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6./ZG26_Klaus_Mann

How does the Body bleed Air from the Blood System?

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What natural Ways does they Body have to remove small amounts of Air or other Gasses from the Blood Stream? I get that large amounts of Gas in the Blood cause Embolisms, but what about very small amounts?

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5 minutes ago, 6./ZG26_Klaus_Mann said:

What natural Ways does they Body have to remove small amounts of Air or other Gasses from the Blood Stream? I get that large amounts of Gas in the Blood cause Embolisms, but what about very small amounts?

I don't think you would/should have gasses in the bloodstream under normal circumstances but I honestly have no idea.

The only time I've ever really heard of gasses in the blood stream is with diving for long periods of time or at greater depths/pressures and failing to decompress or not decompressing enough.

Edited by Legioneod
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Small amounts of air often get into the blood circulation accidentally during surgery and other medical procedures (for example, a bubble entering an intravenous fluid line), but most of these air emboli enter the veins and are stopped at the lungs, and thus a venous air embolism that shows any symptoms is very rare. Misuse of a syringe to meticulously remove air from the vascular tubing of a hemodialysis circuit can allow air into the vascular system. Venous air embolism is a rare complication of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures requiring catherization of a vein or artery. If a significant embolism occurs, the cardiovascular, pulmonary, or central nervous system may be affected. Interventions to remove or mitigate the embolism may include procedures to reduce bubble size, or withdrawal of air from the right atrium. So everyday real life there should be no air or gases entering the blood stream and if there is any can created dire consequences. 

 

Some research;


The amount of arterial gas embolism that causes symptoms depends on location — 2 mL of air in the cerebral circulation can be fatal, while 0.5 mL of air into a coronary artery can cause cardiac arrest.

 

But in the question you’re posing I’m wondering if very minute/trace amounts are handled by the lungs as carbon dioxide is released by your blood vessels in the lungs and picks up oxygen to be further distributed by the heart.
 

Do I hold a medical degree? No. But I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 

Joking aside, next week when I’m at the Mayo Clinic I’ll ask.

Edited by BornToBattle
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