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39 minutes ago, 1PL-Husar-1Esk said:

They know shit about GDPR and deny access to this arctice...

 

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The opera browser has an inbuilt VPN. Until you get it:

 

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The Bowling Green man flying a restored, World War I-era de Havilland DH-4 biplane that crashed at the Bowling Green-Warren County Regional Airport on Saturday walked away from the wreckage mostly unscathed, which the pilot called a tribute to the aircraft’s grit.

“It’s a testimony to how well built this plane is,” said Dorian Walker, who said he had no serious injuries after the wooden plane crashed in a field at the airport Saturday morning. The DH-4 was the only original plane of its kind still flying, Walker said.

“It’s the first American-built warplane,” Walker said of the plane’s model, which was adapted from the British DH-4 after America entered WWI in 1917 with no combat-worthy aircraft at the time, according to the National Air and Space Museum.

 

Dubbed the “Liberty Plane,” it was in use by several bomber squadrons, and in the post-war period, became the principal aircraft used by the U.S. government when airmail service began in 1918. To this day, it’s remembered as the great-grandfather of the country’s warplanes, Walker said.

“It’s important to the American fabric of today,” Walker said.

Walker, along with the group that helped restore the aircraft – Friends of Vintage Flight – hoped to use it as an educational tool. It was scheduled to tour several U.S. Air Force bases and in France before the coronavirus pandemic forced those events to be postponed, Walker said.

“We’re not exactly sure what happened,” Walker said. As he made a loop above the airport, Walker said he began to notice control issues with the plane. He managed to return it to the airport before the crash landing, which wasn’t far from where he took off.

 

Dr. Darrell Tade, a major with the Civil Air Patrol, witnessed the crash and said he examined Walker after the crash, finding only minor injuries. While the takeoff seemed like a normal one, Tade said he noticed the left wing dip down on the landing.

“The pilot controlled it as well as anyone could have,” Tade said, crediting Walker for returning to the airport before the crash.

This is the second local crash of a historic plane that Walker has been connected to: In August 2017, a 1917-vintage Curtiss JN-4 biplane known as the Jenny, which Walker owned, crash landed at CrossWinds Golf Course next to the airport. While that plane was ultimately repaired, the fate of the DH-4 is uncertain, Walker said.

“We’ve got to investigate with the (National Transportation Safety Board),” he said.

Walker has 350 hours of flight experience flying older biplanes, he said. A team of technicians invested about 10,000 hours in the aircraft’s restoration.

“I think their spirit brought me down OK,” Walker said.

 
 

Correction

This story has been updated since its initial publication to correct the description of Dorian Walker's connection to the 2017 crash of the Curtiss JN-4 biplane.

Source: https://www.bgdailynews.com/news/local-pilot-survives-crash-of-historic-wwi-era-biplane/article_ba8ca2ec-f4ec-570b-b2a3-cd2ab089ccf5.html?fbclid=IwAR3eGpX86bkHJ_9SxlLn2EsaLwC9-J955UlGADxV4-kTtL7KNkW5xfTYcWk

 

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Edited by Raven109
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18 minutes ago, hobotango said:

Why do they take the chance to ruin such artifacts. Just leave it there in the museum for all to enjoy for generations to come. 

 

Rubbish... take people to a museum and they will take a quick look, notice a dusty old plane in the corner.

Take them to see it fly where they can watch living history, listen to that engine and even smell it when it lands and taxi's past... it's something they will never forget!

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On 5/4/2020 at 4:33 PM, Trooper117 said:

 

Rubbish... take people to a museum and they will take a quick look, notice a dusty old plane in the corner.

Take them to see it fly where they can watch living history, listen to that engine and even smell it when it lands and taxi's past... it's something they will never forget!

Yeah but thats not going to matter when they die. Dont think, 25 years later, think 350 years later. 

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“We’re not exactly sure what happened,” Walker said. As he made a loop above the airport, Walker said he began to notice control issues with the plane. He managed to return it to the airport before the crash landing, which wasn’t far from where he took off.

 

He looped it?  Worlds only flying DH4?:(

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In Norway they restore a historical plane and its engine as far as it goes. Like factory new and if possible flyable. But never airworthy. There have been engine swaps to airworthy planes. 
And we do have a few airworthy vintage warplanes. 
I am not against flying legends but one and only ww 1 airworthy type should not do acrobatics it should be flown with no risk of tiering the construction. But owners legally can do that if they are certified for it

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I have my doubts as to how much of the DH4's structural components would have been original. Many aircraft 'restorations' consist mostly of new parts, with at minimum, only the manufacturer's identification plate being needed to qualify legally.

 

A shame to see any aircraft like that, but it could have been a whole lot worse. And I wouldn't rely on a press report to allocate blame to the pilot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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46 minutes ago, AndyJWest said:

I have my doubts as to how much of the DH4's structural components would have been original. Many aircraft 'restorations' consist mostly of new parts, with at minimum, only the manufacturer's identification plate being needed to qualify legally.

In doubt, you will exchange the "original" part with an exact same copy. Effectively, the plane would remain similar (and similarly original) to the original. Besides, bottom up restorations often are a total destruction of the "original" to get template for making new parts. It is the sensible thing to do. If you want to keep the all original material, you CANNOT keep it operational.

 

A big problem with these wooden crates is that damage is largely invisible. You just don't see cracks in the wood unless you take off all canvas and somehow put the crate under load stress to see how the individial sections bend. Even then it would be difficult to get much meaning from the test. But it is one of the reasons hat you don't put such aircraft under significant load. You just don't know what happens to them internally. Back when these planes were new, you'd just throw away any part you wouldn't trust anymore and replace it with new parts/sections off the shelf. Today, they are unfixable unless you build them as a new copy from scratch.

 

Now, IF there was damage to the structure, further high g-load would make the structure give in a bit. As load dynamically distributes over several points, damage in one point is hardly sufficiant to make a wing come off. With damage, you're altering the rigging of the wings and control wires as stoon as the structure starts to give in. Wings don't come off like that after structural overload. Same goes for FC where "wings just come off". The accident described here is something that *can* happen.

 

 

 

 

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A quick Google search shows that the crash had nothing to do with any 'loop':

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"It departed normally, but then as I started to turn into what is the normal traffic pattern I noticed that the left-wing dropped and so I took all the normal elective procedures. I have an extensive amount of hours flying historic and old airplanes," added Walker. "So I took all the normal procedures to fly one of these antiques and it didn't respond very well, so I knew at this point that I needed to make sure I got to the field as quickly as possible and proceeded on that course of action

https://www.wbko.com/content/news/Man-survives-plane-crash-at-the-Bowling-Green-Warren-County-Regional-Airport-570144171.html

 

This was the restored aircraft's first flight. See also this video: it doesn't show the crash, but seems to tally with what the pilot says. Take off, find control issues, circle to land, but get into trouble.

 

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On 5/4/2020 at 12:49 PM, J74_PINK said:

 

 

 

I have to say this J74_PINK,  you have one of the best avatars in this forum.:lol:

Edited by Jaws2002
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