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QUIZ: what plane is this?


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AndyJWest

Unusually for a jet, the forward fuselage was built from moulded plywood. If it was good enough for the Mosquito, why not?

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HagarTheHorrible
On 11/15/2020 at 5:13 PM, AndyJWest said:

Unusually for a jet, the forward fuselage was built from moulded plywood. If it was good enough for the Mosquito, why not?


i don’t think it was that unusual.  I know that the front of the Jet Provost/Strikemaster was ply and I wouldn’t be at all surprised if other British jets from this era also employed similar construction ( Hunter ?).  I admit though, it does all seem a bit low tech, when we might consider “jets” as the cutting edge of technology.

 

Anyway, isn’t the picture of a Venom, rather than a Vamp ?

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41 minutes ago, raaaid said:

why the vampire name?

Cos it sounds better than "Spider Crab". 

 

I suspect it wouldnt pass modern emission testing....

 

 

 

 

smokey vamp.jpg

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3 hours ago, HagarTheHorrible said:

Anyway, isn’t the picture of a Venom, rather than a Vamp ?

 

I believe XG775 was a Sea Vampire T22. The picture I think dates from about 1967.  It was sold in 1970 to Southall Technical College and eventually partially scrapped. The Fuselage was saved by a Norfolk Collector in the 70s and it now apparently lives in Wales having been bought in Jun 2020. 

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17 minutes ago, raaaid said:

i dont picture the russians naming a plane vampire, i think its odd i wonder about this ussue some days ago

 

I think that Russians don't generally give their aircraft any official names, with some exceptions, but just designations with letters and numbers. Nicknames are a different matter.

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3 minutes ago, raaaid said:

i dont picture the russians naming a plane vampire, i think its odd i wonder about this ussue some days ago

well they had the mosquito so its not a huge leap of imagination for whoever to find a bigger faster blood sucker to name it after. There was also a AEG Vampyr Vacuum cleaner around during this time dating from the 1920s. Again not a great leap of imagination to name one machine partially based on sucking in air with another (especially given its sinister name) and finally we have minds focused on the occult given the aircraft used a "Goblin" Engine. The vacuum cleaner connection I think was a standing joke given the engines relatively low static power - the joke being that the vaccum cleaner was more powerful.

 

As the the Russians, the Kamov KA50 was unoffically called "Werewolf"

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19//Moach

Most of the "names" associated with Russian aircraft are really just the NATO designations given them during the cold war. "Bear", "Badger" and others starting with B were all bombers; Fighters, like "Fulcrum" and "Foxbat" were likewise named with F. All their helicopters were similarly named "Hind", "Havoc", "Halo" and so on.

 

But those were never really their real names, had they ever had any.  Usually the Russians stuck to the tradition of naming their hardware after the initials for the bureau that designed them and a number, like "MiG-21" for "Mikoyan/Gurevich" (odd numbers indicate fighter types while even numbers are bombers) - If any names were given to their aircraft by their own side, I'd think they were mostly nicknames that stuck and not some official designation.

 

 

For the OP:  Yeah, that's a DeHavilland Vampire.

 

AFAIK, it used that same engine (was it the RR Avon?) which the brits very kindly then sold the designs for to the Soviets, effectively kickstarting their jet development and the next 50 years of one-upsmanship that followed...  Many people weren't very happy about this shortly thereafter.

 

As you can see on that other pic above, there was a known quirk with the cartridge starters used on those early jets, where they'd belch out a thick blob of black smoke when fired.  Alarmingly enough, this was considered "perfectly normal" - Though it had the Americans running for fire extinguishers when they first adopted the Camberra type bombers which also bore this unique feature.

 

 

As for the Vampire, I'm not sure why they called it that. Perhaps they just thought it sounded cool. 

I don't think it has anything to do with the later run of V-named bombers. (or does it?)

 

The US Navy had curious passing fad for naming their aircraft after something sounding occult-ish. Hence planes like the "Banshee",  "Demon" and the well known "Phantom" - But they seem to always revert to their usual preference for naming things after predatory wildlife.

 

On a loose aside, the F-22 "Raptor" was the first even USAF type to not have been named after an All-American bird of prey ever since they made it a tradition to do so.  This was due to it having been announced in the early '90s, when a certain Steven Spielberg had suddenly made dinosaurs a very trendy subject. - True story - They figured this would be good PR , as if something as awesome as an F22 ever needed that...

 

 

Still, the RAF always had the practice of giving their aircraft actual names. 

(with an unwholesome bias for things related to unflyable weather conditions "Hurricane", "Tempest", "Typhoon" - I mean, what the hell?) 

 

To loosely quote the designer of the Spitfire, on learning of the name they had assigned it:  "Of course, they had to name it something silly..."

 

 

 

 

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24 minutes ago, 19//Moach said:

AFAIK, it used that same engine (was it the RR Avon?) which the brits very kindly then sold the designs for to the Soviets, effectively kickstarting their jet development and the next 50 years of one-upsmanship that followed...  Many people weren't very happy about this shortly thereafter.

 

The Vampire used the DH Goblin. The Mig15s engine was an uprated and unlicenced copy of the 55 or so RR Nene engines which the British kindly supplied the Russians on the promise they wouldn't be used militarily. Somewhere in there is also a story about an early Russian delegation's shoes being adapted with extra soft soles. These would collect metal shavings left on the floor of the RR factory for later analysis and i believed were used to solve a problem with pre nene russian jet fan or compressor failures. 

 

For a country long noted for its cynicism we can be delightfully naive at times! 

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19//Moach
Just now, BOO said:

The Vampire used the DH Goblin. The Mig15s engine was an uprated and unlicenced copy of the 55 or so RR Nene engines which the British kindly supplied the Russians on the promise they wouldn't be used militarily. Somewhere in there is also a story about an early Russian delegation's shoes being adapted with extra soft soles. These would collect metal shavings left on the floor of the RR factory for later analysis and i believed were used to solve a problem with pre nene russian jet fan or compressor failures. 

 

For a country long noted for its cynicism we can be delightfully naive at times! 

 

Ah yes, that's how that episode happened.  Thanks for clearing up my muddled recollections! 

 

Who can ever say history doesn't have its "LOL" moments?

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3 minutes ago, 19//Moach said:

 

Ah yes, that's how that episode happened.  Thanks for clearing up my muddled recollections! 

 

Who can ever say history doesn't have its "LOL" moments?

I suspect there was very little "LOL-ing" going on in either RR or the British Minstry of WTF did we just do.  

 

BTW wasnt the spit originally designated "SHREW" - a name to truly inspire fear... "Achtung....er... Shrew?". I think the story goes that someones daughter (possibly RJ Mitchell's) was known as something of a Spitfire (a shakesperian reference for a pretty pissed off fiery and vengeful female) and thus the myth and legend was born. 

 

 

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cardboard_killer
1 hour ago, BOO said:

well they had the mosquito so its not a huge leap of imagination for whoever to find a bigger faster blood sucker to name it after.

 

"The Margaret Thatcher" was already taken? :)

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AndyJWest

The British have always chosen perfectly sensible names for their aircraft. What could possibly be more awe-inspiring for an enemy navy than to be informed that a herd of fearsome Vildebeest were approaching, carrying torpedoes!

800px-Vickers_Vildebeest_ExCC.jpg

 

 

 

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Monksilver
2 hours ago, AndyJWest said:

The British have always chosen perfectly sensible names for their aircraft. What could possibly be more awe-inspiring for an enemy navy than to be informed that a herd of fearsome Vildebeest were approaching, carrying torpedoes!

 

 

How about a flock of Sopwith Cuckoo torpedo bombers?

 

cuckoo.PNG.4ea56d302e6d1853c7e50aa7cbf96b09.PNG

 

 

 

But if you want to find a plane that has a silly name that just isn't suitable for a torpedo bomber and is ugly to boot then there is one company you can trust to come up trumps, I give you the good old Blackburn Kangaroo torpedo bomber

 

 

 

kangaroo.PNG.89206d2cb57583f81f760fb94a1ff309.PNG

 

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MiloMorai
On 11/18/2020 at 8:08 AM, BOO said:

I suspect there was very little "LOL-ing" going on in either RR or the British Minstry of WTF did we just do.  

 

BTW wasnt the spit originally designated "SHREW" - a name to truly inspire fear... "Achtung....er... Shrew?". I think the story goes that someones daughter (possibly RJ Mitchell's) was known as something of a Spitfire (a shakesperian reference for a pretty pissed off fiery and vengeful female) and thus the myth and legend was born. 

 

 

Imagine if one was shot down by a Shrew.🤣

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Feathered_IV
On 11/19/2020 at 3:53 AM, AndyJWest said:

The British have always chosen perfectly sensible names for their aircraft. What could possibly be more awe-inspiring for an enemy navy than to be informed that a herd of fearsome Vildebeest were approaching, carrying torpedoes!

 


I always wondered that about the Americans and their Wild Weasels. Not very scary.   “Ooh look out!  It’s the Wild Weasels!!” It hardly seems like a name to inspire shock and awe in their enemies.  Unless of course they are on the lavatory at the time.  

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Gambit21
13 hours ago, Feathered_IV said:


I always wondered that about the Americans and their Wild Weasels. Not very scary.   “Ooh look out!  It’s the Wild Weasels!!” It hardly seems like a name to inspire shock and awe in their enemies.  Unless of course they are on the lavatory at the time.  

 

Clearly someone who’s never witnessed a weasel attack - or who knows anything about weasels. They’re are pound for pound one of the most fearsome predators out there. Our Long Tailed Weasel up around these parts can take out an animal 4x it’s size. 

 

 

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DD_fruitbat

The British never went for a weasel as far as I know, but there was a Fairy Ferret. Nasty little bugger. Wisely never ordered.

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AndyJWest
26 minutes ago, DD_fruitbat said:

The British never went for a weasel as far as I know, but there was a Fairy Ferret. Nasty little bugger. Wisely never ordered.

 

Looks benign enough. What was wrong with it?

800px-FFerretI.jpg

 

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DD_fruitbat

I was kind of joking with the ferret reference (they are nasty little buggers), lol, don't know why it was never ordered it, just 3 made mid 1920's iirc.

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