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Aircraft of Czechoslovak pilots - all 4K

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Spitfire Mk.Vb from 312. (Czechoslovak) Squadron RAF

312sqn.md.jpg


Kučera_312SQN_BL381_2_42


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Spitfire Mk.Vb BL381 DUoL
On this aircraft, P / O Otmar Kučera recorded the first victory on 16 February 1942 after rearmament of the 312th Squadron on a Spitfire Mk.Vb when he shot down a Ju 88A.


W3249_312SQN_12_41

 

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Spitfire MK.Vb W3249 DUoK
One of the first taken over Spitfires Mk.Vb with camouflage, which occurs for a short time in Spitfires that have undergone a medium overhaul in 9.MU.


Peřina_312SQN_AD572_3_42

 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb AD572 DUoC
The aircraft on which F / O František Peřina often flew, on this aircraft Peřina shot down on June 3, 1942 one Fw 190A from III / JG2 for sure and the other from the same unit damaged.

http://www.mediafire.com/file/3u0ngx0v2fqb96f/312_SQN_SpitfireMkVb.rar

If you do not see the skin, you need to rename:

Kučera_312SQN_BL381_2_42 to Kucera_312SQN_BL381_2_42
Peřina_312SQN_AD572_3_42 to Perina_312SQN_AD572_3_42

I apologize for the inconvenience!


 

Quote

For all my skins:

In my opinion, the skins I have created are sources from literature, photographs and other materials. Please let me know if you can prove photographically that I have something wrong with an already published skin. I will be happy to repair the skin according to the photo you published. Some of the skins are an expression of my opinion on the black and white photo of the aircraft.

 

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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Spitfire Mk.Vb from 310. (Czechoslovak) Squadron RAF


310sqn.jpg


Foit_310SQN_BL591_6_42

 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb BL591 NNoM
The aircraft on which the commander of Squadron B 312nd Squadron F / Lt Emil Foit flew during the spring and summer of 1942. The aircraft is captured during the period of change of insignia in mid-June 1942.

 

 

Kimlicka_310SQN_EP464_19_8_42

 

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Spitire Mk.Vb EP464 NNoE
Spitfire EP464 on which F / Lt Bohumil Kimlička during Operation Jubilee on August 19, 1942 damaged one Dornier Do217 over the port of Dieppe.

 

 

EP637_310SQN_7_42

 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb EP637 NNoK
The aircraft participating in Operation Rutter, a large army exercise in July 1942. The same distinctive designation was then used during operations related to the landing in Dieppe.

 

310. SQN RAF - Spitfire Mk.Vb

 

5 hours ago, ATA_Ringlett said:

I found bugs in a pair of skins.
You can download the repaired files here:

 

Kimlička Mk.Vb
 

 

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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Spitfire Mk.Vb from 65. Squadron RAF

65SQN.jpg
 
AR384_65SQN_5_42
 
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Spitfire Mk.Vb AR384 YToL
Sgt Vladimír Kopeček made an emergency landing aircraft in May 1942 during his service with the 65th Squadron of the RAF

Kopecek_65SQN_BL292_spring_42
 
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Spitfire Mk.Vb BL292 YToK
Sgt Vladimír Kopeček also has recorded flights on this aircraft, the aircraft is in non-standard camouflage with a very light gray color on the upper surfaces.

Loucky_65SQN_AB133_spring_42

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Spitfire Mk.Vb AB133 YToE
Personal machine of Sgt František Loucký, author of the book "Many did not arrive" (Mnozí nedoletěli), during his service with the 65th Squadron of the RAF. AB133 is shown in a form with many camouflage fixes and the inscription Lucky at a time when his service with the squadron was coming to an end.

Spitfire Mk.Vb from 65.SQN RAF

 

 

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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Karel Pošta
 
Posta.jpg
 
Karel Posta was one of the most respected Czechoslovak fighters. He was especially famous for his brilliantly daring acrobatics on the Spitfire, arousing enthusiasm in the British themselves. "I didn't even know that there was so much to be done with the Spitfire, after one of his amazing exhibitions, one of the oncoming RAF officers was heard. And it was definitely not an isolated voice.
He was born on September 29, 1914 in Pilsen in the poor family of a local Škoda worker. At the three-year vocational school, he trained as a mechanic, which was a relatively good training for flying, which enchanted him as a child. He started flying before the war. Together with Václav Šlouf, Stanislav Peroutka and other pilots who were to become so famous during the war, he began attending the West Bohemian Aeroclub at Plzeň-Bory Airport. Then it was only logical that he enrolled in the School for Professional Air Force in Prostějov, which he underwent in the years 1933-1935. He obtained the qualification of a pilot here and after joining the war he became a member of the 34th Fighter Squadron. It was part of the T. G. Masaryk Air Regiment, based first in Prague-Kbely and then in Hradec Králové. During the mobilization, when Capt. Adolf Chrněla, was located at the airports of Brno, Měnín, Ňaršany and Košice. The Post Office honed its indisputable pilot talent on Avia B-534 biplanes, the standard armament of fighter units of the then Czechoslovakia. air force.
 
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The long-serving sergeant Karel Pošta fled to neighboring Poland on May 12, 1939, but more precise information is missing from which places and under what circumstances he left the occupied homeland. It was said, however, that he got disguised as a passionate entomologist. It is said that he drove the butterfly behind the butterfly for so long that he found himself in neighboring Poland. Apparently, however, he had to be held for some time in one of the Polish police prisons, as he did not present himself at the consulate in Krakow until June 25, 1939. He then sailed from Poland to France, where he retrained at the air base in Chartres after the war broke out. He was one of those who still managed to fight on the Western Front. On May 15, 1940, he was assigned to the front of the 4th Squadron Groupe de Chasse II / 4, operating with the relatively popular Curtiss H-75. During the hard retreat, he proved not only his excellent piloting, but also his shooting skills. He only had to fly a total of 30.15 operating hours at the time and scored his first two victories. In both cases, the shares were shot down, in the first it was a two-engine He-111, in the second the observation Hs-126. For his performances he received the French Croix de Guerre with two silver stars. This was followed by a departure to North Africa and a cruise to the still defiant Great Britain.
He was accepted into the ranks of the RAF in the rank of Sergeant and on September 19, 1940 he became a member of the 312th Czechoslovak Fighter Squadron, forming with the Hurricanes Mk.I at the base of Duxford. With some breaks, he served with her for almost the rest of the war and became one of its unmissable members. Today, the opinions of the superiors of the time, such as "very noisy, careless about their appearance ..." seem rather funny ... Karel Pošta really paid some attention to some things. On the air side, however, it was always rated with above-average marks. Much could be said about his stunts in the air, mainly because the Post Office was able to move confidently and skillfully on a very thin line between risk and gambling, which led the otherwise established pilots to despair. "All the pilots of the Twenty-Three were older, also much more experienced, and they let me know very often," writes one of them. "Before each takeoff, I was instructed to fly in a formation of five centimeters is the longest distance between the wings! Karel Pošta, with whom I started flying in Pilsen years ago, even claimed that those five centimeters were too far away. He once showed it to me and put one wing on the other. I have to admit that I didn't like such behavior very much, but one always has to pay for the experience in some way.
With the Three Hundred and Twelve, with whom he was promoted to the rank of officer after a year, Karel Pošta completed virtually all war campaigns in which it participated from air defense of the British Isles, countless offensive sweeps over occupied France, landing in Normandy, airborne operations in the Netherlands and long-distance escorts of bombers over Germany.
 
Spitfire Mk.Vb
 
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BL282 from the state of the 312th Czechoslovak Squadron RAF in the form of June 1942 when Karel Pošta damaged two Fw 190s on it.

Spitfire IX
 
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MJ533 from the state of the 312th Czechoslovak Squadron in the form of spring 1944.
 
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SL633 in two forms. The first of August 1945 as it looked during the return of Czechoslovak pilots from Great Britain. And in the second from 1946, already relatively old from the state of the 2nd Air Division of the Czechoslovak Air Force.

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TE515 in a similar demonstration machine of the Czechoslovak Air Force.
 

Spitfire MK.XVI
 
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SM406 from the state of the 17th Fighter Squadron RAF, Air Day in Farnborough July 7, 1950
 



http://www.mediafire.com/file/t3w8boailizp421/Karel_Posta_Spitfire.rar

I will concentrate all camouflage of Spitfire aircraft of Czechoslovak pilots here.

The plans are:

Aircraft commanders of the Czechoslovak wing
Aircraft 313rd (Czechoslovak) Squadron RAF (Spitfire Mk.Vb)
Aircraft of squadron commanders (both Czechoslovak squadrons and others in which the Czechoslovak pilot served as commander)
Other Spitfire Mk.Vb camouflage, which I find interesting, both from the Czechoslovak squadrons of the RAF, and later from other RAF units.

And when Hurricane comes out, I have an ongoing project called Night Hawk.

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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3 hours ago, ATA_Ringlett said:

The plans are:

Aircraft commanders of the Czechoslovak wing
Aircraft 313rd (Czechoslovak) Squadron RAF
Aircraft of squadron commanders (both Czechoslovak squadrons and others in which the Czechoslovak pilot served as commander)
Other Spitfire camouflage, which I find interesting, both from the Czechoslovak squadrons of the RAF, and later from other RAF units.

And when Hurricane comes out, I have an ongoing project called Night Hawk.

Bring it on.

And thank you for the Spit skins.

 

Have a nice day.

 

:salute:

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Czechoslovakian Wing Commanders


wing.jpg
Vasatko_Exeter_Wing_BM592_6_42

 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb BM592 AV
Alois "Amos" Vašátko the first commander of the Czechoslovak wing from its founding on May 3, 1942 until his death on June 23, 1912, when the Fw 190A-3 piloted by Luftwaffe Unterofficier Wilhelm Reushling from 7 / JG2 collided with his machine.


Mrazek_Exeter_Wing_en765_7_42
 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb EN765 KM
The plane of the second of the commanders of the Exeter wing, Karel Mrázek. This aircraft served only one month at the wing and was then handed over to the 412th Squadron. The aircraft as such was deleted from the state of September 8, 1945 and subsequently scrapped.


Dolezal_Exeter_Wing_EP461_5_43

 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb EP461 FD
The third of the Czechoslovak wing commanders also used the obsolete Spitfire Mk.Vb in 1943, as well as all three Czechoslovak squadrons. Their Spitfires Mk.Vb / Vc were not replaced until January 1944.

 

Vybiral_134Wing_MK463_6_6_44

 

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Spitfire L.F. Mk.IXc MK463 VY
The fourth commander of the Czechoslovak, at that time 134th wing of the 2nd TAF RAF, Tomáš Vybíral with this aircraft led his charges over the invasion beaches in Normandy.

Please use for SpitfireMkIXe


Hlado_BradwellBayWing_LZ920_12_44

 

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Spitfire F. Mk. IXc LZ290 DO
Jaroslav Hlaďo the last of the commanders of the Czechoslovak wing with whom our pilots returned home on August 13, 1945. This aircraft, however, is in the form of the last war Christmas from the state of Bradwell Bay wing, from December 1944.
Please use for SpitfireMkIXe


Czechoslovakian Wing Commanders

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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2 hours ago, Skywarp said:

Nice jobs!!

My contributions:

 

 

I looked, GREAT JOB!
Congratulations

Not one of them intersects with my plans :)

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Czechoslovak Spitfire Mk.Vb - 313. Squadron

313SQN.jpg

 

Truhlar_313SQN_AA865_4_42

 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb AA865 RYoD
Sgt Václav Truhlář's personal plane, which was shot down with this machine on April 10, 1942 and made an emergency landing on the beach near Calais. The wounded pilot traveled to the hospital and then to the prisoner of war camp, the aircraft ended up as a source of spare parts for spitfires used in the Luftwaffe. A photograph of an airplane where the symbol of the "Gobels the tortoise" was not seen was known for a long time, and on the contrary a photograph of Sgt Truhlář next to this symbol. The plane and the turtle were put together thanks to photos that appeared on the E-Bay server a few years ago.

 

truhlar-vaclav-AA865.jpg



Hajek_313SQN_AB276_4_42

 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb AB276 RYoK
F/Lt Václav Hájek's personal plane in the form from April 1942, as well as the other two Spitfires, carries a drawing made by Karel Pavlík. František Vancl also flew on the plane.



Fejfar_313SQN_BL973_4_42

 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb BL973 RYoS
Personal machine of the commander of Flight B 313rd Squadron F / Lt Stanislav Fejfar, an pilot ace with 6 certain victories, which was shot down on this aircraft and killed on 17 May 1942 during a duel with Hauptman Josef Priller III / JG26, who reported him as shot down in flames. Along with his commander, Sgt Miroslav Borkovec also disappeared, who probably fell victim to Lieutenant Aisletner from III / JG26. Stanislav Fejfar's personal diary was published in a book entitled "Deník Stíhače" - The Fighter's Diary.

 

 

Czechoslovak Spitfire Mk.Vb - 313. SQN

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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Czechoslovak Squadron Leaders I

squadron.jpg

Hartman_310SQN_MA301_9_44

 

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Jiří Hartman
Hartman (czech language web)


Slouf_312SQN_MA834_11_44

 

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Václav Šlouf
Šlouf (czech language web)


A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXc aircraft commanders of Czechoslovak squadrons from the autumn of 1944 from the period of escorts of the daily bombing unions over Germany.


Kucera_313SQN_RK889_7_45

 

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Otmar Kučera
Kučera (czach language web)


The aircraft in the form of July 1945, when the 313rd Squadron at the airport in Manston was waiting for release from the RAF and the Soviet permit to return to Czechoslovakia.


Squadron Leaders I

5 hours ago, ATA_Ringlett said:

I found bugs in a pair of skins.
You can download the repaired files here:

 

Hartman Mk.IX

Šlouf Mk.IX
 

 

Quote

I renamed the theme to "Aircraft of Czechoslovak pilots in World War II", because I do not want to start a new theme unnecessarily and there are other types of aircraft that are available in this game. It will probably be the first La-5FN of František Fajtl.

Thanks for understanding.

 

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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Thank you very much for beautiful skins. Just one small remark:  Spitfires, which took part in operation Jubilee did not wear the marking on the nose (Spitfire EP464 and EP637 of 310SQN). Such marking was used only during exercise "Rutter", but was removed for "Jubilee". Othewise your skins are fantastic. Looking forward to next czechoslovak pilots skins.

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20 hours ago, technic said:

Thank you very much for beautiful skins. Just one small remark:  Spitfires, which took part in operation Jubilee did not wear the marking on the nose (Spitfire EP464 and EP637 of 310SQN). Such marking was used only during exercise "Rutter", but was removed for "Jubilee". Othewise your skins are fantastic. Looking forward to next czechoslovak pilots skins.

 

Thank you.
With that coloring it's possible. But all available literary sources claim to me that Rutter and Jubille differed in that during Operation Rutter, the planes involved in it and the lanes on the elevator rudders. And not during Jubille. That's why I stuck to this look.

 

19 hours ago, Voidhunger said:

Thanks for the skins and the info about pilots ATA_Ringlett!

 

Thank you

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František Fajtl


Fajtl.jpg

 

Lieutenant General František Fajtl was a Czechoslovak fighter pilot fighting during World War II in the Royal Air Force and since 1944 in Czechoslovak air units deployed against Nazi Germany in the Slovak National Uprising and the Battle of Ostrava. After the war, he was imprisoned during the communist government. He is the author of many books about our pilots.


František Fajtl - wikipedia, english language



Fajtl_313SQN_AB916_11_41
 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb AB916 RYoF
A machine from the time of František Fajtl's work with Squadron A 313rd Squadron. The aircraft is drawn with one of the possible variants of coloring the propeller cone.


Fajtl_122SQN_BM210_5_42
 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb BM210 MToF
Reconstruction of the appearance of the Spitfire from the time when František Fajtl commanded the 122nd (City of Bombay) Squadron, in which he was shot down on the afternoon of 5 May 1942 over Lille Fw 190A from I / JG26. With the help of the French resistance, he passed through occupied France, Franco's Spain, where he was detained in the Miranda concentration camp, and finally got back to Great Britain via Gibraltar. The attempt for revenge for his alleged death probably led to the loss of Stanislav Fejfar from the 313rd Squadron a few days later. František Fajtl wrote a book "Sestřelen" - "Downed" about his escape across France after the war


Fajtl_1CSSPl_58_september_17_1944
 

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Lavochkin La5FN
The La-5FN fuselage number 58, which was most often flown by František Fajtl, commander of 1. Československý samostatný stíhací pluk (1. Czechoslovak intendepend fighter squadron) during the Slovak National Uprising in September and October 1944 from Zolná and Tri Duby airports. Other pilots flew on the plane during the uprising. Due to unfinished repairs, the aircraft was fired on October 25, 1944 at the Tri duby airport so that it would not fall into the hands of the Germans.

 

Download Frantisek Fajtl skins

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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I found bugs in a pair of skins.
You can download the repaired files here:

 

Kimlička Mk.Vb

 

Hartman Mk.IX

Šlouf Mk.IX
 

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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did not give me and I added for a better idea of the appearance and pictures of individual aircraft

 

2020_10_28__11_47_35.md.png

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Czechoslovak pilots over Ostrava I
 

Ostrava.md.jpg


Husman_Viderspan_3BiLP_4_45


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Il-2m3
Il-2m3 pilot Videršpán, shooter Husman, Ostrava operation April 16, 1945
Richard Husman alias Filip Jánský, author of the book "Nebeští jezdci" "Heavenly Riders", served with the 311th SQN in Great Britain and later with the Czechoslovak Battle Regiment in the USSR. During an operational flight on April 16, 1945, he shot down an attacking Fw 190F on their sturmovik.


Capajevci_3Bilb_4_45


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Il-2m3
Aircraft of the 3rd Battle Air Regiment of the Czechoslovak Composite Air Division in the USSR, April 1945, Ostrava operation. The inscription Chapaevets is to commemorate Soviet soldiers from the October Revolution in Russia.


B31_30BiLP_11_46


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B-31 s.č. 18694113, Listopad 1946
The aircraft of the 30th "Ostrava" Attack  Air Regiment of the Czechoslovak Air Force


Czechoslovak pilots over Ostrava 1945 Part I

Fixed skin for B-31. I accidentally turned the characters on the wing incorrectly. I'm sorry and it's a great disgrace to me. Here is a link to download the patched skin:

correct B-31_30BiLP_11_46

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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Otto Smik

Smik.md.jpg

 

Otto Smik (January 20, 1922, Bordjomi, Georgian SSR - November 28, 1944 near Zwolle, the Netherlands) was a Czechoslovak fighter pilot of Slovak-Jewish origin.

More details here:
Otto Smik (czech language)


Smik_BS461_222SQN_6_43

 

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Spitfire F.Mk.IXc, BS461, ZDoH, from the 222nd (Natal) Squadron, where Otto Smik worked after the forced departure from the Czechoslovak Squadron, June 1943.

 

Smik_MJ291_310SQN_8_6_44

 

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Spitfire L.F Mk.IXc. MJ291, NNoN, from the 310th Squadron, where Otto Smik began his second operational tour in the form of the invasion of Normandy.

 

Smik_ML296_312SQN_8_44

 

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Spitfire HF.Mk.IXc, ML296, DUoN from the state of the 312th Squadron in the form from the day when Otto Smik was shot down over the occupied mainland and then with the help of the resistance managed to cross the invasion front.

 

Smik_RR227_127SQN_11_44

 

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Spitfire L.F.Mk.XVIe, RR227, 9NoR, from the condition of the 127th Squadron, which Otto Smik briefly commanded. It is a reconstruction of a possible color. On this aircraft, Smik was shot down on November 28, 1944 over the Dutch Zwolle.

 

Stead_TE184_Smik_repro_2019

 

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Spitfire L.F.Mk.XVI, TE184, G-MXVI, belonging to Stephen Stead, in a color reminiscent of the last Otto Smik aircraft. In recent years, this machine has been spending summer at Pilsen - Líně Airport.

 

 

 

Otto Smik spitfires skins

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First home

 

Prvni-doma.jpg


On September 17, 1944, four pilots of the 1st Czechoslovak Independent Fighter Regiment in the USSR landed at the Slovak airport Tri duby near Banská Bystrica. Symbolically, the path of Czechoslovak pilots on the fronts of World War II was closed. Although there was still a lot of lack of blood to return home permanently, it was the first time that real progress in the liberation of Czechoslovakia could be seen.
 

That day, the wheels of four Czechoslovak pilots, the regiment commander František Fajtl, his deputy Jan Klán, the commander of the first squadron František Chábera and the commander of the second squadron Josef Stehlík, touched Slovak soil. These were Lavochkiny La-5FN fuselage numbers 58, 39, 02 and 88.

Operation 1. ČsSSPl within the Slovak unprising is the longest recorded operation of the air unit behind the enemy line.

 

2020_11_3__16_9_44.md.png

 

The unit was established on July 3, 1944 in Kubinka in the USSR as part of General Krasovsky's 2nd Air Force. The commander was Capt. František Fajtl, Deputy Commander Capt. Jan Klán and squadron commanders lieutenant colonel. František Chábera and Lt. Col. Josef Stehlík. It was armed with modern Soviet Lavochkin La-5FN fighters. It began combat operations with a patrol flight of 5 aircraft on September 10.


Regiment in the SNP
 

After the start of the SNP, commanders flew on 4 aircraft on September 15, 1944 to the airport Tri Duby to explore the possibility of operating directly from the insurgent territory. Lt. Col. remained due to injuries. Stehlík in Slovakia and with the aircraft La-5FN fuselage number 88. The other three commanders flew back. After reporting, General Krasovsky decided to move the entire regiment.

2020_11_3__16_12_19.md.png
 

On September 17, 1944, the remaining 21 aircraft departed. During the stopover in Krosno, the La-5FN fuselage number 95 of the pilot Rudolf Borovec was damaged. On the same day, 20 aircraft landed at the Zolná u Zvolena airfield [1]. Zolná was chosen as a safer place compared to the often bombed Tri Oaks base. The regiment also tried to deploy at the unsatisfactory field airport Rohozna and later in October 1944, the regiment moved to Tri Duby, because Zolna was no longer usable for the muddy area. After arriving in Slovakia, the regiment became part of the 1st Czechoslovak Army in Slovakia and managed to gain dominance over the airspace of the insurgent territory (even with the help of the Allied Air Force (15th Air Force USAAF), which destroyed the German-used air base Malacky.

2020_11_3__16_10_32.md.png
 

The first and at the same time one of the most important operations was a raid on the airport in Piešťany carried out on September 18, 1944. At the airport in Piešťany, before a survey of the combined squadron found the presence of 30 German aircraft (types Ju-88, Ju-87, Bf-109 and Fw -189). The raid was carried out by an eight-member group led by the commander of Lieutenant Stehlík's first squadron, taking advantage of the moment of surprise and destroying 10 enemy aircraft on the ground, probably also destroying another 10 (or severely damaging it) and damaging the remaining 10. The pilots also supported ground insurgent units on the fronts and, in addition to fighter tasks, also performed bombing, combat and reconnaissance tasks. Combat activities were provided by Slovak and Soviet ground personnel. Ammunition, fuel and spare parts were supplied by the 6th Air Force of General Krasovsky by air bridge. On October 25, 1944, the regiment was evacuated. 11 airworthy aircraft flew in the direction of Poland and Romania, the twelfth was damaged during takeoff. After the retreat of the insurgents to the mountains, it was not possible to evacuate all ground and air personnel.

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To this day, its pilots have made 573 combat flights lasting 376 operating hours, recording 9 confirmed and 10 probable victories of enemy aircraft. 11 enemy aircraft destroyed on the ground. They also destroyed 77 trucks and 13 cars, 3 artillery and 3 mortar batteries, 2 tanks and 3 locomotives. The following perished in attacks on ground targets: Lt. Col. F. Vaculík, Lt. Col. B. Frost, and ppor. T. Motyčka. They died in the mountains as partisans: Lt. R. Borovec, ppor. Medvedev and Sgt Shaposhnikov.


New download First Home

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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Combined flight
 

SNP.md.jpg
 

The Slovak National Uprising (Slovak: Slovenské národné povstanie, abbreviated SNP) was an armed insurrection organized by the Slovak resistance movement during World War II. This resistance movement was represented mainly by the members of the Democratic Party, but also by social democrats and Communists, albeit on a smaller scale. It was launched on 29 August 1944 from Banská Bystrica in an attempt to resist German troops that had occupied Slovak territory and to overthrow the collaborationist government of Jozef Tiso. Although the resistance was largely defeated by German forces, guerrilla operations continued until the Soviet Army, Czechoslovak Army and Romanian Army liberated Fascist Slovakia in 1945.
 

In the post-war period, many political entities, mainly the Communists, attempted to "hijack" the uprising to their credit. The Communist regime in Czechoslovakia presented the Uprising as an event initiated and governed by Communist forces. Slovak ultranationalists, on the other hand, claim that the uprising was a plot against the Slovak nation, as one of its main objectives was to oust the regime of the puppet Slovak state and reestablish Czechoslovakia, in which Slovaks were dominated by Czechs. In fact, many factions fought in the uprising, the largest of which were units of the Slovak Army, Democratic resistance, Communist partisans, and international forces. Given this factionalization, the Uprising did not have unambiguous popular support. Yet the participants and supporters of the Uprising represented every religion, class, age, and anti-Nazi political faction of the Slovak nation.
 

SVZ_SNP_131485_9_44

 

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Ju52 / 3m with saloon interior, the aircraft was destroyed in a German raid on the airport Tri duby.


SVZ_SNP_161725_9_44

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Bf-109G-6 / R3 W.Nr. 161725 made in the factory in Regensburg, from the combined squadron. The aircraft was destroyed during a Luftwaffe raid on Tri duby Airport on September 10, 1944


SVZ_SNP_161742_9_44

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Bf-109G-6 / R3 W.Nr. 161742 made the same as the previous one in Regensburg, shown as it looked during a rich combat career in the state of the Combined Squadron. The plane crashed and was destroyed on October 25, 1944 near Hermanovce.


Download SNP 1944

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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Thank you for the skins. But there is something wrong with the link for "First Home". Only La-5FN No.88 is downloaded. Nos  02 and 39 are missing.

 

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19 hours ago, technic said:

Thank you for the skins. But there is something wrong with the link for "First Home". Only La-5FN No.88 is downloaded. Nos  02 and 39 are missing.

 


I'm very sorry, the file seems corrupt. To check I download and I have 39 and 88. Here's a new download:
New download First Home

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La-5FN over Silesia

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Czechoslovak pilots above Ostrava II

Lavochkin La-5FN

 

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1. ČSSLP aircraft in the form from the time of the Ostrava operation in 1945.

 

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Stehlik_1CSSPL_39_11_1944

Setvak_1CSSPL_48_Poremba_45

Kostik_1CSSPL_95_Poremba_45
 

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Download La-5FN over Silesia


 

Lavochkin La-5FN in the post-war service

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The post-war Czechoslovak Air Force became the only foreign user of this type. Later, the Czechoslovak La-5FN was redesignated the S-95 and La-5UTI on the CS-95. The issue of further use of heavily worn La-5FNs was addressed from 3 to 18 July 1946 by a commission of Soviet experts, which disabled all but one of the La-5s. For MS. air force, which still in November 1946 had 3 La-5UTI and 13 La-5FN in the 2nd Fighter Air Regiment and 11 La-5FN in the 1st Fighter Regiment, this decision would mean a significant loss, especially after the unrealized delivery of 60 La-7 aircraft . The Commission of Czechoslovak Military and Civilian Experts therefore proposed in the protocol of 4 October 1946 only to ban aerobatics on aircraft stationed in Piešťany and, in view of the relatively good condition of the aircraft at Tri Duby Airport, to carry out normal training flights. On December 13, 1946, however, the MNO declared a total ban on flying the La-5, which complied with the recommendation of the Second Soviet Commission of December 1946. After breaking tests of selected pieces of S-95, which took place during 1947 in VLU in Prague Letnany, was allowed to resume operation of 23 machines S-95 and one CS-95 (as of July 1, 1948). These aircraft were already at the very end of their life and were gradually decommissioned. The last airworthy machine was the CS-95 (B-4998), which was still in 1950 in the state of aviation security.


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Aircraft of the 1st and 2nd Air Regiment of the Czechoslovak Air Force
1LP_Piestany_1946
2LP_Piestany_1946

 

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Aircraft of the Aviation Academy of the 4th Training Squadron, Pieštany 1947
4CL_Piestany_1947

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Download Czechoslovak La-5FN in postwar service

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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Lovely skins! Some people say that the RAF ad boring camo which I can understand compared to the Luftwaffe's endless different varieties, but when skinned well I think it looks great.

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Nobody Knows - Petlyakov B-32

Nikdo.md.jpg

 

Thirty-two Pe-2 FT aircraft and three training UPe-2s arrived in May 1946 at Kbely Airport in Prague. In the period from June 20 to August 1, 1946, under the leadership of Soviet instructors Capt. Panteleev and Lt. Katajeva held a retraining course for Czechoslovak flying and ground staff. Already on May 9, 1946, a bomber air regiment was established, where most of the Pe-2 aircraft were included after the retraining course. The rest of the aircraft was stored as a backup.

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The machines included in the 1st Squadron of the Bomber Regiment bore the designation of affiliation with the letters LV. The basis of the 2nd Squadron under construction were aircraft marked with the letters MU. In the summer of 1947, the Czechoslovak Air Force operated with UPe-2 LV-1 and LV-2 and Pe-2FT LV-5 to LV-14 and MU-3 to MU-5 and MU-9 to MU-13. On July 14, 1947, the regiment flew to Slovakia. Petljakov served in Czechoslovakia from October 1947 under the designation B / CB-32 until mid-1951.

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To this day, aviation historians cannot agree on whether the camouflage of the B-32 aircraft was done in three-tone or two-tone coloring of the upper surfaces.

To be sure, I did both.


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We have a choice of the aircraft of the 1st Squadron LV-14 and the machine of the 2nd Squadron MU-12 from 1947.

Download Nobody Knows

Skin for Pe-2 ser.87 !

Edited by ATA_Ringlett

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Hurricane Mk.IIc
 

I didn't hold on today and as soon as I could I made a skin for the Hurricane BE581 famous plane called Night Reaper. The skin contained in the game is an obsolete reconstruction over forty years old.

Here is the plane Karel Kuttelwascher as he really looked.

utove-Hurricanu-stare-znaky-A-seda-evide

 

Karel M. Kuttelwascher, DFC & bar
 

brig. gene. in. memoriam, F / Lt RAF No. 787696 (111519), fighter pilot
* September 23, 1916 Holy Cross at Německý (Havlíčkův Brod)
† 18 August 1959 Truro, Cornwall, UK

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He fought in the French Air Force (Armée de l'Air) and the British Royal Air Force (Royal Air Force).

Karel Miloslav was born on September 23, 1916 in Svatý Kříž near Německý (now Havlíčkův Brod). At the age of eighteen, he volunteered for the Air Force. After the occupation, he got through France to Poland, where he was forced to join the Foreign Legion. When the war broke out, he and other pilots were transferred to the Armée de l'Air to GC III / 3. At the turn of spring and summer 1940 he achieved two victories. From defeated France, he traveled via Algeria and Gibraltar to Great Britain. In the Royal Air Force, he was assigned to the 1st Fighter Squadron with Hawker Hurricane machines. During 1941, he destroyed three Messerschmitt Bf-109s. On the moonlit nights of April 1942, the unit launched the Night Intruder operation - these consisted of individual attacks on Luftwaffe bombers around their airports in the French hinterland. Used Hurricany Mk. IIc were armed with four 20 mm cannons and carried additional tanks to increase flight time up to 3.5 hours. Kuttelwascher recorded 15 certain victories in these dangerous actions, while he shot down three Heinkel He-111s at St. André on the night of May 4-5, in just four minutes. From July, he continued night operations with the 23rd Squadron on a Mosquito machine, but no longer saw the enemy. In June, he was withdrawn from operational service and sent on a six-month promotional trip to the United States and Canada. At the end of the war, he worked as a flying pilot.

He returned to his homeland in August 1945, but less than a year later, due to dislike for the post-war Czechoslovak Republic, he went back to Britain to visit his wife Ruby and children - son Huw and twins Vee and Mari. He then piloted transport aircraft there at BEA. However, he died suddenly on the night of August 18, 1959, while on holiday in southern England. He succumbed to a heart attack.


He received a number of awards for his extraordinary performances. Particularly exceptional is the double award of the British Meritorious Air Cross DFC shortly after each other. With a total of 20 certain victories, he is our most successful fighter. In May 2000 he was promoted to brigadier general in memoriam. On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of his death, a memorial plaque was unveiled at his birthplace. In 1993, Kuttelwascher's biography entitled Night Hawk was published in our country. It was written by Roger Darlington, his son-in-law.


28.10.2016 was gen. Karel Kuttelwascher was granted the Order of the White Lion in memoriam.
 

BE581_Really_NightReaper_4_42
Hurricane Mk.IIc in the form from the beginning of the Night Intruder operations of April 1942.
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The image from the beginning of May 1942 is photographically documented during the visit of war reporters to the 1st Squadron of the RAF.
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June 1942 when Night Intruder operations were in full swing. The aircraft is captured after the change of sovereign characters according to the new regulation.
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BE581_Really_NightReaper_7_42
July 1942, the end of K. Kuttelwascher's operation in the 1st Squadron, the aircraft as it probably looked after a complete change of designation according to regulations of May 1942.
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The aircraft probably never actually bore an emblem with a scythe and the inscription Night Reaper, it was a nickname that K.K. English journalists. In the USA, he was known for the change under the journalistic nickname Night Hawk.

Download REAL Night Reaper

 

And a video from the interview of the English weekly with Karel Kuttelwascher.


Interwiew

Edited by ATA_Ringlett
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Night Fighters on Hurricane Mk.IIb / c

NF-I.md.jpg
 

HL605_IIc_Posluzny_32SQN_summer_1942

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Ondřej Poslužný was born on August 5, 1914 in Brno, where he also attended high school and where he graduated. In Czechoslovakia. Army enlisted in the Air Force and became a pilot. After the occupation of the republic, he fled abroad. He was accepted, like many other Czechoslovaks, into the French Foreign Legion. After the declaration of war, he was immediately transferred to the French fighter group III / 4 in Casablanca, Morocco, where he began retraining for probably the best French fighter Dewoitine D.520.
He was no longer able to intervene in the fighting in Europe, or in the fighting for France, but he made up for everything after his arrival in Great Britain, where he got together with our other pilots by ship through Gibraltar.

He joined the 310th Czechoslovak Fighter Squadron RAF, where he flew until March 1941. He was later transferred to the 19th and then 118th British Fighter Squadron. From March 1942 he served in the ranks of the 32nd British Fighter Squadron, which was assigned to command the Squadron A.

On June 25, 1942, a squadron, armed at the time, already relatively obsolete Hawker Hurricanes, launched an attack on ships moored off the French coast. The fighters carried light bombs under their wings. During the raid, the Servants' aircraft was damaged by German anti-aircraft fire so severely that the pilot had to jump out on the return journey over the English Channel.
Fast British lifeboats could not find him, so he was declared missing after the prescribed time. His dead body was not washed up by the sea until 4 July 1942 on the French coast at Pas-de-Calais. He was buried in the military cemetery in Etaples. In 1991 he was promoted to colonel in memoriam.

Download Night Fighters I

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Fokker (MÁG) D.VII
 

In the Czechoslovak Air Force served in the years 1918 - 1925 the only Fokker D.VII aircraft produced by the Hungarian company MÁG. Here it is captured in several different forms over time.

 

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Download CSR Fokker D.VII

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Bloody Foreigners
 

cizaci.md.jpg

Z3437_IIb_312SQN_Kucera_6_41

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Aircraft Z3437 version Mk.IIb from the state of the 312th Czechoslovak Squadron RAF when Otmar Kučera flew on this machine. The aircraft is shown in the form before just changing the color scheme.


Download Bloody Foreigners

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I. From the Foreign Legion to the French Air Force

 

2807_Charvat_Spa315_9_1918

 

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Spad XIII v.č.2807 Spa.315

Augustin Charvát was a tailor who went to France for experience in his craft. After the outbreak of the First World War, he enlisted in the Foreing Legion and later, after being wounded, enlisted in the French Air Force. He first flew on the Farmans at F.58 and then at Spa.315. He scored one confirmed and two probable victories. After the war he served in the Czechoslovak Air Force in the rank of lieutenant. He died in the crash of the Š-16 bomber in 1931.


8875_Pilat_Spa124_Francie_autumn_1918

 

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Spad XIII v.č.8875 Spa.124 "Jeanne D´Arc"

Václav Pilát another of the Czech volunteers at the Foreing Legion took part in the fighting of the Great War within the Company Nazdar, he was wounded at Reims. After flight training, he joined the C.104 and in 1917 at the fighter Spa.124, probably achieved one victory.

 

 

 

II. Post-war service

 

 

9151_CSR_33L_LP2_summer_1924

 

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Spad XII v.č. 9151 33rd Squadron Air Regiment 2

In 1921, the Czechoslovak Air Force in France purchased a new aircraft SPAD XIII C.1 as a replacement for the flying machines. One of them was Spad 9151, with which Corporal Siegl crashed at Lípa Airport near Německý Brod.


91xx_CSR_32L_LP2_1924

 

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Spad XIII v.č.nonná 32nd Squadron Air Regiment 2

Another aircraft from the French acquisition in the form of 1924.


Download Czechoslovak Spad XIII

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Hawker Hurricane Mk.II
 

cz-hurry-I.md.jpg

 

Z2770_IIa_310SQN_Kimlicka_3_41

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Hurricane Mk.IIa from the 310th Squadron. Bohuslav Kimlička's personal machine in the form from March 1941. The Czechoslovak emblem is used on the aircraft. Air Force which was not practically used in this unit. The machine ended in 1942 after overhaul in the Soviet Union, it was delivered through the port of Murmansk.
 

Z3437_IIb_312SQN_Kucera_8_41

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Hurricane Mk.IIb by Otmar Kučera in the form from August 1941 at the time when it was used by the 312th Squadron.


Z3660_IIb_312SQN_Vasatko_7_41

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Hurricane Mk.IIb Alois Vašátko, 312nd Squadron, in July 1941 at Kenley Airport. At that time, Alois Vašátko acted as commander of the 312th Squadron and his aircraft carries, according to RAF customs, a flag symbolizing his rank on the panel under the cabin.


Download Czechoslovakian Hurricane p.I

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Spitfire Mk.Vb of Czechoslovakian pilots

Hruby_111SQN_W3310_12_41

 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb W3310 from the state of the 111th Squadron of the RAF, in the form when Otakar Hrubý flew on it, in the winter of 1941/42, the squadron was deployed at Debden Airport as a night fighter.

 

Kotiba_124SQN_AA920_5_42

 

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Spitfire Mk.Vb, AA920 from the 124th Squadron, where František Kotiba often flew on it. The aircraft is shown in the form from May 1942 when the squadron operated from Biggin Hill Airport.

 

Kresta_313SQN_AD384_4_42

 

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Spitfire MkVb, AD384, Parker Pen Spitfire, No 313 czechoslovak fighter squadron.  Shot down April 12 1942, during the raid on Hazebrouck. Pilot Sgt. Otakar Kresta became POW

 

Download Czechoslovakian Spitfire Mk.Vb

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