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Dive to put out fire?


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44 minutes ago, Spinnetto said:

It had an engine fire, so I throttled back and nosed down to put out the fire, but no change. Is this not modelled? Would be cool to have if not.

You‘d close the fuel cocks and keep throttle high. But we don‘t have fuel cocks in game (yet).

 

You can put out engine fires in FC aircraft: throttle down and dive straight down with full rudder. Sometimes flames go out.

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Try to avoid flying in front of the guns of allied fighters. Prevention is usually better than cure. I think your problems began earlier in the decision making chain.

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I did it two or three times with the Ju 88, but this was some time ago. So maybe it was changed meanwhile. But it could also depend on what exactly is burning (fuel or oil), and how big the hole is through which it evades.

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Definitely works, but haven't done on all planes (haven't even flown all planes yet). Once you get some speed in the dive go into side slip so the flames fan away from the fuselage. Can't remember where I heard that or if it makes a difference but I always do it.

 

Maybe you didn't have enough altitude? Last time was Ju 88 from about 3k or 4k up

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The first time I had fire in my Cockpit ( I fly in VR ONLY ) I was sooo scared and horrified, because it looks so damn real ( which is great ). I even did not think about to dive, I just wanted to get outside immediately, so I bailed out successfully. 

I don´t know if it would be a good idea in real to stay inside the plane and do dive maneuvers or spins if your feet are burning.

If the fire stays outside and you have enough altitude, the dive would be worth a try.

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It worked for me in my Sopwith Camel. It came as a surprise to me and in VR was a very interesting experience, as in not burning to death because the Air Ministry don’t issue us with a parachute! My letters to them on the matter have all gone unanswered. 😀

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Definitely works, but it's not always easy to pull off consistently. It's much harder in single-seaters as you need the flames to go away from you, not fan them faster into your face. It's saved me many times in twin-engines like the PE-2, 262, 110, 88 and Heinkel though.

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My impression of the WWII crates is that a lot of effort was made to prevent them from burning (let's not go there with early Japanese planes).  When the do start burning that means that all of those preventative measures have failed.  At that point a stiff cross breeze is probably not going to do it.

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21 hours ago, Vortice said:

Try to avoid flying in front of the guns of allied fighters. Prevention is usually better than cure. I think your problems began earlier in the decision making chain.

 

That's precisely the thinking of Japanese in early '40s about their aircraft. "Why haul all that armor around when you can simply avoid being shot at."

Edited by CrazyDuck
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Engine fires and wing root fires are extremely difficult to put out in dives, I don't think I've ever managed it.
Wing fires that are outside the the engines in a multi-engined aircraft I have managed to put out through a steep spiraling dive though, so it is possible.
Generally though, unless the fire is in that particular spot (and I have enough altitude), my immediate reaction to flames is generally to abandon ship.

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23 hours ago, Ram399 said:

Engine fires and wing root fires are extremely difficult to put out in dives, I don't think I've ever managed it.
Wing fires that are outside the the engines in a multi-engined aircraft I have managed to put out through a steep spiraling dive though, so it is possible.
Generally though, unless the fire is in that particular spot (and I have enough altitude), my immediate reaction to flames is generally to abandon ship.

 

This, size and spot make a huge impact on the extinguishability of a fire. An engine fire that starts below the cowling will hardly get enough air passing by to put it out. You're just "fanning the flames" in that case. An open fire on the wing is another thing, but again the size matters. Definitely put out fires in dives, but rarely do it now because if the fires don't extinguish you are above bailout speed and probably low altitude - rarely worth the risk of not being able to bail out anymore in case more goes wrong.

Edited by 216th_Jordan
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@  1:35 you can see a succsessful fire put off.

 

I was not flying that particular plane, so I dont know the actual procedure, but it looks like a oil cooling sistem fire, and the engine is obviously shut off, so the Fuel cock should be off, and the dive to flame out the fire.

 

Another danger of a fuel tank fire, is that it can sudenly explode, ending your virtual pilot carrer (and life)

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