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PatrickAWlson

Can anybody actually fly the He111 H6?

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OK, so it must be possible, but here are my issues after about 15 or 20 attempts:

1. No rudder authority on takeoff so you have to use brakes.  Pain in the butt, however, manageable.

2. Getting the plane off the ground without damaging the engines.  Managed that one time.

3. Retaining altitude without damaging engines.  Never managed that.  The thing is so under powered that even with a light load and 40% fuel the thing can't stay in the air without power.  Give it that power and the engines burnout in a matter of minutes.

4. Applies to any bomber -  actually bombing.

How do you fly and at the same time actually manage to do anything from the bomb sight view?  I guess fly autopilot and then set up the bomb sight well in advance?  Then spot the target, line up, level autopilot, open bomb bay doors, and release?  How do you spot your targets well enough in advance to do all of that?

 

Appreciate suggestions.  Sure that somebody else has the same questions.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, PatrickAWlson said:

How do you fly and at the same time actually manage to do anything from the bomb sight view?  I guess fly autopilot and then set up the bomb sight well in advance?  Then spot the target, line up, level autopilot, open bomb bay doors, and release?  How do you spot your targets well enough in advance to do all of that?

 

Appreciate suggestions.  Sure that somebody else has the same questions.

 

 


Short answer: direct your plane from the bomb sight while on autopilot by clicking on the "Turn Control" yoke or keys for "AI Autopilot: turn left/right". More details in the videos. Spotting can be tricky, but you usually have some idea where the target is and what are landmarks around. So if you don't see the actual target, you can line up with a landmark and then correct once you see the target better. For example, if you are going to bomb a bridge that appears to be near a tip of a forest of certain shape, line up with the tip of the forest which you can probably see from 50 km away and then correct later.
 


 

 

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If you are taking full fuel load, don't. It's just too much fuel/weight. For IL2 purposes half the load would be more than enough.

 

You will see how the takeoff and climb is much easier.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I think someone has done the maths and 10% fuel is enough to travel the entirity of the largest map in Il2, but I may be mis remembering.

I think full fuel is somewhere in excess of 4000L for a H6 - so assuming 0.8kg/litre, if you're taking off with 40%, thats 30% = 1200L = roughly a metric ton of fuel you dont need.

 

I typically take off with 7-8%, and then its fine to fly.

H16 has a more normal size fuel tank.

 

EDIT: flew the H6 last night, all my numbers are wrong. :)

 

 

 

Edited by -RS-Nolly
Correction

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I've calculated it out to where I take 4L per kilometer of flight. This get me home with a little over 100L reserve if I used the entire 30 mins of climb power which I usually don't. 

 

You really are making it seem hard. I got it off the ground my very first try, and that try was in MP. Haha. Missed the bomb drop but takeoff, flight, and landing was a breeze. My first time experience with it was nowhere near as horrendous as your description.

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4 hours ago, PatrickAWlson said:

OK, so it must be possible, but here are my issues after about 15 or 20 attempts:

1. No rudder authority on takeoff so you have to use brakes.  Pain in the butt, however, manageable.

2. Getting the plane off the ground without damaging the engines.  Managed that one time.

3. Retaining altitude without damaging engines.  Never managed that.  The thing is so under powered that even with a light load and 40% fuel the thing can't stay in the air without power.  Give it that power and the engines burnout in a matter of minutes.

4. Applies to any bomber -  actually bombing.

How do you fly and at the same time actually manage to do anything from the bomb sight view?  I guess fly autopilot and then set up the bomb sight well in advance?  Then spot the target, line up, level autopilot, open bomb bay doors, and release?  How do you spot your targets well enough in advance to do all of that?

 

Appreciate suggestions.  Sure that somebody else has the same questions.

 

 

 

1) Yep, you'll need to tap the brakes until you have rudder authority. It takes a while in both the Ju88 and the He111.

2) Fly the parameters for the engines and it should be fine. If you're taking a heavy bomb load you should taken a reduced fuel load to compensate. Some of the loadouts are overloads and will need long runways and careful engine management.

3) May be doing something wrong here with the engines. Although a slow climber, you should be able to get sufficient power to climb with normal fuel and bomb loads. Are you taking an overload with some of the heaviest and draggiest bombs?

4) Use the map and objectives to pre-brief on the target. Setup well in advance. Line up using the target itself or other markers (towns, rivers, forests, etc.) along the way. Bombs away at the appropriate release point as calculated with wind drift.

 

Level bombers are not good at hitting tactical targets so trying to plink a tank is unreasonable. Carpet bombing an industrial area or a concentration of troops or a bridge is more what they are capable of. This is something that requires practice and you'll need to do it a whole bunch to really get it down. Even then I don't hit all the time but if flown in a formation you're almost guaranteed that someone will hit if you saturate the target zone.

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2 hours ago, Jade_Monkey said:

If you are taking full fuel load, don't. It's just too much fuel/weight. For IL2 purposes half the load would be more than enough.

 

You will see how the takeoff and climb is much easier.

 

 

Even less is still far enough. I've yet to run out on 15% fuel load on any trip in career mode. ;) 

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Just adding to what others said:

 

- going too steep after takeoff? (Too slow -> more drag)

- flaps on TO? Put them in on climbout

 

There is really a ton of things that one could do wrong.. Best thing of course would be a short video. :)

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6 hours ago, II./SG.1-MarkWilhelmsson said:

 

You really are making it seem hard. I got it off the ground my very first try, and that try was in MP. Haha. Missed the bomb drop but takeoff, flight, and landing was a breeze. My first time experience with it was nowhere near as horrendous as your description.

 

Cool story, but Pat is right that the Heinkel is a massive dog that can't carry half its fuel load without having a stroke. 

 

 

 

 

 

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As others pointed out, at the beginning don't take too much fuel. And for the H6 don't look too much on the percentage, because it can take a huge amount of fuel with the additional fuel tank in the bomb bay, so look more for the liters. Someone, who knows what he is doing can of course take off with max fuel and 1500kg (1x SC500 + 4x SC 250) bombs, as long as he is not on one of the short runways.

For takeoff you can throttle up with your feet on the brakes and stop braking once you have max power, which will give you a bit better rudder authority, but you might need a little toe braking, too. After you left mother earth, lift the gear, then throttle back to max climb power (1.25 ATA, 2400RPM) and when you have a bit of altitude retract flaps. Get a bit speed before you start climbing and don't climb to steep or you will lose your speed again, because of the not too powerful engines. Watch your temperatures and open/close your water and oil radiator flaps according to your temperatures. One important thing to mention, don't forget to open your oil radiator flaps after you started your engines/before taking off.

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I'm assuming that in real life, the He111 could take off with a full bomb load and full fuel... you would think that in game the plane should be able to do that, regardless of the size of the map and whether it needed full fuel or not.

Someone please fill me in as to why it can't in game.

 

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24 minutes ago, Trooper117 said:

I'm assuming that in real life, the He111 could take off with a full bomb load and full fuel... you would think that in game the plane should be able to do that, regardless of the size of the map and whether it needed full fuel or not.

Someone please fill me in as to why it can't in game.

 

 

Maybe...possible they could have designed in more fuel capacity than they could lift at max zero-fuel weight for longer range with less payload (was also an airliner, right?), but even so it seems pretty canine 🤣

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You do know oilcoolers get other assignments in the HE 111 

I fly it without any problems. I stopped use my rudderpedal brakes and use brake button and rudder pedals in order to steer. 
I hold it on 1,3 ata and 2400 rpm in over 30 minutes without a problem

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2 hours ago, Trooper117 said:

I'm assuming that in real life, the He111 could take off with a full bomb load and full fuel

 

This is a big assumption. It's entirely possible for a plane to be designed to not be able to carry the full bomb load when carrying full fuel. It makes sense as a design compromise when you don't have powerful enough engines. Give the plane the ability to go farther with a reduced loadout, or carry a bigger loadout over a shorter range, rather than limit your operational flexibility by mandating the plane must be able to take off with full fuel and max bombs.

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8 minutes ago, RedKestrel said:
2 hours ago, Trooper117 said:

I'm assuming that in real life, the He111 could take off with a full bomb load and full fuel

 

This is a big assumption. It's entirely possible for a plane to be designed to not be able to carry the full bomb load when carrying full fuel. It makes sense as a design compromise when you don't have powerful enough engines. Give the plane the ability to go farther with a reduced loadout, or carry a bigger loadout over a shorter range, rather than limit your operational flexibility by mandating the plane must be able to take off with full fuel and max bombs.

Don't forget the H6 has an additional interior fuel tank, which other 111 versions did not have. Without the interiot tank it certainly was able to take off with full fuel and max bombload, but the bombload surely had to be reduced, when using the additional fuel for larger range.

2 hours ago, MattS said:

Maybe...possible they could have designed in more fuel capacity than they could lift at max zero-fuel weight for longer range with less payload (was also an airliner, right?),

Yes, but as an airliner it surely didn't have a large fuel tank in the middle of its fuselage (left bombbay);)

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21 minutes ago, Yogiflight said:

 

Yes, but as an airliner it surely didn't have a large fuel tank in the middle of its fuselage (left bombbay);)

 

LOL bro I would not want to be sitting next to that.

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Being a dedicated bomber pilot and having a lot of hours on both Heinkel variants I think I can share some tips:
 

14 hours ago, PatrickAWlson said:

1. No rudder authority on takeoff so you have to use brakes.  Pain in the butt, however, manageable.

2. Getting the plane off the ground without damaging the engines.  Managed that one time.

3. Retaining altitude without damaging engines.  Never managed that.  The thing is so under powered that even with a light load and 40% fuel the thing can't stay in the air without power.  Give it that power and the engines burnout in a matter of minutes.

4. Applies to any bomber -  actually bombing.

How do you fly and at the same time actually manage to do anything from the bomb sight view?  I guess fly autopilot and then set up the bomb sight well in advance?  Then spot the target, line up, level autopilot, open bomb bay doors, and release?  How do you spot your targets well enough in advance to do all of that?


1. Do not overuse brakes! Sure, at the initial phase of the take off run, few quick brake inputs are necessary to keep it going straight as Heinkel has low rudder effectiveness at low speeds (rudder needs some airflow to work properly, on the ground that airflow is provided mainly by propwash, but your vertical stabilizer is not placed directly in the stream, instead it is placed between two engines, which reduces effective airflow a bit). 
However as soon as you gain some forward speed try to use only rudder whenever possible, because every single brake input costs you some speed which may cause problem #2.
2. As some people have already said - take less fuel. H-6 is modeled as a long range variant with enormous fuel tanks. It is entirely possible to lift it off the ground with full fuel and those two huge SC1800 bombs, but you will never ever need that. H-6 burns around 600 liters of fuel per hour of flight on nominal engine settings at sea level, take that into account while determining your fuel load. Huge bombs are rarely best option too. Now for the take off technique. Remember to apply flaps, around 20-40% will do fine (more for heavy loads and short runways). Try to keep it going straight so you don't bleed speed. You have a full minute of take-off rating so make use of that during the take off run. Heinkel accelerates slowly, but it doesn't need much speed to lift off. Once you are in the air, take it slow. Retract your gear quickly to reduce drag, and keep the climb angle as low as possible (don't crash into ground obstacles though 😄 , in order to gain some speed. Gently reduce engine power to climb regime to not blow it up. Then retract the flaps, but do it slowly, giving it time to accelerate, so increasing airspeed can compensate for reduced lift coefficient. Once you have 250 kph IAS and fully retracted flaps and gear, start climbing. Remember, Heinkel is an easy, gentle plane and you have to handle it that way.
3. Cruising on nominal power requires airspeed. There are two kind of planes: those "flying on wings" and those "flying on engines". Heinkel is of the first kind - it does not have a lot of power for it's weight, but it has a lot of wing surface to fly on. Wings need airspeed to create lift though, so in order to let them keep you in the sky, you need to keep some airspeed for them. You do not have much engine power though, so you have to keep the precious speed you gained, think about it like flying in a huge glider with the engines being just an extra asset. Main mistake people make with the Heinkel is giving it too much of pitch up input, when it doesn't climb/keep altitude. Wrong! It starts to climb only for few seconds, and then bleeds rest of the airspeed, to the point when it stalls and starts falling down. If you cannot hold your current altitude, don't try it too hard. Pitch down a little, let it accelerate, even at cost of some altitude, and then climb back, at higher speed. Unless you want to fly really high, like 5km+, 250kph is a good orientation mark. If you are going slower, prioritize acceleration over climbing/holding altitude.
4. Accurate bombing requires using auto level hold (default shift+A). Once you climb to altitude and get on heading to target, turn auto leveling on and switch to bombardier sight. You can still make minor course adjustments using one of the knobs (or shift+x,shift+z keys) in order to aim the plane exactly where you want. It is good practice to prepare your bombing approach in advance,  plan the heading to target, calculate the wind, estimate the speed you will have on the final run, so you can preset the bombsight. Then you have time to focus on looking for landmarks in order to spot the target early, so again gives you time to properly line up, make accurate aiming corrections and do some final adjustments to bombsight. It comes with practice though. Once you get some experience you will do all these things really quickly and without much thinking.

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Trooper117 said:

I'm assuming that in real life, the He111 could take off with a full bomb load and full fuel... you would think that in game the plane should be able to do that, regardless of the size of the map and whether it needed full fuel or not.

Someone please fill me in as to why it can't in game.

 


The He 111 H-6 we have in game is a long ranged variant, one of the bomb bays is replaced by a big fuel tank, carrying 835 liters of extra fuel.  The H-16 in Battle of Kuban has the standard configuration (that's why it can fit double the bombs internally).

This makes the H-6 heavier so with full fuel with the extra fuel tank it can carry less bombload without exceeding the max take off weight.

According to the in game stats, standard weight is 13723 Kg, this is with full fuel and I think the included 16 x 50 Kg bombs in the standard loadout. So the weight with full fuel but without bombs would be 12923 Kg.  Max take off weight is listed as 15239 Kg, this would leave the He 111 H-6 with full fuel only able to load 2300 Kg of bombs without exceeding max take off weight. The He 111 H-16 with full fuel can indeed take the 3500 Kg max bombload while keeping itself more or less at the max take off weight limit.

Now I don't know what's the parameter considered for max take off weight, I guess it's based on runway lenght needed to take off. Maybe the smaller runways on the Eastern Front can't even hold that. But at least in the longer runways of the Rheinland map I can take off at the max take off weight.

Other than that, you don't need nowhere near full fuel for the missions we can do in these maps.

At the climb power of 1.25 ata 2400 RPM both engines consume 680 liters per hour, and in continuous mode  600 liters per hour.

Assuming 30 minutes of climb to altitude, then 2 hours at continuous (travel the whole map and back again) you need a total of 1540 liters of fuel, this is 36% of fuel load in the H-6.

Edited by -=PHX=-SuperEtendard
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I do not have much experience in flying the Heinkel, and initially I also had problems to get it in the air.

I think, that my mistake has been a too steep climb angle (as =/Hospiz/=Metalhead has poited out).

However, one thing that helped me is keeping the flaps in in the beginning and only extending them towards the end of the runway. This helps to increase initial acceleration.

 

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I fly he 111 with 25% fuel.  No more , why take more weight. I haven’t seen a target further away than this load 

You want to climb in that plane

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1 hour ago, Hermod said:

I do not have much experience in flying the Heinkel, and initially I also had problems to get it in the air.

I think, that my mistake has been a too steep climb angle (as =/Hospiz/=Metalhead has poited out).

However, one thing that helped me is keeping the flaps in in the beginning and only extending them towards the end of the runway. This helps to increase initial acceleration.

 

I do the same, It's an old bush flying STOL trick.  Dump the flaps out and haul back!

 

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23 hours ago, MattS said:

 

Cool story, but Pat is right that the Heinkel is a massive dog that can't carry half its fuel load without having a stroke. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you insinuating that I'm telling a lie?

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13 hours ago, -=PHX=-SuperEtendard said:

Assuming 30 minutes of climb to altitude, then 2 hours at continuous (travel the whole map and back again)

As I said I spend 30 minutes climbing. Depended on where the airbase is I do it closing in to initial point. And from IP to target it is never more than 30 minutes. Even on long round trip. I spend about max 10 minutes from climb finished to IP 

return not the stright line to base is max 30 minute. 
so 25 % fuel is enough even with a few holes in the tank. Why people insist taking even half tank is beyond my comprehension

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25 minutes ago, II./SG.1-MarkWilhelmsson said:

 

Are you insinuating that I'm telling a lie?

 

No, I'm saying that your opinion of the level of difficulty of flying the Heinkel has no bearing on how badly underpowered it is.

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11 hours ago, =[TIA]=Stoopy said:

 

I do the same, It's an old bush flying STOL trick.  Dump the flaps out and haul back!

 


When it comes to STOL tricks:
Hold the brakes until engines achieve full RPM, then release, it saves few precious meters of runway.
 

 

13 hours ago, Hermod said:

I do not have much experience in flying the Heinkel, and initially I also had problems to get it in the air.

I think, that my mistake has been a too steep climb angle (as =/Hospiz/=Metalhead has poited out).

However, one thing that helped me is keeping the flaps in in the beginning and only extending them towards the end of the runway. This helps to increase initial acceleration.

 


Steep climb angle combined with low speed kills. There is a performance segment in every aircraft, called second regime. It is speed range between stall speed and minimum drag speed (without going too much into aerodynamics: drag increases below that speed because of component called induced drag, which increases at high angle of attack). During take off, landing approach and during a steep climb, you fly in that regime. It's a bit simplified, but you actually need more power to keep lower speed without stalling. What you should remember, is that plane behaves different while flying in that regime. During normal flight, you control speed by controlling engine power and control altitude using your elevator. In the second speed regime you do exactly opposite: engine power controls your climb/descent rate, while elevator input controls your speed by changing angle of attack. It's counter-intuitive at first glance, but once learned and understood, it improves your flying quite a lot.

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1 hour ago, =/Hospiz/=Metalhead said:

 you actually need more power

 

And that's when the Heinkel is like... 🤣

 

imma-stop-you-right-there.jpg.f47dae189784478b8c38c88279ac97e3.jpg

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Another thing that can help gain speed except for dropping flaps only shortly before rotation is pushing the tail up on takeoff roll with elevators to decrease both induced and parasitic drag.

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4 hours ago, 216th_Jordan said:

Another thing that can help gain speed except for dropping flaps only shortly before rotation is pushing the tail up on takeoff roll with elevators to decrease both induced and parasitic drag.


Which also improves airflow around vertical stabilizer, increasing rudder effectiveness, and that reduces the need to use brakes for directional control, resulting in better acceleration.

 

5 hours ago, MattS said:

 

And that's when the Heinkel is like... 🤣

 

imma-stop-you-right-there.jpg.f47dae189784478b8c38c88279ac97e3.jpg


To be honest, He-111 has a lot of power. Nearly the same power as Ju-88 with about 300 kg more of basic empty mass. It is heavier when loaded, because it carries more load (mainly fuel load though) and has nearly two tons higher maximum take off mass. In return it has almost 60% higher wing surface, and this is why it handles so differently. Differently does not mean worse, it means you just need to take different approach to fly it. 

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@ChattyTumbler should be able to help, he is a bomber pilot.

 

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Thanks for all of the tips.  Most of these were things that I knew in general but not in detail.  Especially the fuel load.  

 

I still have problems because I am mostly used to fighters.  There, the problem is controlling the excess power.  At least you have rudder authority right from the start.  I guess it makes sense given that the engines are out on the wings and the stabilizer is on the fuselage.  In fighters (even the 110) the rudders are right in the prop wash.

 

Tapping the brakes on takeoff takes practice but I have managed it successfully several times.  What I have not managed is flying it without burning out the engines.  So if I keep weight low, get it off the ground without causing engine damage, and then really watch the climb pitch to avoid needing lots of power I should be good.  Also remember to open the oil rads.  

 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/9/2020 at 1:19 AM, PatrickAWlson said:

OK, so it must be possible, but here are my issues after about 15 or 20 attempts:

1. No rudder authority on takeoff so you have to use brakes.  Pain in the butt, however, manageable.

2. Getting the plane off the ground without damaging the engines.  Managed that one time.

3. Retaining altitude without damaging engines.  Never managed that.  The thing is so under powered that even with a light load and 40% fuel the thing can't stay in the air without power.  Give it that power and the engines burnout in a matter of minutes.

4. Applies to any bomber -  actually bombing.

How do you fly and at the same time actually manage to do anything from the bomb sight view?  I guess fly autopilot and then set up the bomb sight well in advance?  Then spot the target, line up, level autopilot, open bomb bay doors, and release?  How do you spot your targets well enough in advance to do all of that?

 

Appreciate suggestions.  Sure that somebody else has the same questions.

 

 

Hi Patrick,

 

Most of your questions have been answered I think but here's my tuppence worth :)

 

1. Yes, tapping the brakes until you build up speed is the only way to steer this beast to start with. Use the turn and slip indicator to predict what is going to happen rather than looking out of the window. You can also take-off by sitting in the front gunner position but that is quite scary!

2. For take off I use 100% oil and water radiators and 100% throttle and RPM. Don’t forget to change the pitch to around -50%, it makes a huge difference! I rarely carry more than 900 litres of fuel and that gives me a flight time of about 50 minutes. I don't use flaps, even with 2x1800kg bombs. If the air temperature is high or you are using a short runway then line up just off the runway for a few extra feet and power up to 50% with both brakes on - release the brakes just as the plane starts to move of its own accord. If you get neat the end of the runway and its looking bad then drop about 10% flap just at the end. Lowering flaps early actually causes drag.

3. After you are airborne and flown level for a few seconds use 92% throttle and 86% RPM and you'll be good for 30 minutes of climbing (aim to maintain around 220-230kmh). Use the tiny 'mission clock' below your main clock to make sure you don't go over 25 minutes at this setting. Once comfortable at altitude drop to 77/77 rpm/throttle. The engines will surgge as you pass 3000m when the supercharger switches over, climbing 2600-3000m will be quite painful but better once you pass it.

4. Set your bombing computer while you are still on the ground waiting for your engines. This means planning the route in advance. saves a lot of bother later on. For spotting targets makes sure you flick between bomb view and the map with your bombsight set 'fully up' at about 75 degreees ahead. If you tick the graphics setting 'long range buildings' or something like that you'll see the target area render in very early ie from 30-40km away as dark patches.

 

Hope it helps

Edited by I/KG1_Chattytumbler
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Posted (edited)
On 6/9/2020 at 2:19 AM, PatrickAWlson said:

OK, so it must be possible, but here are my issues after about 15 or 20 attempts:

1. No rudder authority on takeoff so you have to use brakes.  Pain in the butt, however, manageable.

2. Getting the plane off the ground without damaging the engines.  Managed that one time.

3. Retaining altitude without damaging engines.  Never managed that.  The thing is so under powered that even with a light load and 40% fuel the thing can't stay in the air without power.  Give it that power and the engines burnout in a matter of minutes.

4. Applies to any bomber -  actually bombing.

How do you fly and at the same time actually manage to do anything from the bomb sight view?  I guess fly autopilot and then set up the bomb sight well in advance?  Then spot the target, line up, level autopilot, open bomb bay doors, and release?  How do you spot your targets well enough in advance to do all of that?

 

Appreciate suggestions.  Sure that somebody else has the same questions.

 

 

 

Been using the He111 with LizLemon's torpedo mod quite a bit lately

 

1. I have a modded warthog with a modded hardware switch i use for yaw. Tip it shortly and occasionally LR before she starts tolling. Same with Ju52 BTW.

Never tried the brakes trick alas. Pull the stick back maybe during take off untill speed is around 50 km/h?

2. don't overdue engine power once she moves, and keep her rolling, don't stop.

3. I cheat on that one with some automated engine settings.

4. Bomb sight: never hit any thing, but i tried that mostly with an A20 however. I'll try the tips above, but i never really got into the matter, usually i bomb skipping with arcade view, and the little circle.

This doesn't work with torpedoes however. You'll have to wing that with speed, drop distance and height, why it's so much more game-fun.

Edited by jollyjack

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On 6/9/2020 at 2:19 AM, PatrickAWlson said:

3. Retaining altitude without damaging engines.  Never managed that.  The thing is so under powered that even with a light load and 40% fuel the thing can't stay in the air without power.  Give it that power and the engines burnout in a matter of minutes.

That is not a Small amount of Fuel. That is still a very respectable amount of Fuel that lasts for several Hours.

 

 

 

Apparently this whole thing was relevant at some Point before.

 

 

 

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Compared to the Gotha in RoF the Heinkel is a treat to fly.

 

Many good points have been made so I'll skip the general suggestions and expand on what I find usefull:

 

1. The engine can only sustain takeoff power for 1 min. Its best used to clomb till 200 m above GL and than reduce power back to climb power. That way you can avoid damaging your engines and utilize max power for safe takeoff.

 

2. Flaps do increase drag but that is no reason not to use them. Instead, accelerate the aircraft without flaps and extend them upon reaching takeoff speed (~180km/h). Depending on load, 20 - 25 ° should be used.

 

Also ypu should leave flaps out until reaching a safety altitude of 200 AGL atleast and retract them gradually instead of instantly to allow the aircraft to pick up speed and compensate lift loss.

 

3. When slow rudder does only help in combination with a blast of throttle. Give your engines some revs fpr a second and hit rudder hard untill you notice the momentum catching up with your change of direction. Never stay on rudder for long put rather apply it in short, hard tabs.

 

Still brakes are nessecary to corner or to prevent a breackout.

 

4. Don't be afraid to go slow. The Heinkel will even climb at 220 km/h which is usefull when you have to clear large obstacles (like nasty trees). Once cleared you should increase your airspeed to improve climb performence and cooling.

 

5. The bomb sight works like in RoF in that upon emtering the bombsight view the aircraft is put into autolevel. Than direction can be adjusted with the autolevel turn keys to perform gentle aileroun turns. It is always adviseable to setup your bombsight before heading over the target to save time (altitude, speed and wind angle adjustment should be part of the flight plan). The englaced nose makes it perfect for spotting targets in the front gunner seat.

 

6. The Heinkel is an aircraft with manual permitted overloads for certain conditions such as exessive long asphalt runways. Ingame its not sensible to fly it in that condition which can be easily avoided by not chosing full fuel and/or the SC1800. 

 

7. Warm weather is your enemy. When flying in summer conditions adjust for an imcrease of your takeoff run even if it means rolling off the runway.

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Posted (edited)

I've never taken off in the He-111 H6, so when I saw this thread, I thought it might be a challenge.

 

My difficulty settings in the game are full realism in terms of physics. I only cheat by selecting no gun misfires, yes to warmed up engine, and auto engine management. I know the last point is probably a big deal to realists, but I only care about the piloting part of flying, not the mechanic aspect of it (I know all true pilots must essentially be fliers and mechanics if they expect to live long).

 

Anyway, that part explained, I took off in the winter with a 25% fuel load, 1000kg bomb load, and a 20mm gun in the nose instead of the usual gun. The takeoff was extremely easy. I climbed to 1600 feet and set the throttle to 70%, whereupon the plane pretty much flew itself (without autolevelling). I hit 212 MPH.

 

My flight equipment is a cheap old stick with a twist rudder and built-in throttle.

 

Given all that, I must assume the OP's problems are engine management related, since that's the only thing I cheat on.

 

*edit: I want to specify the engine management is the only engine cheat I use. All other boxes in the column are unchecked.

Edited by oc2209

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On 6/9/2020 at 1:03 PM, Trooper117 said:

I'm assuming that in real life, the He111 could take off with a full bomb load and full fuel...

Absolutely not. Most bombers and transport aircraft face tradeoff in range and load.

 

The max. takeoff weight is stated in the aircrafts manual. Just because you can put way more weight in the aircraft does not clear it for flight when you feel goofy enough to do so.

 

Max. t/o weight also depends on the density altitude. Just because there‘s hangers for X bombs and space for Y fuel doesn‘t mean you can put in all of that. Only drastically overpowered aircraft could tolerate such. Bombers are none of such.

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It was not unheard of for B-29s to crash on takeoff in the pacific due to being overloaded with fuel and bombs on raids to Japan

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Guess why LeMay had all but the tail guns removed on B29s after learning about the Japaneses true defense capabilities.

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