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De Havilland Mosquito FB information


Megalax
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  • 3 months later...
ACG_Talisman

Folks,

 

This is a good term of reference for the Mosquito VI:

http://www.wwiiaircraftperformance.org/mosquito/Mosquito-VI-tactical.pdf

 

I like that 600 rounds of cannon ammunition and 2,000 rounds of .303 can be increased to 700 and 2,800 respectively. 

 

Hope we get the option of the Merlin 25 engine as covered in the above link.

 

Interesting that the navigator can sit sideways to keep a good lookout to the rear; hope our in-game navigator shouts out enemy contacts in good time!

 

The extra performance in single seater mode looks interesting (1,500 lbs of equipment removed)!  Also worthy of note in single seater mode, the inertia weight removed from the elevator control system.   

 

It will be good to fly this across the English Channel :)

 

Happy landings,

 

Talisman

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On 6/3/2020 at 11:21 AM, DD_Arthur said:

'Single seater mode' - in a Mossie?   Never heard of that before.  Was it ever used?

No

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RedKestrel

From the report there it looks like single seater mode improved things from a day fighter perspective, but not by enough to make the mosquito competitive. 

I plan on using it for low alt attack and interdiction, and maybe once in a while surprising some guy who blows past me and forgets you're not supposed to fly through the enemy's gunsight. 4 nose mounted 20mm cannons...I mean good lord you'll be able to shred any aircraft you get a bead on. It's basically got the Tempest's armament packed into the nose and that thing is like a delete key for enemy aircraft even when you don't hit at convergence.

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616Sqn_Johnny-Red

The tepid reception with which the Mosquito was first received is now a matter of aviation legend, but in some circles negative attitudes prevailed long after that famous first flying demonstration. Below is a fine example of the institutional innertia the Mosquito met with; albeit in bomber configuration:

 

"They had a bomb bay big enough to take four of our five-hunded-pound Target Indicators, and it seemed to me that if they could achieve the ceiling we required they would be perfectly suitable. I test-flew the Mosquito by day and by night, and we got on with the "test installation" of the Oboe equipment. At a meeting with the Air Ministry on the subject, Bomber Command and the Air Ministry both very strongly opposed the adoption of the Mosquito. They argued that it was a frail wood machine totally unsuitable for Service conditions, that it would be shot down because of its absence of gun turrets, and that in any case it was far too small to carry the equipment and an adequate Pathfinder crew. I dealt with each one of theses points in turn, but finally they played their ace. They declared that the Mosquito had been tested thouroughly by the appropriate establishments and found quite unsuitable, and indeed impossible to fly at night. At this I raised an eyebrow, and said that I was very sorry to hear it was quite impossible to fly it by night, as I had been doing so regularly during the last week and I had found nothing wrong. There was a deathly silence. I got my Mosquitoes."

 

Air Vice Marshall Donald Bennett, Pathfinder Force, from "The War in the Air 1939-1945" editted by Gavin Lyall, Vintage 2007.

 

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QB.Gordon200

One of the duties of the Mosquito navigator was to operate the manual landing gear pump in the event of hydraulic system failure.

Many RAF pilot said that was the only reason to have him along.

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II/JG17_HerrMurf
55 minutes ago, Gordon200 said:

One of the duties of the Mosquito navigator was to operate the manual landing gear pump in the event of hydraulic system failure.

Many RAF pilot said that was the only reason to have him along.

 

Seems pretty disrespectful of someone who shares all of the same dangers of combat as you do in very close proximity.

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QB.Gordon200
48 minutes ago, II/JG17_HerrMurf said:

 

Seems pretty disrespectful of someone who shares all of the same dangers of combat as you do in very close proximity.

It's a long standing RAF joke. Of course the pilots were appreciative of the navigator's contribution to the mission.

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1 hour ago, II/JG17_HerrMurf said:

 

Seems pretty disrespectful of someone who shares all of the same dangers of combat as you do in very close proximity.

Standard military banter. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
1 hour ago, 56RAF_Talisman said:

de HAVILLAND AIRCRAFT MUSEUM

 

 

I was in there on a quiet weekday twenty-five years ago - or thereabouts - having a gander at the prototype, and the old boy working there asked whether I'd like to climb up into the cockpit. Silly question. I'd still be in there now if the rest of my life wasn't calling. Absolutely brilliant to sit in there - wish that I'd have had the camera phone that we all have now. It's about time I went back there again; apart from anything else the prototype is painted in its correct colour now. When I saw it it was in some weird garish yellow. Cheers.

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  • 1 month later...

@Gambit21 to shed some more light on historical options for a Mosquito project. Within 2nd TAF in 1944 there were six Mosquito FB Mk VI squadrons, three squadrons grouped into either 138 or 140 Wing. These squadrons are the first six columns. The last two columns, 418 Sqdn and 605 Sqdn were part of 11 Group until their transfer to 2nd TAF in November. The pink shading means the airfield is NOT on the proposed BoN map as we know it. Green shading reflects airfields that could reasonably be found on the map.

 

203934875_19442TAFMosquitoSqdns.thumb.jpg.353cf8180398d0d9ffa8b0a33fdb8d88.jpg

 

If your project is prior to D-Day then historically four squadrons could be used, the three squadrons of 138 Wing at Lasham, and 418 Sqdn at Ford or Holmsley South.

 

715531064_PreDDayMosquitobases.jpg.a7bb110b3597f0c4b37b0748066e7aa2.jpg

 

The famous Amiens prison raid (Operation Jericho) was flown by 140 Wing's 21 Sqdn, 464 Sqdn, and 487 Sqdn that were NOT based on the BoN map at that time. To avoid any potential confusion I expressly ignored several Mosquito squadrons equipped with FB Mk VIs that were assigned to 100 Group (based off the map in Norfolk) and Coastal Command (all well off the map).

 

 

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