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How did they do it?


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Same planes like the Albatros have instruments like the temperature gauge or speedometer as an modification.

So, how do you fly these planes without selecting modifications? How did the first pilots manage without knowing the temperature of their engine or speed or height of the plane?

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Pure guesswork. If it steams it's too hot and if the people below look like ants then you are up high. Powered flight was so new that they were learning as they went. At the start of WW1 the RAF had just five squadrons and none of the aeroplanes were armed. They flew from Dover to France and had bets as to who would get there first - if they made it across the Channel at all. It was all very much 'Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines' back then.

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For temperature, there is radiator steam if it's to hot. Earlier Albatros models did not even have radiator control, it was always open.

For speed, altitude etc... they did not. Anenometer in German planes is an afterthought anyway, and there was little need for knowing precise values. Speed was estimated by seat of the pants, and altitude by eyeball. They were not taking photos, leaving friendly airspace or making flights that required complicated navigation, so information beyond where they are, where the enemy is, where the flight leader is and what is the engine RPM was "nice to have" anyway.

BTW, the modifications were added few years into Rise of Llight development, so our oldest virtual pilots were flying in the same conditions for some time. They may have better insights.

 

Edited by J2_Trupobaw
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Maybe they used their ears, listening the sound of their engine.

Or maybe they used a standar setting for every altitude, for example set for 1000m, set for 2000m and maybe one setting for combat. 

About the speed, they had an anometer instal on their butt: butt is excellent speed and attitude sensor eh eh

 

 

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5 minutes ago, LeNobleItalien said:

 

About the speed, they had an anometer instal on their butt: butt is excellent speed and attitude sensor eh eh

 

 

Not really, modern pilots are taught to trust instruments first and their senses far second. But this is now and that was then. Flying hunting plane (especially German one) was more like riding a flying horse than exact science it is now. 

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Thanks all for your explanations.

I still find it hard to believe that after 3 years of fighting in a war that pilots would not have a clue about their engine's temperature during a mission.

 

I guess my thoughts were that many of these 'modifications' would be standard for planes coming into the war in 1917/18.

 

Anyway, I just keep enjoying every minute in these planes. ☺️

 

Happy flying and FTV.

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4 hours ago, 216th_Cat said:

Pure guesswork. If it steams it's too hot and if the people below look like ants then you are up high. Powered flight was so new that they were learning as they went. At the start of WW1 the RAF had just five squadrons and none of the aeroplanes were armed. They flew from Dover to France and had bets as to who would get there first - if they made it across the Channel at all. It was all very much 'Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines' back then.

 

I realise this is pedantic but there was no squadrons and no aeroplanes in the Royal Air Force when the Great War began. Because the Royal Air Force did not exist until 1st April 1918. Before then there was just the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service. The Royal Naval Air Service had (according to The Fleet Air Arm: An Illustrated History) about 90 frontline aircraft and 7 airships which they then assembled together at Eastchurch, as for armed, the first aerial bombing mission was carried out not long after on 22nd September (they had been developing the ability before the war, the first release of a bomb from an aircraft being in 1912).

Edited by Oliver88
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2 hours ago, Oliver88 said:

 

I realise this is pedantic but there was no squadrons and no aeroplanes in the Royal Air Force when the Great War began. Because the Royal Air Force did not exist until 1st April 1918. Before then there was just the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service. The Royal Naval Air Service had (according to The Fleet Air Arm: An Illustrated History) about 90 frontline aircraft and 7 airships which they then assembled together at Eastchurch, as for armed, the first aerial bombing mission was carried out not long after on 22nd September (they had been developing the ability before the war, the first release of a bomb from an aircraft being in 1912).

 

Haha, pedantic perhaps - but quite correct. I humbly take the reprimand and promise to put my brain into gear next time. 😬

Cheers. 🍺

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