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Reviving The Volkswaffe: My VW Beetle Restoration


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Howdy all!

I'm proud to say that I've come into the possession of a rare Volkswaffe fighter, and have chosen to restore it! If you don't know about the Volkswaffe is, check out the documentary below:

 

All jokes aside, I've come into possession of a 1974 Volkswagen Beetle and have started work on restoring it.

My car is a part of a special edition called the Sunbug, which was just a package that included a sun roof top (not vinyl top, the hard top sunroof), a special gold paint color, some decals, and some unique interior parts. Unfortunately, the interior parts and decals are long down the road. Originally, it was a college graduation gift for my cousin. However, it suffered from a poor repair job, and the classic engine fire problem beetles run into. So the car was totaled, bought back from the insurance company, and thrown outside to sit for a long while. I ended up getting the car when my aunt and uncle decided to move from where they live here in Washington to Nevada, and they offered it to my dad and I for free. So we went to get the car, and we've made some slow progress up to now.

 

Here is the most complete picture I have of the car:

YmdXEb3.jpg

 

The first thing we did was remove the fenders to add ease of access to work on the body. Then we turned to the frame of the car, because it's floor pans were rusted in a few places, and had been patched by a cookie sheet in another. I don't have any pictures of the VERY fascinating progress of us cutting out, removing spot welds, making a clean surface to weld the new pans on, and welding them on, but here we are fitting the new pans in:

GVtoe2a.jpg

While we had the frame in this position, we also completely replaced the steering and brake system. Luckily, the transaxle is completely fine, so we could leave it as is.

 

In the mean time, we just left the fender-less body outside.

xTbeDKR.jpg

 

After we welded the pans in, we attached the car's rebuilt pancake engine to the transaxle, and did a test fit with the frame on. The reason we did this was because the car has a shroud over the engine, and we just wanted to see what clearance we would have.

p9Splz1.jpg

 

Now that the weather is getting nicer, and I am done with school for a few months, I've been getting more into gear on getting the car into running.

First what we will be needing to do is get the car's body ready to paint since we are returning it to it's factory color of Harvest Gold (paint code L89C). Work wise, this means prepping the inside.

 

As you can see, I already removed the dashboard, but there is a lot of soot everywhere from the engine fire, so most of the work will be cleaning it off so we have a clean surface to spray primer on. You can see the factory color where the dash was, because it turns out my uncle was a lazy painter.

cVaRHm2.jpg

 

In the rear of the car, there is a storage compartment with paper soundproofing, a vinyl floor mat, and a lot of silicone that had to be removed. SBkk0Fn.jpg

 

Before I start to clean all the soot off of surfaces, I also had to remove some other things from the car, such as the steering column, wiring, and also weather seals that were in the doors.

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https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/235561070457126922/722637116831432774/Snapchat-770453068.jpg

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As mentioned, my next steps will to remove all the soot from surfaces we will be painting, removing parts we wont' want painted like door handles, and also listing parts that will need to be bought (like new weather seals, door limiters, a new steering wheel).

 

If there is any interest, I can post more pictures as we move along to get the car in working condition! The current time frame to finish is September, but we'll have to see. :)

 

Thanks for reading!

Milo

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8 minutes ago, [CPT]milopugdog said:

If there is any interest, I can post more pictures as we move along to get the car in working condition! The current time frame to finish is September, but we'll have to see. :)

Out of reactions fot the day, but great seeing you doing this. What was once mundane can be a special beauty today by the sheer effort you put into it. Love to see how you‘ll do restoring it.

 

Having some experiene in operating vintage cars, let me just recommend you this: find the best car restorer there is that you can get a hold on that knows this kind of vehicles and don‘t be shy asking for advice, even if it costs you. I don‘t know how many such projects you have made, but in my experience, people all make the same mistakes. Every car is different. Learn about what can go wrong. It will save you a lot of money and nerves later on. Like waiting for AAA on an I-5 onramp to tow you clear.

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54 minutes ago, ZachariasX said:

Out of reactions fot the day, but great seeing you doing this. What was once mundane can be a special beauty today by the sheer effort you put into it. Love to see how you‘ll do restoring it.

 

Having some experiene in operating vintage cars, let me just recommend you this: find the best car restorer there is that you can get a hold on that knows this kind of vehicles and don‘t be shy asking for advice, even if it costs you. I don‘t know how many such projects you have made, but in my experience, people all make the same mistakes. Every car is different. Learn about what can go wrong. It will save you a lot of money and nerves later on. Like waiting for AAA on an I-5 onramp to tow you clear.

Haha I appreciate the advice. 😄

 

I'm working on it with my old man, who has been fixing cars his whole life. There's also a lot of folks out here that know the VW specific stuff though, because he mainly does cars domestic to the US.

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It seems like there is a bit of interest, so I'll keep posting updates since I'm taking pictures to assist with putting everything back together anyway.

So, another day means more parts removed!

 

Unfortunately, the weather over here has gotten stormy so we had to roll her inside. However, while the weather was still nice, the decision was made that we would have the whole car's body media blasted instead of just the burnt portion. This will give us a nice clean surface to prime and paint on the inside and outside of the car.

 

So that of course means removing anything we don't want to be sprayed. Which isn't much, but the doors, windshield, and bonnet are mostly in-tact.

Here's the driver's door before I started on it:

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wcMf8Ry.jpg

 

These doors are uniquely a pain in the ass. While there are very few bolts involved, the window needs to be unbolted to get it in a position where you can get its weather seals out. There SHOULD have been a felt guide for the door, but that's just one of the things that are mysteriously missing. Not that they'd be usable afterward anyway.

 

However, after that a few bolts and screws come out, and you're able to pull the vent window out. Next there's a chrome molding that has to be removed which is held in with clips. Usually these are ruined by pulling the felt guide out, so they weren't there! So in both doors, it was easily removed.

 

A close up of the window's seals. The left seal is held in with clips and can be pulled out with a flathead screwdriver once with window is lowered, but the seal on the left is attached to the silver molding and came out with it.

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bAhbz4s.jpg

 

Repeat these steps for both doors, and here's the result! A load of junk which will have to be cleaned, but hopefully reused. The upper pile is from the driver's door, while the bottom is from the passengers.

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b9j4KvC.jpg

 

In the end, I also ended up pulling the windows out since we would have to anyway eventually. But, here's the driver's door with all the window moldings and seals out. I'm just hoping putting it back together will be as simple. :)

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7cQ9jSB.jpg

 

Until next time!

Milo

Edited by [CPT]milopugdog
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Great I use to have an ‘ 72  1300 also with a steelroof, take the time for the drain and the drive of the steelroof as they are prone to leaking and failures 

I do right now have an Karman Ghia ‘73, US import btw, thats in more a less the same phase of restoration as yours. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Howdy again everyone!

 

Thanks for telling me about your cars; other people is actually one of the main reasons I'm so intent on fixing this car! I hail from a family of Ford Mustang people, and other folks in that community tend to be a little snobby, but classic VW people are usually pretty groovy :cool:

 

I haven't been doing much with the car lately besides ordering parts because the weather and internship work, but on my free days I have worked on her!

 

I removed the windshield using a technique found in this video:

 

And now I'm sanding off the base coat of paint to its primer to cut costs when we go to have her media blasted. I currently have the whole roof of the car sanded, and part of the bonnet sanded down:

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When it comes to parts, I've been ordering everything from seals, headliners and it's various parts, gloveboxes, doorchecks, to the entire assembly for the car's deck lid and its accessories. 

So far I've probably spent about $1300? But hey, what do you expect when you have to rebuild the interior of a car, right?

 

Its not much, but it's honest work.

Until next time,

Milo

 

P.S.

Here's some pictures from my internship work:

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It's rock glacier surveying!

OmTHQgH.jpg

rTpeSYy.jpg

ta03Z2d.jpg

 

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47 minutes ago, [CPT]milopugdog said:

I hail from a family of Ford Mustang people, and other folks in that community tend to be a little snobby, but classic VW people are usually pretty groovy

It's the work you put into it that makes a classic a beauty.

 

Even the Mustangs, 40 years old cars, compared to what you get today, all drive like crap. It doesn't matter whether it is a Mustang (given Ford basically invented the feature list with that one and most vintage Mustangs came in pretty cheap and poor configurations originally), a Beetle or a 2CW.

 

As a kid, I hated those Beetles, 2CW, Fiat500... They were essentially road blocks, but fast enough that you often couldn't pass them, as a decent car of the 1970's was rather lame as well (compared to now).

 

But how cool are they now?

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Those cars will still be cool in 10 years (even more so!) when your new one will be nothing but "old". You can buy them at reasionable prices and you can restore them very well. Mustangs, at least the desireable ones come at considerably higher prices. And you ceretainly don't want one where previous owners were just tinkering around, making them anything but the car that left the assembly lane back then.

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14 minutes ago, ZachariasX said:

It's the work you put into it that makes a classic a beauty.

 

Even the Mustangs, 40 years old cars, compared to what you get today, all drive like crap. It doesn't matter whether it is a Mustang (given Ford basically invented the feature list with that one and most vintage Mustangs came in pretty cheap and poor configurations originally), a Beetle or a 2CW.

 

As a kid, I hated those Beetles, 2CW, Fiat500... They were essentially road blocks, but fast enough that you often couldn't pass them, as a decent car of the 1970's was rather lame as well (compared to now).

 

But how cool are they now?

  Reveal hidden contents

$_86.JPG

112955_Front_3-4_Web.JPG

11490931.jpg

 

 

Those cars will still be cool in 10 years (even more so!) when your new one will be nothing but "old". You can buy them at reasionable prices and you can restore them very well. Mustangs, at least the desireable ones come at considerably higher prices. And you ceretainly don't want one where previous owners were just tinkering around, making them anything but the car that left the assembly lane back then.

Aye,

But I'm not talking just about classic mustangs (which you're right about the handling of old cars), but also the owners of newer Mustangs as well. It could have just been the people at car shows I've interacted with. Although, many of those folks were of the older type. Many of the VW guys are like me, just young and having fun with it. I'm sure if younger folks could afford a classic muscle car, they'd be fine too.

 

And I'm sure driving at highway speeds will be fun with that little 1600 E-motor. Drivers near me already get mad when you're 5 over the speed limit. :lol:

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31 minutes ago, [CPT]milopugdog said:

And I'm sure driving at highway speeds will be fun with that little 1600 E-motor. Drivers near me already get mad when you're 5 over the speed limit.

It's never the engine that worries me in old cars, it's the brakes. In todays traffic, when you give enough room to the one ahead of you, you constantly have folks cutting in front of you. Nobody thinks that vintage cars have brakes like a train. Especially if you have drum brakes.

 

This is the problem with muscle cars, if you care to operate them as original. The early GTO for instance came with four drum brakes. Even the first disc brakes are outwardly terrible. An arrangement that just made you fall off the road instead of just running into whatever you didn't want to run into right ahead of you. The vintage Mustang was a cheap compact car. Hardly anyone would get real suspension and decent disc barkes for it. While it is possible to retrofit (depending on regulations by your local DMV), it is not the car it was anymore. If you have such a car with 200 actual hp on the rear wheels, that is receipe for suicide if you are not experienced in handling those vehicles. 35 hp is all you need. I will never hand the keys of a powerful vintage car to a youngster.

 

However, if buy an Amilcar, you might want to get a "better" camshaft to have 30 hp insead of 12... No need telling anyone. ;)

 

People today just can't imagine how slow general traffic was 50 years ago.

 

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2 hours ago, ZachariasX said:

But how cool are they now?

 

Very! And I think a lot of the coolness stems from the lack if individualism and the lack of bolder design in modern cars. They all look kind of similar.

 

The cool thing about the 500 is that you can own the modern version of it and still drive a very cool car, as it has'n involved into a lifestyle-limo for dinks and yuppies that safe for the brand doesn't have anything in common with the original (*cough* Mini).

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11 hours ago, ZachariasX said:

It's never the engine that worries me in old cars, it's the brakes. In todays traffic, when you give enough room to the one ahead of you, you constantly have folks cutting in front of you. Nobody thinks that vintage cars have brakes like a train. Especially if you have drum brakes.

 

This is the problem with muscle cars, if you care to operate them as original. The early GTO for instance came with four drum brakes. Even the first disc brakes are outwardly terrible. An arrangement that just made you fall off the road instead of just running into whatever you didn't want to run into right ahead of you. The vintage Mustang was a cheap compact car. Hardly anyone would get real suspension and decent disc barkes for it. While it is possible to retrofit (depending on regulations by your local DMV), it is not the car it was anymore. If you have such a car with 200 actual hp on the rear wheels, that is receipe for suicide if you are not experienced in handling those vehicles. 35 hp is all you need. I will never hand the keys of a powerful vintage car to a youngster.

 

However, if buy an Amilcar, you might want to get a "better" camshaft to have 30 hp insead of 12... No need telling anyone. ;)

 

People today just can't imagine how slow general traffic was 50 years ago.

 

All the people I know with classic cars throw out the drum brakes for disc, unless they're one of those weird people who are trying to keep the car as stock as possible. There are kits for it, you can do it in your driveway.

 

Saying that 'youngsters' now can't drive cars like that is just downright silly, honestly, because judging by how many of them wound up in the junk yard, neither could 'youngsters' when they were new. But alas, most folks my age don't want those rusty pieces of crap anyways; they've moved onto the GTR and other imports because they aren't the same price as my damned college education.

 

9 hours ago, Bremspropeller said:

 

Very! And I think a lot of the coolness stems from the lack if individualism and the lack of bolder design in modern cars. They all look kind of similar.

 

*snip*

Ah yes, similar looking modern cars. There's in inside joke in my friend group; one of my friends has a Hyundai Elantra, and it is such a general looking car, that we purposefully get the name wrong whenever we talk about it. We usually go by calling it a Honda Civic, Ford Fusion, Nissan Ultima, etc, etc...

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28 minutes ago, [CPT]milopugdog said:

Saying that 'youngsters' now can't drive cars like that is just downright silly, honestly, because judging by how many of them wound up in the junk yard, neither could 'youngsters' when they were new. But alas, most folks my age don't want those rusty pieces of crap anyways; they've moved onto the GTR and other imports because they aren't the same price as my damned college education.

 

Today, most people can't drive high power vintage cars in todays traffic. That is what I was talking about. And you certainly don't hand the keys of a such to anyone, regardless of the age. With "youngsters" I was talking about the people today who can't imagine a car not doing what a car does today because they never drove vinatge cars. High power vintage cars are rather dangerous in regular operation compared to what you buy today. It's that what killed the muscle car of the 70's. Not the oil crisis. Someone had to pay insurance for all the accidents. So yes, they were dangerous to people back then, but way more so today. I-5 traffic 1970 has little in common with traffic today. If your Bug went to 60 mph in 6 seconds, you'd think again of safety. And taking that same corner at 60 mph that would not keep you from texting when driving a GTR could well be your last corner ever driving a 1970's car at that same speed. Old tyres can do that to you on new cars despite the car company blaming the driver. Just think of how you'd do in an old car.

 

And this is why I appreciate the Bug today. It's still fun when driving slow. With a 1970 Corvette, it takes a tad more discipline driving slow, despite it being way more fun doing so than a GTR.

 

I like your Bug. I'm sure you'll make it just perfect. Looking very much forward seeing the result.

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Lovely. I always love to see these beauties getting the love they deserve.

 

Here's my beloved '68 beetle "Eva"

IMG_20150528_203232.thumb.jpg.a4fd71e20c08ac2e473d37374deef8b7.jpg

Since this picture I have replaced her bumpers with euro single blade up front and T-bars in the back. also have swapped in OEM VW pop-out rear windows.

 

Lovingly welded back together and made whole. She has a 1700DP engine from a '71 and a transmission I built from 3 broken ones of various vintage 😄

A month after getting her on the road, my then girlfriend now wife and I drove her down from Canada along the Washington and Oregon coast to California. Best vehicle to road trip in. Heal-toe double clutch downshift for the win!!

 

My best friend has a '65 in near factory original mint condition as well.

 

Subscribed to this thread. Keep us up to date on the project!

 

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On 7/10/2020 at 11:08 AM, 40plus said:

Lovely. I always love to see these beauties getting the love they deserve.

 

Here's my beloved '68 beetle "Eva"

IMG_20150528_203232.thumb.jpg.a4fd71e20c08ac2e473d37374deef8b7.jpg

Since this picture I have replaced her bumpers with euro single blade up front and T-bars in the back. also have swapped in OEM VW pop-out rear windows.

 

Lovingly welded back together and made whole. She has a 1700DP engine from a '71 and a transmission I built from 3 broken ones of various vintage 😄

A month after getting her on the road, my then girlfriend now wife and I drove her down from Canada along the Washington and Oregon coast to California. Best vehicle to road trip in. Heal-toe double clutch downshift for the win!!

 

My best friend has a '65 in near factory original mint condition as well.

 

Subscribed to this thread. Keep us up to date on the project!

 

That's a very nice looking bug! I especially like the rims on 'er.

 

I'm actually planning to do a similar drive down the coast, into Las Vegas, and then up through the mountains as a final farewell to free time before I get orders for my duty station.

Would you recommend anything comfort/preparation wise for a long trip like that? It's going to be around 2,500 mi round trip.

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4 hours ago, [CPT]milopugdog said:

That's a very nice looking bug! I especially like the rims on 'er.

 

I'm actually planning to do a similar drive down the coast, into Las Vegas, and then up through the mountains as a final farewell to free time before I get orders for my duty station.

Would you recommend anything comfort/preparation wise for a long trip like that? It's going to be around 2,500 mi round trip.

 

Hell yeh I can recomend some stuff.....tomorrow. I've have more than a few beers so naturally I'm about to login into a MP server....I only ever fly MP when a bit drunk.

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S!

 

 Seeing a Beetle on the road always makes me smile. A symphatetic looking car. We had one aeons ago, putted along nicely. One guy in town put a Porsche 2.7 litre engine on one, with a turbo installed. Needless to say that Beetle surprised many cars at the time 😄 It was built as sleeper as possible.

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On 7/16/2020 at 2:08 AM, LLv34_Flanker said:

S!

 

 Seeing a Beetle on the road always makes me smile. A symphatetic looking car. We had one aeons ago, putted along nicely. One guy in town put a Porsche 2.7 litre engine on one, with a turbo installed. Needless to say that Beetle surprised many cars at the time 😄 It was built as sleeper as possible.

My old man one time that there was a Beetle that cruised around the street racing scene here called the 'Wunder Muffin'; had a Chevy small block in it... Sounds like a scary car...

 

So I haven't been able to work on her too much because of more research work, but I've been working the grind stone these last few days...

 

I cleaned out under the bonnet. There was still the old cardboard glovebox, and the latch for it still attached. I also took out the handle from the bonnet lid so it couldn't lock anymore. Then I had to completely remove the bonnet to get to some old torn up aluminum heating ducts.

This is where the front of the car stand right now, look at that pretty gold color in the sun!

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I've finished sanding off the bonnet, of course:

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I had to fix the rails that the side windows come up and down on. There's a curved mechanism that goes inside the door, and it somehow got raised up and almost into the window frame, which wouldn't allow me to install the window's molding down the line.

Here's what the piece looks like fully in the door like it's supposed to be, you can see it kind of goes up into the bottom of the window frame:

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COM3DAN.jpg

 

And lastly, here's where she stands:

I've got the drivers side of the car sanded down to primer, with some parts of the window trim still yet to be gone over. Harder to reach yellow bits are okay, because I'm planning on having the primer and whatever is left of the paint media blasted down.

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I've also got a bunch of new parts like chrome interior door latches, chrome window handles, running boards, and a front carpet kit.

 

That's all for now! Slow but constant progress is key. 💪

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In the early 70-ies i occasionally drove a 1600 half automatic one owned by my sisters friend who had it because of a wooden leg.

Sort of a fun car with a lot of power but it was quite thirsty. Good luck with the job ...

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By the gods your metalwork is in immaculate shape! I'm most impressed by the bonnet. I just spent the weekend re-spraying my bonnet, deck lid and doors after extensive welding, filling and sanding to replace evaporated steel. I task left undone from my initial restoration.

 

You have a pretty solid example there.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello again everyone!

 

Work has been far and between because my weird mountain work schedule. Nonetheless, here's what I've done since my last post:

 

The other side of the car has been sanded!

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The other day, we installed the floor pan seal, and mounted the body to the frame. So this is just a seal that sits between the floor pans and the body of the car. The process wasn't particularly interesting; it involved cleaning up the mating surface which still had some old melted seal material on it...

 

Then we took a wire wheel to get whatever adhesive was left off, cut the new seal which was a big continuous strip to shape, glue it down, and then lower the body and bolt 'er down!

Here's everything when I started:

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Here's what it looked like right as we set the body down:

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jZykRcc.jpg

 

 

 

Then the next step was to bolt the floor pans to the body along the outside using the bolts pictured in the parts picture, and there you go! One bug body mounted and sealed to it's frame.

 

We've also gone and dropped the fenders, bonnet, and sunroof panel at the media blaster's to get... media blasted.

 

So this isn't so short, I'd also like to write about what I'd like to get the car to be.

My plan is to get the car looking like a Cal look bug, I don't really know how to define it, but this picture sums it up best:

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https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/742292124908781569/742292194056077362/California-Style-Beetle-1800px.jpg

 

While we aren't doing everything in that diagram, I do plan on the car looking something along the lines of this:

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https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/742292124908781569/742292163970203678/ebay1021092.jpg

 

So that's it for now!

Again, thank you all for your responses; I'm not heading back into the mountains for a bit this time, so hopefully I'll be able to respond properly to y'all in a timely manner.

 

Cheers!

:P

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Ha! And here I am de-coverting a set of doors from single big window back to stock. Spent this past weekend rebuilding a set of vent windows and frames.

 

Project is look great. You're going way deeper than I did as I was lucky enough to not need to split the body-pan.

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13 hours ago, [CPT]milopugdog said:

 

My plan is to get the car looking like a Cal look bug, I don't really know how to define it, but this picture sums it up best:

  Hide contents

https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/742292124908781569/742292194056077362/California-Style-Beetle-1800px.jpg

 

 

Excellent idea, IMO the best custom style for Beetle. :good:

Edited by Sokol1
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5 hours ago, 40plus said:

Ha! And here I am de-coverting a set of doors from single big window back to stock. Spent this past weekend rebuilding a set of vent windows and frames.

 

Project is look great. You're going way deeper than I did as I was lucky enough to not need to split the body-pan.

I do like the vent windows since it gets rather warm here, and the car doesn't have AC. So those along side the pop out rear windows should make a nice draft.

 

And replacing it was my only option since the engine fire made the old one get very melted.

 

2 hours ago, Sokol1 said:

 

Excellent idea, IMO the best custom style for Beetle. :good:

Very much so! I love the T-bars; and even though I think they're illegal in my state, I'm still going to put them on :ph34r:.

I'm also looking at getting a chrome roof and decklid rack with ebony oak slats further down the line.

Spoiler

VW-beetle-Chrome-Roof-Rack-Black-Oak-Slots.jpg

decklidrack-black.jpg

 

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10 minutes ago, [CPT]milopugdog said:

So those along side the pop out rear windows should make a nice draft.

That‘s the difference between the Beetle and a desirable muscle cars of the era. In the Beatle, you get a nice draft. In the muscle car, the draft is always hot and what feels like 95% humidity is actually a 50/50 mixture of oil and water vapor.

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3 hours ago, ZachariasX said:

That‘s the difference between the Beetle and a desirable muscle cars of the era. In the Beatle, you get a nice draft. In the muscle car, the draft is always hot and what feels like 95% humidity is actually a 50/50 mixture of oil and water vapor.

and also Beetles are cool in their own way. I usually see more people my age with Beetle shirts on than classic muscle cars. :cool:

 

2 hours ago, 40plus said:

I have the roof rack with Oak slats but no deck-lid rack.

The deck lid rack is technically not supposed to fit on a car past 1967 because they changed the bumper mounts. BUT, I'm not going to use my impact bumpers. so I'll have to modify the car to fit the t-bars, which isn't difficult, and then the cargo rack will attach to those in the rear.

Spoiler

See the source image

 

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15 hours ago, [CPT]milopugdog said:

and also Beetles are cool in their own way. I usually see more people my age with Beetle shirts on than classic muscle cars. :cool:

 

The deck lid rack is technically not supposed to fit on a car past 1967 because they changed the bumper mounts. BUT, I'm not going to use my impact bumpers. so I'll have to modify the car to fit the t-bars, which isn't difficult, and then the cargo rack will attach to those in the rear.

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See the source image

 

 

Two thumbs up for T-bars. Eva has a nice looking rump.

 

IMG_20200804_160458743_HDR~01.jpg

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  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Hey all!

I picked up the car from the media blaster yesterday. This is the first step in getting the car on its way to getting where I need it, but there's still lots to do!

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There is also a few more rust holes and areas that will need some body filler or a brazing rod put to them. So I will have to learn techniques for that...

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This one is more bullet hole sized, so sheet metal will probably have to be welded here.

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Until next time!

Milo

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What a nice thread, I wish you luck in the restoration process!

I was gifted a barely-running 1969 Beetle for my eighteenth birthday a long time ago; I have many happy (and unhappy!) memories of working on it with my Pops, usually in the cold dark of a British winter, haha. It was a lovely thing to drive and I had a lot of fun with it, unfortunately the running costs (mostly repairs) were a little too high for me at the time and so a reluctant sale was made.

 

 

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Mine had rot in many of the same places. Lots of cutting, fabricating and welding. It's a hell of a lot of fun.

 

I've just finished painting my driver's side door (2nd attempt, wasn't happy with the finish first time around) and have ordered new interior door panels. I'm also about to strip my high-back seats and cut them down to low-back.....little winter project for me.

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Thanks again for the replies and support, everyone! I'll try to respond to you all in one post so it doesn't get too crowded in here :)

 

20 hours ago, messsucher said:

That is nice, boxer motor on the rear. Good feelings car.

It is a very nice aesthetic. We've got a rebuilt 1600 to throw on.

 

20 hours ago, Leifr said:

What a nice thread, I wish you luck in the restoration process!

I was gifted a barely-running 1969 Beetle for my eighteenth birthday a long time ago; I have many happy (and unhappy!) memories of working on it with my Pops, usually in the cold dark of a British winter, haha. It was a lovely thing to drive and I had a lot of fun with it, unfortunately the running costs (mostly repairs) were a little too high for me at the time and so a reluctant sale was made.

 

 

Thank you! I've already bought a large amount of parts, probably reaching into the $3k USD range now with the body being blasted.

I can't say I'm much older than you were when you got your VW, only this is essentially my college graduation gift to myself & Lieutenant car. I'm also working on it with the supervision and help of my pops, who's much more experienced in just about everything. He used to drag race a Mustang Fastback a few eons ago. :P

 

They seem fantastically simple, and I've found that the community that surrounds them is just amazing. I mean, look at this thread! It's a bit of a shame to had to sell it, but I get the need to have a functioning car that doesn't constantly need work. I'd also imagine they might not have had the same charm the survivor cars have today...

 

When she gets running I'm hoping to take a huge road trip down to my home in Seattle to LA, Vegas, then back up. But we'll see!

 

11 hours ago, Sokol1 said:

Good progress.

 

Use brass weld torch in this body small holes, and cut an square and replace the metal in the big hole.

 

BTW - The best Beetle mechanic around. 😁

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwUpr3jwZso

 

That's what we're planning to do. We've got a MIG welder for the larger hole, and have plans to inquire about the weld torch (the aforementioned brazing rod) at the welding place so we can get hooked up with the correct settings.

 

And I did see their video about a general tune of her car, but I've found that videos by a guy called Chris Vallone are much more applicable to me right now; he shows how to do stuff like install headliners, properly set up sunroofs, and sound proofing instead of general maintenance like the channel you posted.

 

Chris' channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/brighteyefilms

 

 

10 hours ago, 40plus said:

Mine had rot in many of the same places. Lots of cutting, fabricating and welding. It's a hell of a lot of fun.

 

I've just finished painting my driver's side door (2nd attempt, wasn't happy with the finish first time around) and have ordered new interior door panels. I'm also about to strip my high-back seats and cut them down to low-back.....little winter project for me.

Yes, we're going to be very careful with the paint to get it looking nice. But isn't it nice how much aftermarket support these cars get? You can order factory headliners, carpet kits, and door cards like you did for very little coin. When it comes to the seats, I've debated whether to get low-backs or high-backs, but I ended up getting high-backs. The stock seats were trashed, so we threw them out and got some nice ones off Summit Racing's website.

 

Until next time!

Milo

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

Hey all!

 

It's been a while since the last update because work has been slow, but I have been making progress on the car! I've been doing a lot of body work, which has been getting held up at the point of sanding due to me having to do it outside on the very limited free days on the weekends.

 

Although, I can finally show you some complete progress now that I have.

So just for the best example of what I've been getting up to, I'll show you the transition on the car's roof.

Bare metal from the blaster's:

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Covered in body filler:

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Sanded down:

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Aside from some holes in the left side door and in the left half-moon fresh air vent, I think you would be surprised how good the condition of the car is!

I also had to apply some filler to the rear fenders, but it is because they had dents instead of rust holes. (I haven't gotten to sand them yet) :)

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And for one last thing, I fit the rear apron on for fun before I applied the body filler to the fenders. And it almost looks like a car!

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I'm currently talking to a paint shop about getting 'er all done up in her original colors. The original plan was to paint it myself, but I think I'd rather just dish out some cash for someone that actually knows what they're doing. :P

Depending on the price, how fast I can get the body filler done, and their schedule; she might have paint on before spring! But let's not jinx it.

 

 

Until then!

Milo

:drinks:

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  • 5 weeks later...

Hey all!

 

It's been a month, and that means it's time to show you all the nothing I've been getting up to!

 

There were some pretty nasty holes in the passenger rear wheel well and engine deck, so I did some fiberglass work to cover them up. They'll all have undercoating sprayed over when she's done, so they didn't really have to be pretty.

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Bondo on my rear fenders has been applied, sanded, and repeated in that cycle about 4 times but now I'm happy with it. Therefore, I checked off those off my list of things to fix and took them off.

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There were multiple holes drilled in the passenger side door for after market mirrors. I am not very sure why whoever owned the car before my uncle, and my uncle wouldn't buy a mirror that mounts in the door hinge like this:

See the source image

 

BUT, I welded the holes shut and then ground down any excess material. I also wanted to attach a passenger side mirror, so I drilled a hole in the door and attached a nut which will support a factory style passenger mirror for my year. Meaning, instead of mickey mousing the job they could have done the same thing I did with a little bit of research and been able to attach a factory style mirror in the factory position on the door.

But oh well, what's done is done.

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I will have to apply some body filler to the ground down areas, which I have done. Although, I haven't sanded down the filler yet, so I haven't taken a picture.

 

So here she is at the moment! Fenders are off once more, and there are only a few more things to do on the body.

SgVrvFN.jpeg

 

The goal right now is to have her in the paint shop by the end of the month, and the work that needs to be done before that is:

1. Weld in radio slot patch (already have patch measured and cut)

2. Weld parts of door back in (had to be cut open to install mirror nut)

3. Remove mini-dent in bonnet (have all the tools needed)

4. Get an enclosed car trailer (it's raining a lot currently, and the car is bare metal. So our open trailer is a no-go)

 

So that's the story right now!

My next update will hopefully be a pictures of everything on the above list, and her in the paint shop.

 

Until then!

Milo

:drinks:

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