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This sounds awesome! I'll try to make it!

16 minutes ago, VBF-12_Stele said:

VBF-12 is hosting an Operation Stosser mission this Saturday, December 19 at 9:30pm EST. The mission covers the beginning of the Ardennes offensive when the Germans attempted to drop Fallschirmjagers behind Allied lines during the snowy night.

 

This is a night paradrop mission following the exact waypoints, weather conditions, and challenges of flying the Ju-52. If you do not own the Ju-52, we'll have He-111s available to fly ahead of the formation.

 

We'll be using Discord for comms and you are invited to jump in and fly with us. Bring your hot coco, as we expect this to be a bit of a cold flight.

 

https://discord.gg/7Mn5DCun

 

 

Is there a mission briefing page up anywhere yet? I'd like to practice flying the ju-52 in those situations, it's been a while haha. I'll try to make it!

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20 minutes ago, kestrel79 said:

This sounds awesome! I'll try to make it!

 

 

Is there a mission briefing page up anywhere yet? I'd like to practice flying the ju-52 in those situations, it's been a while haha. I'll try to make it!

 

Yes. Here is the briefing for the mission. Looking forward to seeing and others!

 

December 17, 1944

Wx: Heavy snow, winds moving west at 5 m/s

==================================

Wacht am Rhein is in full force as of yesterday. In our sector, the 6th SS Panzer Army is pushing westward under cover of storm with a surprising amount of mechanized vehicles and heavy tanks. The 12th SS Panzer Division requires assistance holding a key road junction in the Hohes Venn area. We are sending a small force of Fallschirmjagers led by Oberstleutnant Graf von der Heydte, an experienced jumper. His men are to secure the drop zone and will be relieved by the 12th SS Panzer Division during the daytime.

 

We are sending Ju-52s from Paderborn for the job to drop van der Heydte's men in the area under the cover of night. With the snow starting this hour, we expect visibility to be extremely minimal. The winds may present a problem as they could veer you off of your waypoints along with turbulence at times.

Our ground forces will guide you to your waypoints during the night. We have lit the runway with lights and will guide you out with searchlights. Your first waypoint is at Plettenberg. Look for the searchlights and flares from our ground forces, there. Second waypoint is Bonn. The airfield will be lit up and the ground forces will also shine searchlights and flares. Third waypoint is near Monschau near the frontline; again look for the searchlights and flares. Once you pass over it you will head directly to the dropzone. Look for incendiary fires in the form of a cross to drop the Fallschirmjagers. Return to base once you complete your drop.

Threats may consist of enemy searchlights and flak near the frontline. Due to the weather conditions, it may be difficult to spot you, but anti-air fire could be heavy. The weather conditions may pose a problem near mountainous regions. Be careful not to fly into the side of a hill or mountain if the cloud base is too low.

Historical note: The operation was a failure on many levels. Only one third van der Heydte's original force of 1,300 men assembled. Most of the transports scattered the jumps near the drop zone, others were shot down by anti-air fire, and the rest completely missed their targets by 8 miles or more. The 12th SS Panzer Division never advanced far enough to relieve van der Heydte's forces. The Ju-52 pilots did not have enough combat experience prior to the operation. Many became disoriented due to the night and heavy weather with some returning to Panderborn with their men still on board.

 

Play note: This is a long flight to the drop zone. If a player is disconnected, they can return and join up by spawning at any of the respawn points. Players should only respawn there and join the flight. Players that don't own the Ju-52 can fly the He-111h6 as a pathfinder, however at least one Ju-52 must drop troops in the dropzone.

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  • 5 weeks later...
On 3/21/2020 at 9:37 AM, saldy said:

New scripted campaign WIP🙂

 

 

I was one of the saldy's campaign testers and I have to admit that if you like Ju-52, you should try it!

It is so funny to get with this marvellous plane into 3500 m / 11,482 feets.

And Caucasus is very good designed in the game.:-)

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  • 2 weeks later...

The final report of the tragic crash of the Ju-52 HB-HOT has been published.

 

The report  is here: English / German

 

The Newpaper "Tagesanzeiger" has made an article and video about the accident, summarizing the main causes (in German).

 

A (very) short summary

 

Direct cause:

 

  • Unsuitable choice of the flight path approaching the mountain pass making the crossing of the ridge at the desired place the only possibility. The approach was made such that it let the aircraft fly through an extended zone of downdraft approaching the Segnes pass. The flight path was such that the aircraft ended up trapped by the surrounding ridge.
  • Although having had enough altitude initially, the downdraft made the pilots compensate the gradual loss of altitude by lifting the nose. The progressive nose up attitude made the pilots unaware of the actual loss of altitude (that still incurred) that by that time made the crossing of the pass questionable.
  • In that very moment, the aircraft progressed toward the opposite mountain side, where a significant updraft was present. (Actually, this is the normal sitaution as should be expected in that place with the present wind direction.) This caused the airflow over the wing to shift to coming from a more dwonward angle, exceeding momentarily max. AoA and the wing stalled instantly.
  • Insufficient ground clearance made stall recovery impossible.

 

Indirect causes:

 

  • Old boys culture. All pilots are extremely experienced career pilots. Yet being from the good old days they felt different standards apply to them when having fun. More than once they instinctively lifted their butts in the seats when crossing a pass. (Ha-ha.)
  • Maintenance. Although there is no directly linked fault present in the aircraft, it became evident that maintenance was not very thorough to a degree where the aircrafts actual performance did not match specifications anymore. Not just corrosion or cosmetic faults, but also engine related wear was present to a degree that puts all remaining BMW radial engines in question. (AFAIK, the to-be-made-flyable-again Ju-52 will get the same P&W engines as D-AQUI.)

 

I often think it should be mandatory for any PPL pilot to fly a glider for some hours in the mountains before getting clearance to fly near larger hills. That flight path was an obscene stupidity. The fact that it offers the most scenic view does not count here. And there are plenty of GA pilots just sitting behind their engines, just driving about. And no, more power is not the answer, those mountains happily eat Mustangs piloted by the best as well.

 

I also can't help being reminded of the Collings Foundation B-17 crash. Also there, residual trust by the authorities in the "old boys" let tem get sloppy, probably out of sheer necessity as a "factory new" overhaul of the aircraft would be a problem financially as well as it basically would lead to a structurally new built aircraft. Continued use of oldtimers makes their substance go away. At some point you will have replaced everything. The problem here is, this wear doesn't come cradually. A well built vehicle can be operated for a long time if handled with care, but at some point just about everything is foul and has to be replaced. If you miss this opportunity to make a museum exhibit of it or should you not have near unlimited funds to essentially rebuild the aircraft as new, duct tape will only hold for so long until it will fail on you. With sa(i)d consequences.

 

The association of volunteers that operates the aircraft is now undergoing a larger change. Junkers is moving to Altenrhein, leaving only one Ju-52 in Dübendorf. That one will then most likely remain a static display item. The other aircraft will be restored over time in Altenrhein and possibly operate from there as their main base. Last year, also the Fiesler Storch collection left Dübendorf except one famous historic (and all original and in flyable condition) example that belongs to the Swiss Federation. After the untimely and sudden death of the previous owner, the other 6 Storchs were sold off.

 

This is indeed the closing of a book. There needs to be a thorough discussion of how to preserve historic artefacts and how to show them to the public as they really are. Also, the role and deeper purpose of a museum needs to be evaluated. Not that I collect firearms, but I think Ian McCollum on his Channel "Forgotten Weapons" raises an important issue. Is a museum a location of entertainment and Wikipedia the scource of knowledge? Or shouldn't really be the museum the place where you go when I have questions that are of specialist nature? Can a non-functional artifact really tell me about what it does?

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Thanks, sad thing still. Maybe someone indeed can program this fatal flight on the Kuban map in the ME as Ju52 tester? 

 

Edited by jollyjack
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Thanks for posting and the summary, I missed this post but read through the report and some of the annexes already.

 

For me the bottom line - if you take risks where you depend on not having bad luck, one day you will have pushed it too far. Low level flights, in particular in a stunning landscape like the Alps, are very tempting, but you need to keep listening to your head...

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  • 1 month later...
On 3/21/2021 at 12:39 AM, Monostripezebra said:

Off course, it is best to bring DC3 and Ju52 together..

 

 

You have gotten closer to flying the C-47 than anyone else in the community right now.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello everybody,

 

I am a bit confused about the engines and brakes in the Ju52 with the HOTAS Warthog

How can you have it assigned in your HOTAS? I mean, if I have a Bf110 or any other two-engined planes, the left is n1 and right n2, so the brakes in the pedals is easy, left and right and another key for both at the same time. The throttle is easy too in the HOTAS Warthog.

 

But how can you do it in the Ju52???

Where do you assign engine 3, together with n1 or with n2?

What about the brakes? I don´t understand why in the Ju52 engine 3 is not the central one. It would make more sense, wouldn´t it?

Edited by =gRiJ=Roman-
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Hello Gents,

 

sorry if lame question, but if I turn on GUI with "H", this number "5" and this green column appears for Ju-52. What is it?

 

Sorry, aileron trimm was a mix up from my side. No aileron trim, right?

 

Thanks for inputs !

Ju52.JPG

Edited by 102.R.dd_Blade18
mistake found
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39 minutes ago, 102.R.dd_Blade18 said:

Hello Gents,

 

sorry if lame question, but if I turn on GUI with "H", this number "5" and this green column appears for Ju-52. What is it?

 

Sorry, aileron trimm was a mix up from my side. No aileron trim, right?

 

Thanks for inputs !

Ju52.JPG

The 5 is for the flare pistol, 5 green flares.  Put up the flare pistol to get rid of it.  Check your controls for a orange square in flare controls to see if you have a double key bind somewhere.

 

No aileron trim.

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