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How to tell ATA/boost without techno chat.

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Hey guys, so I turned off the techno chat to learn how to operate without it. There's a problem however, normally one can tell by the ATA wheter you're in combat or emergency setting. But if remember correctly the shown ATA will drop once you're up high. Now with no technochat it's just guessing work on whether emergency is on or not. Sometimes you can tell by the engine sound but it's by no means guaranteed.

 

How does this work? Does the ATA show correctly until Full throttle/critical height and starts dropping afterwards? And if so, should the emergency limits be higher after FTH if the emergency doesn't add much power after that and presumably engine is under less stress as it develops less HP up there? If that's the case then wouldn't need to worry to keep track of it after reaching FTH and still could operate ATA by sight under FTH.

 

Let me know if I'm getting this right or wrong. Thanks in advance!

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Engine Power Drops as altitude increases, as air becomes less dense. Hence why ATA drops for a given throttle position.

Some aircraft have staged super-charger and will see the ATA jump back up at a set altitude when the supercharger engages. 

 

Please correct me if I am wrong: the Limits of engine regime (combat,continuous) are actualy engine POWER limits. And thus as the power drops with alt. the limits don't change. So nothing changes, you still don't exceed the same limits as on the sea-level. 

 

Which might mean that in some cases. when at high alt, you can stay forever at 100% throttle. As not enough Atm pressure is available for the engine to produce more power than the limit.

 

 

 

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In Bf109 and Fw190 with RPM linked to throttle you need to fly by RPM instead of manifold pressure. Increasing throttle would also increase RPM and thus you would exceed the RPM engine limitations (which is obviously not a good idea).

 

In aircraft with manual RPM control (= constant speed propeller) you can increase throttle above FTH.

 

 

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Don't be too concerned about flying at the maximum limit.

Have a gentle cruise speed. In combat use all the power you need, but not more.

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3 hours ago, 41Sqn_Skipper said:

In Bf109 and Fw190 with RPM linked to throttle you need to fly by RPM instead of manifold pressure. Increasing throttle would also increase RPM and thus you would exceed the RPM engine limitations (which is obviously not a good idea).

 

In aircraft with manual RPM control (= constant speed propeller) you can increase throttle above FTH.

 

 

 

Ah yes ok that makes sense. A little bit tougher to follow though,  as the RPM change isn't instantaneous, whereas ATA changes almost straight away and stays there.  Still I seem to remember for instance in il2 Blitz certain higher RPM's were allowed for longer duraiton in the 109-E3/E4 above 6000m. This apparently was historical behaviour. Are IL2 GB limits the same across all altitudes?

 

Furthermore, where could one find the Full throttle height for all planes/engines? I have a feeling it might be the 2nd level speed value in the tech description here...

 

... but i'm not entirely sure. For instance for the G-4 It says 7000 meters? Every plane has different speed @ altitude listed. Devs must have picked them for a reason right? Otherwise it would make sense for all of them to be listed at the same height, e.g. SL,3000,6000.

 

2 hours ago, [DBS]Browning said:

Don't be too concerned about flying at the maximum limit.

Have a gentle cruise speed. In combat use all the power you need, but not more.

 

Yes that's all well and good, until you blow your engine in the 109. Which is quite easily done when I use all the power I need when I need it - e.g. fast climb. Easier to prevent that if a red light comes on in technochat. With no technochat you need to be extra careful so I'm trying to find the best way to do it and where & when I can/cannot push the envelope

 

It's just a consequence of the game's strict engine limit. I understand it has to be there. Of course in RL there were no emergency lights coming on when pushing the engine past the redline. But you also didn't risk catastrophic engine failure if you flew emergency say for 90 seconds. It simply reduced engine life at a much increased rate. Now with no warning and a strict limit in place it can be challenging to not exceed limits in the midst of combat.

 

Of course much less of a problem for later planes where limits are 3 to 10 minutes but with earlier ones I'd like to play it safe as the margin for failure is small.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, hnbdgr said:

 

Edited by Tipsi

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3 hours ago, [301]luckyhendrix said:

Engine Power Drops as altitude increases, as air becomes less dense. Hence why ATA drops for a given throttle position.

Some aircraft have staged super-charger and will see the ATA jump back up at a set altitude when the supercharger engages. 

 

Please correct me if I am wrong: the Limits of engine regime (combat,continuous) are actualy engine POWER limits. And thus as the power drops with alt. the limits don't change. So nothing changes, you still don't exceed the same limits as on the sea-level. 

 

Which might mean that in some cases. when at high alt, you can stay forever at 100% throttle. As not enough Atm pressure is available for the engine to produce more power than the limit.

 

 

 

 

I'm not sure tbh.  In my mind Power (HP) is a function of the Engine. The engine takes fuel & air( note: of different density at different altitude) and processes it (if you like) at certain RPM.

 

But it's true that limits were given both in RPM and ATA see here:

me109e-enginelimits.jpg

 

So my question would be do the game engine limits only consider RPM or both RPM/ATA? Because if it's the latter the engine ought to last longer in emergency above FTH.

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi mate, 

 

I don’t know if this is the correct answer or the discussion you’re looking for but:


using the 109G4 as an example, it can fly on combat power (1.3ATA) for 30 minutes (about the average time of one sortie). It can also be boosted (1.42ATA) for 1min if I recall.

 

Without the techno chat I would keep a good eye on my ATA and think “right, any ATA below 1.3 and I’m all good.”

 

I’d also be thinking.. “Right, full throttle = 100% = 1.42ATA, use it sparingly”

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Posted (edited)

When I fly high, Im monitoring my RPM instead of ATA.

Edited by Voidhunger

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5 minutes ago, Tipsi said:

Hi mate, 

 

I don’t know if this is the correct answer or the discussion you’re looking for but:


using the 109G4 as an example, it can fly on combat power (1.3ATA) for 30 minutes (about the average time of one sortie). It can also be boosted (1.42ATA) for 1min if I recall.

 

Without the techno chat I would keep a good eye on my ATA and think “right, any ATA below 1.3 and I’m all good.”

 

I’d also be thinking.. “Right, full throttle = 100% = 1.42ATA, use it sparingly”

 

Thanks, yes that's what I'm doing too normally. But higher up say at 7,000m a throttle position of 100% will not give you full ATA.

 

In the 109 F-4 at 7,000 meters, ATA reads 1.09 @ 2700RPM

In the 109 G-4 at 7,000 meters, ATA reads 1.29 @ 2800RPM

 

Both on autumn map, not sure if time of year and air density has any effect on ATA at altitude, probably.

1 minute ago, Voidhunger said:

When I fly high, Im monitoring my RPM instead off ATA.

 

Thanks. Yes as 41Sqn_Skipper  indicated as well,  that seems to be the way to do it. My question then is - why do actual plane manuals say the limit is to be observed at RPM/ATA combination not just RPM.

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In Erich Brunote interview I think he said that he only flew  by the ATA.

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In German planes, if you get used to focusing more on RPM instead of ATA you will find altitude changes less of a concern for engine management. It is especially important in the 190 in mid altitudes when the plane is yet to switch supercharger gear, and also at higher altitudes in the 109. Additionally, switching between mid to later war planes also becomes simpler, as the RPM usually was similar for normal/combat/emergency (everything later than the F2).

 

I have been flying without Technochat for the most part of the last 3.5 years.

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3 hours ago, Voidhunger said:

In Erich Brunote interview I think he said that he only flew  by the ATA.

Yes, I remember that, too and it is what I am doing until we reach the altitudes in which the manifold pressure gets less, then I switch over to view the RPMs.

In the 190, however, you get into trouble, with the pressure hole between 2-3K, so its better to stay with RPM all the time.

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Posted (edited)

I fly by ATA, never had a problem. Take the 109k4 to 9km. Push the throttle to the emergency setting. Since the ATA at that height is around 1.4 something, you will not break the engine in 10 minutes, basically you are in the 30 minutes range, although RPM is at the maximum available.

 

For a shorter test, take the 109G6 at 9k. ATA will be around 1.05 if you push the throttle to the max. RPM will be at the maximum setting of 2800. The engine will not break after 1-2 minutes, it breaks after around 3.5 minutes.

 

So, ATA is considered by the timers, to some extent, it's not just the RPM. Lower ATA will allow you to use the max throttle setting for a longer time. I think it's safe to use ATA.

Edited by Raven109

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4 hours ago, Voidhunger said:

In Erich Brunote interview I think he said that he only flew  by the ATA.

 

Which is wrong for the Dora. The Dora is flown by RPM exclusively.

Brunotte never got *trained* on the Dora. They'd just got the airplanes and flew them without any kind of transition-training.

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Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, Bremspropeller said:

 

Which is wrong for the Dora. The Dora is flown by RPM exclusively.

Brunotte never got *trained* on the Dora. They'd just got the airplanes and flew them without any kind of transition-training.

 

Can you provide some sources to go with that statement, which show that the Jumo should be flown by using RPM and the DB by using ATA? Both are internal combustion engines, I can't see why you'd fly one by looking at RPM more than the other. Wear and tear can only be determined on the ground by looking at the oil filter (that would be the simple test).

Edited by Raven109

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D9 absolutely fly by rpm and not ata.

 

https://youtu.be/US2uktcxolQ
 

as had been said the pilot manual didn’t make it to the pilots and they use ata as reference, but it is suppose to be rpm as this video explains very well why.

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Posted (edited)

Yes, the manual was not sent to the pilots, but even when they flew by using ATA they still could fly the D9 without having any issues. Both ATA and RPM are important when using the engine, you cannot use just one at the expense of the other. But reducing ATA while keeping RPM constant will reduce overall engine temperature/engine knocking chance, and will allow you to run the engine at the same RPM for longer, of course at a reduced output power setting.

 

What I find interesting is that the 109k4 has the RPM gauge placed higher up than the ATA gauge on the dashboard, which could possibly indicate that the RPM gauge suddenly became more important.

7 hours ago, hnbdgr said:

 

I'm not sure tbh.  In my mind Power (HP) is a function of the Engine. The engine takes fuel & air( note: of different density at different altitude) and processes it (if you like) at certain RPM.

 

But it's true that limits were given both in RPM and ATA see here:

...

 

So my question would be do the game engine limits only consider RPM or both RPM/ATA? Because if it's the latter the engine ought to last longer in emergency above FTH.

 

Why not just take your favourite 109/190 ride to different altitudes and test. It should take you less than half an hour to do this. From what I've seen, lower ATA at max RPM does give you more time. However, this is not really relevant, since most dogfights in this game take place below 5000m.

Edited by Raven109

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Video above is specifically about 190 and a d9 at that and the controller.  So from my understanding is that system was designed to be utilized eyeballing rpm.  As far as what this game models on timers no clue I would always fly tech chat off and to the real world specifications per bird.  Generally don’t run into problems that way.

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Fair enough, I've flown the 109 sometimes just by RPM and sometimes just by ATA. In-game, if you want to be conservative you use RPM, if you want max performance you use ATA.

 

Meaning that, if you're at 9k and fly at max RPM in a G6 you will expect the engine to last just 1-2 minutes, however in reality it will last ~3.5 minutes. By using just the RPM you are being conservative. 


If you fly by ATA, you will see that even if you're at the max permissible RPM for that engine, the engine will last longer, since the ATA is lower at higher altitudes.

 

But, as I've said, these things only apply at mid to high altitudes, at lower altitudes (below FTH) you can use either the ATA or RPM to manage your engine. 

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Posted (edited)

The 109's have a MW50 guage and boost is at full throttle only.

 

The radial 190's have a red lever that physically pulls back to actuate. You often have to fly these by RPM not ATA

 

The D9 has a MW50 switch and a Gauge reading it's pressure.

Edited by driftaholic

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The D-9 is flown by RPM, because it's designed to work that way.

You'd cross-reference the ATA-gauge for a ballpark figure, but the primary indicator was RPM on that bird.

D9pwersummary.jpg.632a0d6780bb719f6295d1dd25cccf66.jpg

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4 hours ago, Yogiflight said:

Yes, I remember that, too and it is what I am doing until we reach the altitudes in which the manifold pressure gets less, then I switch over to view the RPMs.

In the 190, however, you get into trouble, with the pressure hole between 2-3K, so its better to stay with RPM all the time.

 

I think Yogiflight offered the best answer why you should use RPM in the D9 rather than ATA. In the D9 ATA is not constant up to FTH, while in the 109 it is, due to its hydraulic coupled compressor. 

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19 hours ago, [DBS]Browning said:

Don't be too concerned about flying at the maximum limit.

Have a gentle cruise speed. In combat use all the power you need, but not more.

Exactly! Also, with a good set of headphones you can tell when to increase and back off by the sound of the engine.

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, hnbdgr said:

 

Thanks, yes that's what I'm doing too normally. But higher up say at 7,000m a throttle position of 100% will not give you full ATA.

 

In the 109 F-4 at 7,000 meters, ATA reads 1.09 @ 2700RPM

In the 109 G-4 at 7,000 meters, ATA reads 1.29 @ 2800RPM

 

Both on autumn map, not sure if time of year and air density has any effect on ATA at altitude, probably.

 

Thanks. Yes as 41Sqn_Skipper  indicated as well,  that seems to be the way to do it. My question then is - why do actual plane manuals say the limit is to be observed at RPM/ATA combination not just RPM.

 

This is my point from earlier. 

 

I assure you,  engine power is function of RPM*ATA. In german planes the superchargerr is automatic and will try to give you the most ATA possible for the altitude you aaree at.

 

But that doesn't change the fact that Piston engine inherently loose power as air pressure decreases (either because ATA decreases directly (no supercharger case) or because the supercharger needs to extract moree work from the engine to compress in intake (=> more efficient, but still an overall loss of power)).

 

Thus in your exemple, if 'MAX POWER' ATA can't be reached anymore at altitude, you can just leave the throttle full open ...

 

I  don't know how it is implemented in game exactly. But a reasonable approximation would be that engines are limited by the power produced (ATA*RPM) + There is also a limit on higher RPM than normal. ATA by itself shouldn't matter much as higher ATA barely adds strain to the engine, what is important is the ratio ATA*RPMA.

 

All this is very clear on the german BD605 birds with automatic supercharger and RPM. It gets a bit more complicated with variable RPM & superchargers, but principlle stay the same.

Edited by [301]luckyhendrix

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On 5/24/2020 at 11:08 AM, [301]luckyhendrix said:

I  don't know how it is implemented in game exactly. But a reasonable approximation would be that engines are limited by the power produced (ATA*RPM) + There is also a limit on higher RPM than normal. ATA by itself shouldn't matter much as higher ATA barely adds strain to the engine, what is important is the ratio ATA*RPMA.

 

Ah, that's what I'd like to know. I too think it should be ATA+RPM

 

On 5/23/2020 at 9:26 PM, Raven109 said:

So, ATA is considered by the timers, to some extent, it's not just the RPM. Lower ATA will allow you to use the max throttle setting for a longer time. I think it's safe to use ATA.

 

Seems like I'll need to test this!

 

So final question - Where the engine limits set by manufacturer (say 1 minute for 1.42ATA) valid for all altitudes or only up to critical altitude with a natural leeway after that? (when ATA starts to drop)

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Posted (edited)
59 minutes ago, hnbdgr said:

So final question - Where the engine limits set by manufacturer (say 1 minute for 1.42ATA) valid for all altitudes or only up to critical altitude with a natural leeway after that? (when ATA starts to drop)

 

Those limits were there to prevent extended wear and tear on the engines / sortie hour. They were issued for combinations of ATA and RPM. So, if reducing one of the parameters (ATA) reduces wear and tear, then it should logically follow that the time you can run your engine at the new setting should increase. Since above FTH you can't get the same ATA anymore to have the max power output, then you should be safe to run the engine longer at max RPM.

 

There is a large discussion on these forums regarding the consequences of going over those limits (whether it's valid to have them as strict as they are implemented or not - there are good arguments both for and against). 

 

-----

 

You can actually do an experiment. Take a G6 for example to 2500m, well below FTH. Push the throttle to the max, set propeller pitch to manual, reduce the throttle, while using the propeller pitch controls to keep the RPM at maximum (2800). You can run the engine at 1.0 ATA and 2800 RPM for much longer than a minute. It's the same situation above FTH. Lower ATA will yield longer operation times.

 

But, you will still not get the same time before the engine breaks as if you were running it at 1.15ATA and 2300 RPM, which shows that RPM matters as well.

Edited by Raven109

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54 minutes ago, hnbdgr said:

So final question - Where the engine limits set by manufacturer (say 1 minute for 1.42ATA) valid for all altitudes or only up to critical altitude with a natural leeway after that? (when ATA starts to drop)

 

42 minutes ago, Raven109 said:

Those limits were there to prevent extended wear and tear on the engines / sortie hour. They were issued for combinations of ATA and RPM. So, if reducing one of the parameters (ATA) reduces wear and tear, then it should logically follow that the time you can run your engine at the new setting should increase. Since above FTH you can't get the same ATA anymore to have the max power output, then you should be safe to run the engine longer at max RPM.

As anyone else I don't know, how it really is implemented in game. But, of course high RPMs stress the engine. If this would not be the case, you could turn it with as high revs as possible. There is a reason, why you are not allowed to overturn your engine in a dive, even with low power. High RPMs always mean stress to the moving parts.

 

58 minutes ago, hnbdgr said:

ATA by itself shouldn't matter much as higher ATA barely adds strain to the engine,

Of course higher pressure in your engine strains it. Mainly the gaskets don't take unlimited pressure.

 

The limits for RPM and ATA don't mean, that your engine only takes damage, if you overuse both limits, but that you will stress your engine already by overusing one of them.

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Posted (edited)
41 minutes ago, Yogiflight said:

 

As anyone else I don't know, how it really is implemented in game. But, of course high RPMs stress the engine. If this would not be the case, you could turn it with as high revs as possible. There is a reason, why you are not allowed to overturn your engine in a dive, even with low power. High RPMs always mean stress to the moving parts.

 

I think we're in agreement here. Yes, RPM matters as well, and the game does model this. I was just giving an example where reducing ATA, but keeping RPM constant increases the in-game timer. The reason I chose ATA is because MAP starts dropping above FTH, so you can still have max admissible RPM at lower ATA, which in theory should allow you to run your engine for a bit longer than when running at max ATA and max RPM. Of course the time will not be as long as when running at a lower RPM. One more reason why I chose ATA is because IRL reducing RPM before MAP can lead to a catastrophic failure (not sure if this applies to the 109 as well,  although I suspect it does).

 

It is interesting to see that even though some pilots claim to have been running the 109 by looking at the ATA gauge, there are pictures showing 109 dashboards where the max allowable time limits were added to the RPM gauge, which indicates, that at least some pilots had a preference for RPM. There were some pics, but I can't find them now.

-----------

Here is one (note the 3' limit marking next to the 2700 RPM marking):

lDwaof.jpg.e67db52365ad6f9461399495a259737b.jpg

 

IRL it probably makes sense to watch the RPM gauge more than ATA. This is because you want to be conservative. High RPM still stresses the engine, even though your ATA is lower. Maybe this is one of the reasons why later 109 models have the RPM gauge moved higher up, and the ATA lower, but I don't have any sources to confirm this.

 

In-game all you care about is to maximize performance (so what if you have to ditch in the wild Kuban forests?), so then considering ATA makes sense.

Edited by Raven109

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Posted (edited)
58 minutes ago, Yogiflight said:

 

 

 

Of course higher pressure in your engine strains it. Mainly the gaskets don't take unlimited pressure.

 

 

 

Not really. Intake manifold pressure (or easier ATA) does not directly change strain on engine. the difference of force on the intake between 0.6ATA. and 1.2ATA. is 0.8bars, a very small pressure difference with regards to what metals can sustain. Plus, the strain due to pressure is maximum when the throttle is closed .. as there the difference between intake pressure and outside pressure is at most 1bar, very small pressure for any metal structure to sustain. 

 

So that is why I say that ATA alone does not give any indication of engine strain by it self alone.

What ATA actualy is, is a measure of engine suction. This, coupled with RPM gives an acurate image of engine Power. Fortunately for us, normaly our fighter either have a) an automatic prop pitch b) operate at quite constant RPM and thus as RPM is relatively constant, now ATA can be used to gauge engine power.

But for very weird configuration (very low RPMs or RPM generated by dive with throttle closed) ATA is not a revelant indicator of engine power anymore. But one as to ask if it is even revelant to know what happens in those configuration, as normaly pilots should operate close to the nominal engine parameters and not try to 'game' the system. As IRL there can be nothing gained by trying exotics ATA/RPM configuration.  If the manufacturer specified a continuous RPM &combat RPM it is for a good reason and it is one that gives usualy good engine performance and acceptable strain.

Edited by [301]luckyhendrix

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, [301]luckyhendrix said:

 

Not really. Intake manifold pressure (or easier ATA) does not directly change strain on engine. the difference of force on the intake between 0.6ATA. and 1.2ATA. is 0.8bars, a very small pressure difference with regards to what metals can sustain. Plus, the strain due to pressure is maximum when the throttle is closed .. as there the difference between intake pressure and outside pressure is at most 1bar, very small pressure for any metal structure to sustain. 

 

So that is why I say that ATA alone does not give any indication of engine strain by it self alone.

What ATA actualy is, is a measure of engine suction. This, coupled with RPM gives an acurate image of engine Power. Fortunately for us, normaly our fighter either have a) an automatic prop pitch b) operate at quite constant RPM and thus as RPM is relatively constant, now ATA can be used to gauge engine power.

But for very weird configuration (very low RPMs or RPM generated by dive with throttle closed) ATA is not a revelant indicator of engine power anymore. But one as to ask if it is even revelant to know what happens in those configuration, as normaly pilots should operate close to the nominal engine parameters

 

I'd argue that higher ATA does stress the engine more than lower. And maybe not directly, but with higher ATA more fuel is injected into the cylinder, which leads to more powerful explosions and an increase in CHT. An excessive increase in CHT can lead to pre-ignition and/or engine knocking.

 

Perhaps we're in agreement and it's just a matter of semantics.

Edited by Raven109

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2 hours ago, [301]luckyhendrix said:

If the manufacturer specified a continuous RPM &combat RPM it is for a good reason and it is one that gives usualy good engine performance and acceptable strain.

You know, he also gives advices for ATA for continous, combat and emergency mode, might be of some importance, too, don't you think?

Additionally I talked about the gaskets, which are not made of metal and can be damaged by higher pressure.

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This is a great topic. What I am getting out of this is to be mindful of ATA and the RPM. I have to admit, even with tehcnochat, I often loose track of my throttle. I usually do look down to check my speed and temp. I have noticed that there is color markings on the throttle as well. They seem to connect with idle, combat and emergency. I use my mouse to look around and thus it is more convenient to use the mouse wheel to manage the throttle This means I cannot tell my power input. With the percentage popping up this was not a problem. 

 

I guess my question is how responsive is the RPM and ATA to your throttle input? What's the delay. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, [=PzG=]-FlyinPinkPanther said:

This is a great topic. What I am getting out of this is to be mindful of ATA and the RPM. I have to admit, even with tehcnochat, I often loose track of my throttle. I usually do look down to check my speed and temp. I have noticed that there is color markings on the throttle as well. They seem to connect with idle, combat and emergency. I use my mouse to look around and thus it is more convenient to use the mouse wheel to manage the throttle This means I cannot tell my power input. With the percentage popping up this was not a problem. 

 

I guess my question is how responsive is the RPM and ATA to your throttle input? What's the delay. 

 

 

 

Depends on the plane. In the 109 at below full throttle height ATA reaction to throttle is quite instantaneous. Automatic pitch adjustment then sets the desired RPM. When there's a huge gap between current and desired position then it takes ~ 2-3 seconds perhaps for the RPM to fall in line. When it's 2500->2700 it's almost straight away. However this behaviour doesn't quite work above FTH, seems to be a bit sketchy. Especially on the threshold between 2500-2700RPM it can go in jumps RPM reacts sluggishly.  In A/C with constant prop, RPM maintains itself and boost response is again almost instantaneous across all altitudes more or less.

 

I'd suggest to get a trackir or an alternative solution to have one hand free for throttle management. Can't properly do it without it.

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Thanks I fly 109s. 

 

I can't get a track IR until my wife says I can. LOL. It isn't just the TIR I would need to get but an upgrade stick and throttle system as well. 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/24/2020 at 9:07 AM, Smelly_Fella said:

Exactly! Also, with a good set of headphones you can tell when to increase and back off by the sound of the engine.

I do this, mostly by ears. They warn me when to get an eye on gauges because "something sounds odd". Been flying tech chat off for a pair of years now. I can count the number of engine overstress on one hand, you get used to it pretty fast, tbh. Ofc, I'm probably less "to the edge" than someone flying "percent perfect", but that's imho more in-line to how it was flown back in the days, I like it.

Since ears is a consequence of RPM (the thing that catch your ears are changes in sound pitch, which come with RPM change), mostly, I can say I fly by RPM :) , though there's also a ATA component in the engine growl sound. You hear pretty well A8 difficulties between 2 & 3 kms, for example.

Edited by kalbuth
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image.png.ababe9c17bedd2e0e7dcbd26e2677a00.png

 

109E, showing time limits for both the ATA and the RPM gauge.

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7 minutes ago, Raven109 said:

image.png.ababe9c17bedd2e0e7dcbd26e2677a00.png

 

109E, showing time limits for both the ATA and the RPM gauge.

You can see those markings in our 110 E2, too. They were white at the beginning, but they greyed them out, I guess because they don't fit to the engine the 110 E2 has in game. The markings are most likely for the DB 601 P, which was the production engine of the E2.

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16 hours ago, hnbdgr said:

 

Depends on the plane. In the 109 at below full throttle height ATA reaction to throttle is quite instantaneous. Automatic pitch adjustment then sets the desired RPM. When there's a huge gap between current and desired position then it takes ~ 2-3 seconds perhaps for the RPM to fall in line. When it's 2500->2700 it's almost straight away. However this behaviour doesn't quite work above FTH, seems to be a bit sketchy. Especially on the threshold between 2500-2700RPM it can go in jumps RPM reacts sluggishly.  In A/C with constant prop, RPM maintains itself and boost response is again almost instantaneous across all altitudes more or less.

 

I'd suggest to get a trackir or an alternative solution to have one hand free for throttle management. Can't properly do it without it.

 

 

Yeah, I took a G4 up last night. The change was instantaneous. I went up to 5000 meters and the same thing. 

 

This is slightly on or off topic. I was looking at the throttle. 

Looking at it there are deisgnations

Zu, P1, P2, and M2. 

Between Zu and P1 are three colors. Red, "Gold" and White. 

 

The Gold appears to be the power needed to taxi. The top starts the plane moving. 

P2. Is Combat 

Between P1 and P2 you have Nominal power. 

I do not know what the 'white" and the P1 is supposed to represent other than "idle power." It doesn't seem right. The ATA 0.6 and below 2000 RPM. 

 

 

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7 hours ago, [=PzG=]-FlyinPinkPanther said:

 

 

Yeah, I took a G4 up last night. The change was instantaneous. I went up to 5000 meters and the same thing. 

 

This is slightly on or off topic. I was looking at the throttle. 

Looking at it there are deisgnations

Zu, P1, P2, and M2. 

Between Zu and P1 are three colors. Red, "Gold" and White. 

 

The Gold appears to be the power needed to taxi. The top starts the plane moving. 

P2. Is Combat 

Between P1 and P2 you have Nominal power. 

I do not know what the 'white" and the P1 is supposed to represent other than "idle power." It doesn't seem right. The ATA 0.6 and below 2000 RPM. 

 

 

P1, P2 and M2 have nothing to do with the throttle, those are the positions for the red head lever right of the throttle (Brandhahn), which lets the fuel to the engine. It moves forward to position M2 during the startup procedure. In other aircrafts M2 is named P1 + P2.

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