a butt kicker or looking into it, he also was mentioning a vest thing too as well as some ankle gadget for VR. He does a lot of VR games though. Even fishing. but he loves killing zombies and ball room dancing lol.   

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Todt_Von_Oben said:

CHARLO: Know whatcha mean about Cali cold water; grew up there.  White sharks, bull kelp, orange Garibaldi's, and sea otters that love to rip your mask and regulator off.  Colder than a witch's tit but that's why O'Neil makes wetsuits, right?  Oh yeah, and knobby knees.  All Cal surfers have knobbies from knee paddling.  I remember it well.  :good:

 

If in LA, then you jump Perris.  Did you know Jason Granger? He was a friend of a friend.  Sad loss.  :( 

 

I jumped and partied with the Know Sense people back when CRW was getting started.  Used my GI Bill to get 141 training and went on to fly planes for Perry Stevens, Bill Dause, George Morar, Dave Kleinhans, and others; mostly hauling jumpers, some instruction and XC pax and cargo in a D-18.  Owned and modified a gorgeous 1946 Luscombe 8E and was partners on two twin-Beech 18's.  Don't own a plane now, though. 

 

I flew for Bill "Indiana" Jones at Antioch when he first came from Colorado.  Ultimately, I told Bill he was "an accident waiting to happen" and quit flying for him.  He sold Antioch when the housing project closed in and went on to run the planes at Perris for a while; was responsible for that twin that spun-in because the unqualified pilot had contaminated fuel (from Bill's truck) and accidentally put the props in beta pitch when he had a problem on liftoff.  Cartwheeled it.  Killed everybody.  Sometimes, I hate to say I was right.  

 

But that's skydiving.  "Ya pays yer money and ya takes yer chances."  

 

The skydiving cheer, "Blue Sky?  BLACK DEATH!!"  I was there when Paul Landry invented it.   I'm a certificated Barehanded Wolf-Choker and Pterodactyl Breeder (courtesy of Uncle Zip), made Cardinal more than once, and I've got enough hairy-but true-stories from those days to write a book.  

 

But writing books these days is a waste of time; everybody's doing it and you get lost in the tidal wave.  So I just share my memories in places like this and hope people of like-mind will enjoy it.

 

BLUE SKY!  :salute:

 

Yep, I jump at Perris a couple weekend days a month - this Saturday we're having our annual Rumble Rules 10-way competition - my favorite type of skydiving, no contact diving and hard docking!  I loved the few times I did CRW, and it's less-common at Perris and Elsinore than it used to be, so I haven't done it since the late 90s.  Wanna get back into it, though.

 

Of the folk you listed I only met Bill Dause (but who hasn't?). I never knew Bill Jones personally, but knew his son Jeff, who I think now manages the DZ at Taft. I drove out to Perris the night Papa Victor crashed in '93, just to be together with friends (I knew a couple of the jumpers who died). By the way, six of the 22 on board survived, and one of them is even leading my 10-way team this Saturday - but he went through a helluva recovery before he roared back and won some 4-way world championships. 

 

You do have some great stories! "Blue skies, Black Death!" is still one of my favorite cheers, but has become rarely heard with the focus on safety these last 20 years - only we dinosaurs say it nowadays when there are no students on board, but I always find it rousing! 🤓

 

Blue skies!

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Charlo-VR said:

 

Yep, I jump at Perris a couple weekend days a month - this Saturday we're having our annual Rumble Rules 10-way competition - my favorite type of skydiving, no contact diving and hard docking!  I loved the few times I did CRW, and it's less-common at Perris and Elsinore than it used to be, so I haven't done it since the late 90s.  Wanna get back into it, though.

 

Of the folk you listed I only met Bill Dause (but who hasn't?). I never knew Bill Jones personally, but knew his son Jeff, who I think now manages the DZ at Taft. I drove out to Perris the night Papa Victor crashed in '93, just to be together with friends (I knew a couple of the jumpers who died). By the way, six of the 22 on board survived, and one of them is even leading my 10-way team this Saturday - but he went through a helluva recovery before he roared back and won some 4-way world championships. 

 

You do have some great stories! "Blue skies, Black Death!" is still one of my favorite cheers, but has become rarely heard with the focus on safety these last 20 years - only we dinosaurs say it nowadays when there are no students on board, but I always find it rousing! 🤓

 

Blue skies!

 

Far packin' out, brah!  :biggrin:

 

Jason Grainger was a regular Perris jumper and front man for a group called The Funky Jah Punkies.  He became friends with Dan Phipps who was a bass player I started working with back in the 80's.  Now, Dan plays bass with a guitarist named Chayne Cox in a metal group they call Bigfoot's Dick.  I've jammed with them; Chayne's good.

 

Anyway, Jason liked to do that stunt where you come swooping in under your square and slide along the ground horizontally for a ways on landing.  I hear he misjudged a low hook and hit hard; died later from his injuries.  Just a really cool dude; full of life.  Now, gone too soon.  Blue Sky. 

 

The Joneses: I got along okay with Jeff and his sisters; not so much with Marty.  

 

The Joneses bought Perry out and Antioch was changing.  I really wasn't digging flying for Bill because he was allowing his jumpers to do things that put me in jeopardy as pilot in command.  He also didn't have the people to maintain the planes like Perry did, either.  Then, one St' Patrick's Day evening, Marty got in my face at the DZ bar and I split his forehead with a beer bottle.  Geno Ballard and some of the other jumpers got us to take it outside and it got cooled down.  Bill said I could come back and fly the next day if I wanted to but I told him the way he was running things was "an accident waiting to happen."  That was the last time I flew for Indiana Jones.  :cool:  

 

Jeff's running Taft now?  40 years ago my girlfriend and I jumped there once with Gary Snoddy and a couple others.  And I briefly met Spike Yarter.  Damn shame what happened with his Beech.

 

I am SO happy to be wrong about the statistics for that cartwheel on takeoff at Perris.  Happy to hear somebody made it.  Thank God.  That was such a bummer. 
 

About BLUE SKY/BLACK DEATH: We used to skydive hard but party harder.  About 20 of us would go to a restaurant and sometimes do Dead Ant Drills; got thrown out more than once  Like Steve Martin  and Dan Akroyd at the time: we were wild and crazy guys.

 

When I got my CFI ticket and started flying for Perry Stevens, he had a Cessna 152 he wanted to use for flight instruction; so I set up a primary flight instruction department at the Antioch DZ.  

 

I'd done my 141 training at Navajo Aviation in Concord.  It was a Piper dealership with new planes and a real nice business setup,  They had a professionally-printed sign there that had a picture of a Piper Traumahawk and said, "Blue Sky Special."  (A beginner's lesson at a reduced price.)

 

Now, I don't know how it happened, but one day we were in the Antioch paraloft talking by the packing tables and Paul Landry showed me that Blue Sky sign and says he "got it" so Perry can use it at the DZ for his flight instruction program.

 

Anyway, we had a very dark sense of humor back then.  We started joking about student pilots meeting their fiery demise at the Antioch Flight Training School.  And about that time there was a Burt Reynolds shark movie out called Blue Water, White Death.  We got to talking about that and someone (Larry Arcadi?) related it to the sign, saying, "Blue Sky; White Death."  Then Paul Landry said, "No, it ought to be Blue Sky; Black Death!"  That got written on the sign with a picture of a shark mouth drawn on the plane in black felt pen.  We all laughed and it caught on.

 

We'd be drinking at the DZ bar on weekends and someone would shout, "BLUE SKY?"

 

And everyone who was in on it would yell, "BLACK DEATH!"

 

It also became a farewell salute when somebody bounced.  

 

Perry hated it.  So did George Morar.  It was just a joke but we weren't looking at it from the standpoint of the dropzone owner who is trying to run a family-friendly operation.  

 

They didn't like the DEATH FROM ABOVE T-shirts we got from Soldier of Fortune Magazine, either.  That's where the whole DFA thing got started; it was a Nam slogan sometimes painted on helicopters.  There was a t-shirt with that and a winged skull printed on it.  A couple jumpers (Jim MacCasland and Phil Santos)  used to read that magazine and that's how I found out about it. 

 

One day, a Highway Patrolman named Brookbush drifted over my burble in freefall and fell on my backpack HARD; damn near knocked me out.  

 

I got to talking it over that night with Jim and Phil.  They nicknamed Brookbush "Ambush."  And because he fell on my back, Phil pointed to the ad for the shirts in SOF and said, "Yep!  Death from Above."  

 

So we bought those shirts and started wearing them on California DZ's in the latter 1970's and early 80's.  It was really a statement about getting freight-trained by inept jumpers; not a quasi-military thing at all.  Some people got it but mostly the DZ owners and "professional skydivers" made a point of publicly discouraging it.  

 

And so later, when I started flying online in the RB3D / WOFF / FMJ days, I took the German spelling of DFA as my callsign; using the antiquated spelling Todt.  I interacted for a short time online with the Green Tails as Todt Von Oben back around late 2004  early 2005.  Then I got injured on the job and was on my back for most of three years so I stopped flying sims for a while.  

 

Interestingly enough, about two years later the movie THE RED BARON came out and they had a guy flying a green-tailed Alby marked TOD VON OBEN.  I believe the people who did the special effects for that movie may have been close observers of (if not directly involved with) the gaming community regarding their CG simulations of WWI aircraft.  The computer science behind those planes supported the film's CG aerial effects.  

 

So it's conceivable they may have seen my callsign online, thought it was cool, and used a variant of it in the movie.  Maybe; maybe not.  I'd like to think so, though.  :cool:

 

Blue Sky!  :good:  

 

 

 

DEATH FROM ABOVE.jpg

 

 

TODT VON OBEN.jpg

 

 

ADDIT:  That was more than 40 years ago.  Nowadays, BLUE SKY has a positive connotation: like all good, or clear sailing, or the future looks bright.  It's a proclamation of optimism and joy.  If you hear someone say "Blue Sky" you might want to double-check yourself before responding.  :cool:  

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s great to read the origins of both of those way-used slogans that I saw and said in the ‘90s! I know just enough German to have understood your forum name but now see the jumping connection. I still find it very entertaining when I see a newer jumper experience their first burble in an RW jump - the look of confusion when someone burbles on top of them is priceless, and on the ground I always explain to them they did nothing wrong. And the look of shock the first time someone suddenly falls onto someone else by drifting over them always cracks me up, too. 😆

 

The acronym “BSBD” is still commonly written in skydiving forums when fatalities are discussed, but that may be mostly by older jumpers. I can tell a couple of my older shirts are mildly frowned upon by the DZ operators, but that’s understandable- the sport has really grown over the years, yet we’ve significantly cut down the number of fatalities, except for from hook turns.

 

I was at Perris a few weeks ago when the jumper who worked on the show “Bob’s Burgers” hook turned in - we all hoped he would survive since he was very fit, but alas, he never regained consciousness and died a few days later. I hate hook turns, never do ‘em. Heck, I’ve broken both ankles, one each 20 years apart, just turf surfing in the grass on straight-in landings. At least the second time I knew I would fully recover and be back jumping six weeks later. 
 

Blue Skies! 🍺

Edited by Charlo-VR
grammar
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/27/2021 at 8:00 AM, Charlo-VR said:

It’s great to read the origins of both of those way-used slogans that I saw and said in the ‘90s! I know just enough German to have understood your forum name but now see the jumping connection. I still find it very entertaining when I see a newer jumper experience their first burble in an RW jump - the look of confusion when someone burbles on top of them is priceless, and on the ground I always explain to them they did nothing wrong. And the look of shock the first time someone suddenly falls onto someone else by drifting over them always cracks me up, too. 😆

 

The acronym “BSBD” is still commonly written in skydiving forums when fatalities are discussed, but that may be mostly by older jumpers. I can tell a couple of my older shirts are mildly frowned upon by the DZ operators, but that’s understandable- the sport has really grown over the years, yet we’ve significantly cut down the number of fatalities, except for from hook turns.

 

I was at Perris a few weeks ago when the jumper who worked on the show “Bob’s Burgers” hook turned in - we all hoped he would survive since he was very fit, but alas, he never regained consciousness and died a few days later. I hate hook turns, never do ‘em. Heck, I’ve broken both ankles, one each 20 years apart, just turf surfing in the grass on straight-in landings. At least the second time I knew I would fully recover and be back jumping six weeks later. 
 

Blue Skies! 🍺

 

Hey brother, really nice chatting with you about this.  Been too long.  "Turf surfing."  That's a new one on me.  I love it!  :good:

 

And I hear ya about hook turns.  I'd have to look in my log books but I think the guy I first saw do one of those was Larry Phillips flying a seven cell Strato Cloud.  

 

We didn't have turf surfing back then; hadn't been invented yet.  I bought Haley's 5-cell Strato Star for $400 (to give the Know Sense team the money to go to the Florida Turkey Meet and show CRW to the World)  and it was a ground-seeking missile.  Just landing it took some learning.  But that's all we did; standups.  Maybe try to flare just right so we could do a one foot tippy-toe landing.  But turf surfing hadn't been invented yet.  This was around 1977 or 78.

 

Anyway, I was in the outdoor packing area next to the manifest desk at Antioch.  The peas were across Lone Tree Way; you  had to walk over a 20-foot tall hummock ridge paralleling the road that situated the peas down in kind of a "bowl."  And the power lines ran right next to that hummock and pretty close.

 

So here comes Larry Phillips under his Cloud, but he doesn't try to make the peas.  He does a low hook and does a clean stand-up right on top of that hummock where we could all see how great he was.  We flashed.  Thought he was gonna hammer but he made it.

 

Now, Perry Stevens is the kind of man who doesn't raise his voice when he gets really angry.  He gets very quiet.  He took Larry aside and spoke to him in almost a whisper, but we all heard it.  Perry said he didn't want to see anyone do that at Antioch ever again; and as long as I was there, I never saw another person try it.

 

But, the sport progressed and turf-surfing was born.  I get it.  All good.  I'd have to try it myself.  Is it safe?  No.  Like Norton used to say, "Take out the V and it's sky die."  We all know the risks.  We do it because we love the rush.  That's what it takes to be a skydiver.  

 

---------------

 

Heh!  Broke both of 'em, eh?  Welcome to the Broken Bone Club, brother!  :salute:

 

There was no tandem jumping back then, either.  I made my first jumps in the Marines and, when I was doing my civilian static line and hop-n-pop jumps, I would stand up my T-10 by lifting my butt out of the saddle via the back risers so I could get my feet under me; like swinging on a rope and landing on your feet.  Then, one day I came down in a wind-burble at the bottom of the Sugar Loaf hill and hammered.  Dislocated my left ankle and broke two bones in my right foot.  That was 1976 I think; when the newspaper headlines were choked with pics from that space probe showing Mars as a place strewn with rocks.  I broke the bones in my right foot on a sharp rock so I dubbed that area at the bottom of the Sugarloaf "Mars."

 

Stories?  I got a million of 'em.  Unfortunately, the best ones I can't publish out of respect for the people involved.  :cool:

 

Blue Sky!  :biggrin:

 

Oh, about the KNOW SENSE team?  Here's how CRW got started in California:

 

As kids, we had U-control gas engine planes flying on the end of two long strings.  We'd tape a ribbon on the elevator, stand back to back, and try to chop the other guy's ribbon in what was called "combat" flying back in the 50's.

 

Well, Norton was a bona-fide patched member of the San Diego and Oakland Hells Angels Motorcycle Club.  (He brought Sonny Barger to Antioch and Sonny made two static-line jumps on a T-10 belly-wart rig and made it to the peas both times.  Norton went on to become a jump pilot flying the DC3 for Bill Dause and was one of the best natural pilots I ever saw just because he had the guts to try chancy stuff and the skill to make 'em work.)   And he liked to say, "I love scaring the shit out of myself."

 

So one day, Norton and Haley are at Pope Valley Skyranch playing "Combat Relative Work" where they'd try to fly in, snag the other guy's trailing pilot chute, pull up on it, and collapse his chute; just to scare the shit out of each other.  It usually opened up again after they let go.  They did it for kicks.  But Bill saw them doing it and said, "You guys have no sense."

 

And not long after that, we were in the Antioch Paraloft and Steve Haley drew the design for the first CRW 4-way patch that became used by the USPA on the canvas cover to one of Perry's packing tables.  And, as a jab at Bill, he named the team KNOW SENSE because, as he said, "That's right.  You have to know and sense what the other guy is doing to fly CRW."

 

They made the first 8-Stack over Albin Jensen's farm field in Livermore.  Steve became CCR #1 and Norton became CCS #1 in the official USPA rankings.

 

I still have Steve's custom-made, one-of-a-kind rainbow Strato-Star; one of two chutes that started it all.  You can see it in the opening scenes of Carl Boenish's movie SKYDIVE.  Norton flew an orange and black Strato Star because those are Harley colors.  A few years ago, Steve told me he still has Norton's Strat.  That's history, bro!  If there was a parachute section at the Smithsonian; those two parachutes should be there. 

 

Today, I own the suit and chute Steve jumped on the World's first 4-Stack and night 5-stack.  It used to have nylon-tape "arrows" on top pointing to where Norton should grab ahold when hooking his feet into the lines for the stack.  You can see where they were but they came off before I got it.

 

Steve started using Tom Corbett's Strato Cloud after Tom got hurt trying to close late on Norton in that first eight-stack; he hit hard and messed up his back for a while, IIRC.  Anyway, I bought Steve's 5-Cell and he used Tom's 7-Cell to pilot the first 8-stacks and do demos at the Turkey Meet.

 

He told me, "We were in a stack and some dudes went past in freefall yelling "You ASSHOLES!!!"  LOL!

 

The story of the first attempted four-way Diamond CRW formation is another good story; but that'll keep for another day.

 

Blue Sky!  :)

 

Oh, if anyone's interested, here's a link to SKYDIVE by the late great Carl Boenish.  Enjoy!

 

 

PAT STRAT.jpg

 

POSTSCRIPT:  My wife and I cast SKYDIVE to our TV and watched it.  Afterwards was Boenish's earlier film, SKY CAPERS.  This was people learning to fly their bodies and parachutes in the 1960's.  It's awkward and comical but remember: they were inventing the sport as they went along.

 

Afterwards I watched a modern video about skydiving as presented by a dropzone operator.  Very well made production.  I am really amazed at how much more developed and refined skydiving has become over the past 40 to 50 years.  People are doing things we hadn't dreamed of yet.  I was fortunate to witness the beginnings and early development of some of this; and now, I am pleased to say, what it has become absolutely astounds me.

 

Way to go, Human Race.  :salute:

 

 

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
Link to post
Share on other sites

Relating to the HAPTIC topic: wouldn't it be cool if someone made a JetPad / SimShaker that was built into a slim-line pilot's emergency parachute container or the like?  

 

You could put on your parachute, climb into your plane, and it would all be more realistic, maybe?

 

Okay, not ideal for WWI planes; but for anything where you could wear a backpack chute, I think that'd be cool.

 

 

slimpack.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, NO.20_W_M_Thomson said:

You guys are crazy jumping out of a perfectly good plane, I'd be dead right after jumping out. No way I could do it, Even watching someone on top of a sky scraper on a big screen TV gets me all queasy. 

 

I have only done a few static line jumps, from a light aircraft, many years ago. Then, they did not let you jump (as a beginner): you had to climb out holding onto the wing strut with one foot on a small plate under the door and the other trailing in space. Idea was to get to as close to a stable position as possible before you are in free fall. 

 

I can still remember the sadistic grin on the SNCO's face when he turned to me and told me it was my turn. 

 

Would have loved to take it up as a hobby: circumstances made that impossible.

Edited by unreasonable
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

@Todt_Von_Oben those are fantastic stories, definitely worthy of being included in someone's book!  I love those old skydiving films and also loved to watch Mike McGowan and Norman Kent's videos. I still have those on VHS. I think the wildest things we ever did jumping was throw apples at each other to see what would happen (they simply flew away and upwards relative to us) and jump a demo into the homecoming game at the high school where I was teaching at the time. 🪂

 

I also really like that idea of a strap-on jetpad/simshaker that you wear - I'd be interested in that! 

 

@ST_Catchov the closest I had to flying an ultralight was when I owned a Fresh Breeze Monster paramotor mounted on a Trikebuggy. I only put in about a dozen flights before I realized I was a safer skydiver than paramotor pilot.

 

I also used to enjoy flying a water jetpack where you route the thrust of a jetski through a 50' hose so you can fly around over the water.  That was in Newport Beach about five years ago, but those wealthy folk managed to get that business shut down because of the noise - and I kind of don't blame them 😛

 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Charlo-VR said:

the closest I had to flying an ultralight was when I owned a Fresh Breeze Monster paramotor mounted on a Trikebuggy. I only put in about a dozen flights before I realized I was a safer skydiver than paramotor pilot.

 

Nah, they're crazy things. This is what I'm talking about. The B1-RD. Flew it back in the early 80's. Rather like Santos-Dumont's Demoiselle circa 1909 which is why I liked this particular design. Hell of a lotta fun back then. Of course we were pretty much cowboys and regulations were pretty slack but we were young and death wasn't an option.

 

 

b1rd.jpg.ac1f7d18bb76966c773599245eb44a3d.jpg

  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ya like's the stories, eh?  Okay, here's one of my favorites.

 

Back when people started making BASE jumps (from Bridges, Antennae, Spans, or Earth) TV's Wild World of Sports did a show about jumping off El Capitan in Yosemite National Park.  On screen, a guy with black hair (wearing a white jump suit with black and red trim and a black and red pig-rig) looks back at the camera and says, "This is the ultimate!" before turning and running off the edge of the mountain for his Ranger-authorized freefall.  That guy was Dave Correia.

 

Now, there was a tradition among skydivers that, upon completing your 1,000th jump, your friends would hit you in the face with a pie.  Actually, it wasn't a pie; that would be too expensive.  What we used was a tin pie plate filled with whipped cream.  WHAP!  Right in the mug!  Congratulations, buddy!  :yahoo:

 

Still with me? Okay, so we're at the Antioch DZ and Dave makes his 1,000 dive.  He lands in the peas and is expecting to get pied.  But everybody just went about their business; ignoring him.

 

Dave was walking around all day expecting to get pied; but it didn't happen.  The sun fell, the kegs got tapped, and we began cooking chickens on 55-gallon drum barbecue pits.  (The DZ always had a huge beer-bust and barbecue every Saturday night for the students who trained that day and would jump tomorrow.)  By now, Dave is quietly sitting off by himself; moping over a beer with a hangdog look on his face; thinking he's been forgotten by those he considered his best friends.

 

So I'm standing inside by the fireplace drinking a beer, and Gene Ballard walks up to me and says, "Come on, we're gonna get someone."

 

I didn't know it had been Dave's 1,000th leap and had no idea what good ol' Geno was talking about; but occasionally we had to bounce rowdies and you always back up a bro, right?  So I said, "I'm with you" and  followed him.

 

Gene, myself, and others (I think Norm Ross, Larry Arcadi, and Paul Landry were a party to this but can't swear to it because I was half-assed drunk) walked over to Dave (still looking dejected), took ahold of him, picked him up physically and carried him through the crowd, out the door on our shoulders like a log.  We gently placed Dave laying face-up on that green picnic table that was near the phone booth; where Linda Ballard, Debbie Willet, and others of skydiving's finest ladies stripped Dave buck-naked, smeared his body with whipped cream, and licked it off.

 

I was as surprised as he was.  I don't think he was feeling dejected after that, though.  :biggrin:

 

xxxxxxxxx

 

THOMPSON: We used to get that question a lot.  The reply was always, "What makes you think these planes are perfectly good?"  :cool:

I had five in-flight emergencies as a jump pilot; including an engine failure at 12-5 and a gliding descent to an emergency landing at Antioch 012 airport.  Jumpers beat the crap out of jump planes.  Seldom did we have anything that was "perfectly good."  :biggrin:

 

There's another story there: "The Illegal Planes I've Flown."  LOL!

 

ALL: I only tried to taxi a weight-shift Rogallo-wing ultralight once; accidentally drove it into a storm drain.  That was enough to convince me I shouldn't try to fly it.  (Got another great story about one guy who did, too.  Later...)

 

I always though Dumont's Demoiselle was an enlightened design for an ultra-light and I'm not surprised it got applied to the very successful B1RD.  I'd like to fly one of those, myself.

 

Anyhoo, good chattin' witcha.  Thanks for your info.  Good stuff!   

 

BLUE SKY!  :biggrin:

 

PS: I'm not faulting CHARLO but I gotta agree with CATCHOV: those paramotor things are death rigs.  I wouldn't fly one of those if it was a gift.  Hard landing + you're the landing gear + the engine is strapped to your back =  you do the math.  Sport Le Mort.  :cool:

 

 

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Todt_Von_Oben said:

ALL: I only tried to taxi a weight-shift Rogallo-wing ultralight once; accidentally drove it into a storm drain.  That was enough to convince me I shouldn't try to fly it.  (Got another great story about one guy who did, too.  Later...)

 

I always though Dumont's Demoiselle was an enlightened design for an ultra-light and I'm not surprised it got applied to the very successful B1RD.  I'd like to fly one of those, myself.

 

Well, if we're all in the mood for telling stories I had to LOL over yours TVO! It's such a coincidence. We had a young journalist (who, with the rest of us, had done the very basic flight theory) and he wanted a "scoop" and to see what this ultralight lark was all about! So he comes to our airfield see, all cocky and cameras.  

 

This was the first flight for all of us so we were practicing taxiing to get the feel of things and taking short hops. No brakes, taildragger so you had to gun the motor, stick back and hard rudder to swing her around to stop. Anyway, this guy couldn't seem to get the hang of a) no brakes and b) sitting back at an angle and c) your arse inches off the ground. And gosh, you steer with your feet! 

 

So we've all had a bit of fun and then it's his turn. There was no radio comms and it's a one-seater so you're told what to do, check everything works and off you go on your lonesome. Remember, it's just a taxi mate. Just to get the feel.

 

So off he goes. He was looking a little pale as he pushed the throttle forward. Not a confident look at all. More like terrified. So he shoots forward, lifts the tail (stick back we yell) but he's oblivious to everything. He panics, the tail comes down at last, but he's swerving all over the place like a madman overcorrecting all the time. It's not looking good and he seems to have forgotten there are no brakes or he thinks the rudder pedals are the brakes. So there he is disappearing down the airfield zig-zagging with pathetic yelps of horror having apparently lost all sense of co-ordination.

 

Finally in desperation, he heads (I'm sure unintentionally) toward a ditch-like drain on the side of the grass airfield and ploughs into it coming to a stop with the sound of torn fabric, ripped wires, buckled wheels, over-revving engine and humiliation.

 

Needless to say, the aircraft was not in good shape although the "pilot" was uninjured but in a deep state of shock. Probably he'd never be the same again.

 

Unsurprisingly, further instruction was cancelled for the day much to our disappointment and regret. And we never heard from him again nor read any scoops. Compensation for the repairs was however forthcoming.

 

True story.

 

            ====================================================================================================================

 

You should have another go at it TVO. :biggrin:

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, ST_Catchov said:

 

Well, if we're all in the mood for telling stories I had to LOL over yours TVO! It's such a coincidence. We had a young journalist (who, with the rest of us, had done the very basic flight theory) and he wanted a "scoop" and to see what this ultralight lark was all about! So he comes to our airfield see, all cocky and cameras.  

 

This was the first flight for all of us so we were practicing taxiing to get the feel of things and taking short hops. No brakes, taildragger so you had to gun the motor, stick back and hard rudder to swing her around to stop. Anyway, this guy couldn't seem to get the hang of a) no brakes and b) sitting back at an angle and c) your arse inches off the ground. And gosh, you steer with your feet! 

 

So we've all had a bit of fun and then it's his turn. There was no radio comms and it's a one-seater so you're told what to do, check everything works and off you go on your lonesome. Remember, it's just a taxi mate. Just to get the feel.

 

So off he goes. He was looking a little pale as he pushed the throttle forward. Not a confident look at all. More like terrified. So he shoots forward, lifts the tail (stick back we yell) but he's oblivious to everything. He panics, the tail comes down at last, but he's swerving all over the place like a madman overcorrecting all the time. It's not looking good and he seems to have forgotten there are no brakes or he thinks the rudder pedals are the brakes. So there he is disappearing down the airfield zig-zagging with pathetic yelps of horror having apparently lost all sense of co-ordination.

 

Finally in desperation, he heads (I'm sure unintentionally) toward a ditch-like drain on the side of the grass airfield and ploughs into it coming to a stop with the sound of torn fabric, ripped wires, buckled wheels, over-revving engine and humiliation.

 

Needless to say, the aircraft was not in good shape although the "pilot" was uninjured but in a deep state of shock. Probably he'd never be the same again.

 

Unsurprisingly, further instruction was cancelled for the day much to our disappointment and regret. And we never heard from him again nor read any scoops. Compensation for the repairs was however forthcoming.

 

True story.

 

            ====================================================================================================================

 

You should have another go at it TVO. :biggrin:

 

Thanks for sharing, STC; funny story!  When you said he looked "terrified" I knew this was not going to end well.  :biggrin:

 

The one I tried was a trike frame with a Rogallo wing on top that you swung around with one of those triangle-shaped yokes.  Weight shift, basically.  No brakes other than dragging your feet.  It belonged to my employer, Perry Stevens, and he asked if I'd like to fly it.  I couldn't even taxi the damn thing on uneven ground.  It didn't have a stick and rudder so I didn't like it.

 

But another guy was there; an old pilot friend of Perry.  He owned a Maule that Perry occasionally hired and I'd jumped out of before.  Climbed okay but was hard to get in and out of with a rig on.  

 

Anyway, he gave it a go.  Taxied onto 27, gunned it, rolled forward a short distance, and then pitched straight up into the air; whereupon it stalled, rolled sideways and fell.  He landed hard on his side and the kite was demolished.  He jumped up out of the wreck with eyes as big as saucers.  Never said a word.  Went to his car and drove to the small hospital nearby on Lone Tree Way (they hated us for constantly bringing them broken ankles in the round-chute / static line days) to get himself looked at, from what I heard.  I never saw him again.  

 

Later on, the Quicksilver company opened a loft at Antioch and we had ultralights in the air all the time.  They threw a big sales party one weekend and a bunch of the local cowboys flew in with 10 Quicksilver replicas they'd made themselves.  The detail (hardware) was even better than the manufacturer.  He told them guys to get the hell out of there but they stayed for the party.  

 

I'd like to have something to fly again; an ultra light, sport, or a small taildragger would be fine.  But Hawaii weather is too capricious for a VFR plane; and if the rubber band breaks, you're usually in the ocean or a mountainous jungle.  Maybe if I go back to the mainland.  But for now, I'm content flying sims.  Want to take a ride in the Stearman they have over on Oahu one day.  I fly that out of Dilingham in Prepar3D VR.  Can't wait to do it for real.  

 

"Skydivers have more fun than people" and "Flyin' is funner" as they say.  :good:

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

BACK TO SIMS:

 

While waiting for my PUMA helicopter simulator to be built and delivered, I did what someone on Youtube recommended: used my CH stick and pedals to fly a Robinson R22 in PREPAR3D virtual reality.  Not good.  

 

The anti-torque pedal pressures are way too light and not as one-sided as a real helicopter.  

 

Cyclic ain't bad but all the collective has is power; no blade pitch function.  

 

It sort of works after a fashion but it's so far from reality it seems sure to build bad habits.  I tried it twice in a Robinson and once in a Blackhawk; that was enough.  Flying sims that way is a potentially deleterious waste of time.

 

The flight simulator controls i have coming are rated by pilots as being pretty good right out of the box; but there's a freeware program you can download that tightens everything up.  

 

Professional pilots say good things like (words to the effect) "It was sloppy before but now it's very much like the real thing."

 

Cam't wait.  I've never piloted a rotorcraft but I have been in some, studied how they operate, and did pretty well with that R22 simulation.  I think I can fly the PUMA right out of the box.  

 

I believe I can teach myself to fly an R22 in Virtual Reality; then, book an hour with a local CFI for some supervised hands-on and I believe I'll be able to not only fly it, but fly it well.

 

We'll see....

Puma_Back_1024x1024.jpg

ADDIT: Hamby Aviation on Youtube added motorcycle steering dampers to the collective arm and pedal linkage to achieve a smoother representation of control system pressures than can be achieved with the PUMA's "lock-nut friction adjusters" alone.  This is a mod the user can do himself.  I'll shop around online for a few days to get a good deal and equip me sim pod with something like this:

 

 

DAMPER.jpg

 

I mention this here in hopes that these technologies might also help someone trying to build a WWI sim pod; like the Rockenbacker we were talking about earlier.

 

Prosit!

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
Link to post
Share on other sites

@ST_Catchovand @Todt_Von_Oben, such great stories, well told!  I didn't tell any one when I made my 1,000th jump so I wouldn't get pied. 

 

Speaking of paramotoring, I used to fly my Moster paramotor from dry lake beds or open fields away from unrestricted airspace, but one time I was flying from the ultralight park just south of the Perris dropzone.

 

While just 50 feet from touching down I realized I was about to run over  an orange, rubbery traffic cone someone had left near the landing area. I hadn't carefully scouted the entire landing area well enough because I was used to spare, flat, abandoned spaces. I should have gone around for a different line-up away from that cone, but the winds had gotten squirrely during my flight so I was eager to get back on the ground.

 

Anyhow, I didn't have any brakes, of course, and I figured the rear cross bar beneath the seat of my Trikebuggy would simply knock over the rubbery cone.

 

Much to my shock, just as the cone squeaked by my  left foot pedal I came to an instant stop with a clang, and my Icarus paraglider wing swung forward into the ground in front of me. Stunned, I shut off my engine and also realized I may have just sprained my ankle. Why?

 

Because that orange cone was there to warn folk of a short metal post that I later learned was set deep into concrete for paraglider pilots to tether their ultralights as they ran up their engines. Why didn't that occur to me?! 😖

 

I was flying alone that day and limped around as I packed up my gear and mounted the undamaged Trikebuggy onto my trailer. I was more concerned my wife would be furious I had sprained my ankle just six days before our scuba trip to Cuba. I didn't actually sprain it, I don't think, but I did limp around that liveaboard dive boat the following week!

 

Back on topic, my own rudder pedals are Slaw Device to which I added one of those motorcycle steering dampeners. I love the engineering in these pedals, though don't know if they improve my sim flying - but they sure add to the immersion of simming in VR with a Buttkicker :salute:

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

CHARLO: Great story!  Thanks for sharing.  

 

The paramotors I've seen had no wheels or undercarriage.  Sounds like you had a trike with wheels under you.  Smart.  Would have been a different story if what caught that stake was your leg.  (ow!)

 

RUDDER PEDALS: Yep!  Those are the dampers.  You flying the Viper pedals?  How do you like the slaw device?  

 

ADDIT:  If you guys are interested in crazy things that happen in skydiving today, go to Youtube and search FRIDAY FREAKOUT.  They publish a new short video every week and some of it is pretty gnarly.  Really gives a good look at the new techniques and gear being used today.  Can't believe how trim pig-rigs are.  NICE!!!  :good:

 

Here's one picked at random; I haven't even seen it yet myself.  If you cast these to a television and just let it run, they go on forever. 

 

BLUE SKY!  :biggrin:

 

 

 

Edited by Todt_Von_Oben
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...