Jump to content
dukethejuke

Where can I get info on the right use of pitch trim

Recommended Posts

What I am talking about is that I notice that at certain times  i.e. combat and landings I see the use of pitch trim. I know about when in flight , slow climb of level out. just trying to learn for better experience. Thank you so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not the car analogy again :wacko: 

 

Anyway, the question was not about propeller pitch but elevator trim.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best I can figure for the Russian planes is that it's a matter of "feel" depending on what the plane is doing and the speed you are going.  I usually set the pitch trimmer to 0%/neutral for take off and landing and adjust it from there.  IDK if the German planes have actual "in the operator's manual" settings for speed/altitude states for the stabilizer system they use.  

 

When level-cruising or in a slight climb, I usually try to trim the plane to sustain as long a period of "hands free" flight as the plane will allow and still stay on-course. Obviously, this changes with wind and weather conditions.  

 

Keep in mind that, for some reason, all planes with trim controls in-game spawn in on the ground with the trim set for best cruising/max cruising speed instead of takeoff trim or neutral settings.  It's not that big of a problem, if you get used to it but, you might be better off setting the pitch trim to 0% before taking off.  It really helps with the Pe-2 at least.  I can maintain a 300kph mostly-hands-free climb to nearly it's service ceiling by making that little change.  

Some planes that spawn in like the P-51 and Spitfire are default set for cruise, which is nose-heavy.  Nose-heavy is apparently not something you would want to be trimmed for in either of (or any of) these planes during takeoff. Even if 0%/neutral pitch setting is not correct for either plane, it's at least a lot farther away from the default "prepare to dig a ditch" setting.  Granted, once you get "trained" to the feel of taking off trimmed nose-heavy, you probably won't think much of it but, it is technically "wrong".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trim usage can be summarised by:

"Trim to relieve control pressure."

Whatever it takes is whatever it takes.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trim controls the angle of attack of the wing but for our purposes you could say it controls the speed that the plane wants to fly hands off. Sort of like a cruise control.

 

More power and you'll climb at the speed your trim is set, less power and you'll descend at that speed, just right and you fly level.  (in general.... there are lots of oscillations and a fighter isn't designed to be as stable as passenger planes so in practice it'll never really hold an exact speed)

When landing you want precise speed control so you trim for your approach speed and control the touchdown point with throttle,  It lightens the pilot workload on landing and you run off the end of the runway less. Certainly planes will climb to altitude faster at their best climb speed and glide farther at their glide speed

In flight mostly you're just trimming for light stick forces (unless you want to fly at a certain speed to stay with other planes or to make a rendezvous).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some planes are heap easier to pull out of a high speed dive with some (or a lot of) nose-up trim.

 

I've heard violent arguments about whether nose-up or nose-down trim is a good thing in a ground attacker.   I in my noobness like to trim enough nose-down so that by the end of my attack dive (shallow dive, not dive bombing) I'm neutral or still slightly nose down but there are other opinions.  The one thing I don't like is having the plane cross over the neutral trim zone towards the end of the attack run, having the joystick sitting in its centre detent and/or deadzones it makes aiming less precise right when you need it to be most precise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/30/2020 at 8:21 PM, Requiem said:

Trim usage can be summarised by:

"Trim to relieve control pressure."

Whatever it takes is whatever it takes.

 

"If it feels good, do it." 🤣

 

@dukethejuke I do tend to trim a little nose-heavy when attacking/shooting just to have a consistent stick force to pull against. Hard to describe but seems to offer finer control with my joystick!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It is just a convenience for gentle climbs etc.   You could just as easily keep holding the stick at the required angle but trimming makes your life easier.   It does have an advantage when flying in formation because you can never hold the stick perfectly still in one position and every time you move your elevator you are causing drag so it can make it harder to stay with your leader.   When diving on a target, if you have to hold the nose down strongly to maintain the dive angle then it badly affects your aim so trimming off at least some of that stick pressure helps.

Edited by 56RAF_Roblex
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For combat I tend to set it slightly nose heavy as when you speed up or add power from a neutral trim state you will end up nose light. This leaves you having to hold forward stick pressure when aiming which as Roblex said above tends to put your aim off. Whereas I don't find it an issue if I need to pull back on the stick when aiming.

 

Everyone has their own feel for whats right for them and this may or may not be of help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...