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ME-BFMasserME262

Inspire me to love the almighty Mig

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This thread makes me feel much better about my piloting skills,¬†I thought it was just me and am so happy to be joined by so many of you all ūüėĄ¬†Flaps also do not respond as advertised for me, will check my bindings as that's something I've not done.

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1 hour ago, Hajo_Garlic said:

I use the engine in 2 modes

cruise: 80 mix, 100 rpm and throttle

combat 100 mix and rpm, variable throttle.

 

Different than other a/c but easy. 

Both rads get left ~35 and never any issues.

 

The mixture works a but different on the mig. At 50% it is in automatic mode, mode it to 100% and it goes to boost mode. it has a soft threshold between, but really you should only either use 100% or 50%. 

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38 minutes ago, 216th_Jordan said:

 

The mixture works a but different on the mig. At 50% it is in automatic mode, mode it to 100% and it goes to boost mode. it has a soft threshold between, but really you should only either use 100% or 50%. 

50 seems weak compared to 80

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7 minutes ago, Hajo_Garlic said:

50 seems weak compared to 80

 

Thats because its changeing to boost mode there. For normal flight you'd stay at 50%, for combat you'd go to 100%, the rest is done via throttle.

Ultimately it doesn't really matter, but that would be the proper procedure. (As you will see it is a lot easier to fine-tune manifold pressure by throttle than by mixture)

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17 hours ago, Dakpilot said:

But what I mean is (particularly with rudder inputs) is that you nead to be pro active, not reactive, constant small movements so that you are controlling what is happening not reacting, if you are (behind the aircraft) it is usually too late, this is true in real taildraggers and in the sim/game as well. 

 

You need to be in control and anticipating things so you are giving control inputs not reacting to the aircraft.

 

Okay, after a couple consecutive successful landings, I think I got it, and this really helped. Thanks!

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My flying instructor from many years ago (ex Spitfire BoB pilot) would be proud¬†ūüėé

 

Cheers, Dakpilot 

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Full disclosure: I first fell in love with the Mig-3 when flying it in a mode for the 1992 flight simulator SWOTL... for me at the time flying an aircraft with such a weak armament was so counter-intuitive ("What?! No 30mm cannons? Only one 12.7mm machinegun instead of the 'anemic' six of a P-51?") but I tried it, and I discovered a strange pleasure in flying it. I was happily looking forward to it in 2000 when interviews about the original Il-2 were conducted - and I wasn't disappointed.

 

I am also the guy who planned to jokingly use the 'sweetheart photo' mod to add a picture of a Mig-3 into the cockpits of all of my other planes. So I'm willing to take up the cause and defend the honour of the Mig-3!

  

On 12/17/2019 at 10:19 PM, ME-BFMasserME262 said:

Did I forget to mention its slow?

 

Oh, and I make it stall every 5 seconds.

 

1) It is only slow after 1942 with the introduction of the Bf-109G and especially Fw-190... prior to that it can outrun any German aircraft at altitude... and rival them on the deck. Even then it can turn inside these fighters (albeit sustaining such turns causes a loss of altitude).

 

2) The stall characteristics are excellent. Part of this is due to the moment arm created by the inertia of the long nose. One may notice that radial engined aircraft such as the P-47 and Fw-190 tend to have abrupt stall characteristics, whereas inline engined aircraft tend to do better. This is partly because the engine weight extends further forward in the inline engine aircraft and this lowers the ability to quickly generate changes in angle-of-attack. The Mig-3 takes that 'inline effect' and turns it up a notch. With a bit of sensitivity one can learn to nurse the Mig-3 along near its stall limit and recover from spins extremely quickly.

 

3) The aircraft has an excellent roll-rate... although this isn't obvious at first. The high speed roll is only apparent at certain speeds. It is also best generated by increasing the angle of attack slightly before initiating the roll and through using rudder (so you pull back on the stick, apply rudder in the direction you want to roll, and then use your ailerons). The weight of the nose gives a certain amount of inertia that can pull you through the roll and back out into normal flight if you botch it by pulling up too hard and stalling one of the wings... it is kindof a crude form of super-maneuverability when that happens... although at the cost of a lot of energy/altitude. Anyway, this high roll-rate trick (once learned) means that one can use the Fw-190 'switchback' tactic to break away from a more maneuverable enemy with a lower roll rate.

 

4) The aircraft can out-turn German fighters... however it loses energy quickly in a turn... so one has to alternate between periods of relatively straight flying to regain energy and strategically timed turns. It helps to have a good spatial sense. There is actually a lot of airspace which is safe from an enemy fighter... once you factor in their turn radius you can find a lot of safe areas to accelerate for a few seconds that aren't directly on their tail but which also are in places where they wouldn't be able to turn sharply enough to bring their guns to bear.

 

4) The armament has a high rate of fire and is highly concentrated spatially. This allows it to be used very precisely. However, one won't get the one shot kills the 20/30/37mm cannons sometimes produce, and one won't be able to pull the kind of deflection shots that the American fighters specialise in (using heavy machine-guns to produce a wall of steel for the enemy to fly through). The Mig-3's armament works, but, especially against bombers, one needs to be in a position to produce a prolonged burst on the same area of space (in order to hit the same part of the enemy aircraft repeatedly).

 

So the overall conclusion is: It is a complicated, finicky, nimble, and communicative mount. If you treat it as unique and different from other aircraft you can dominate any enemy fighter prior to mid-1942...

 

That said, it is a glass-cannon (without a cannon... if one flies it in a normal configuration), it is easy to lose energy and speed if one isn't careful, it requires truly gaining an advantage over an enemy and it usually requires several bursts to bring them down... it is an aircraft for the chivalrous and for those who exult in flight first - rather than for those who simply want to wrack up kills quickly.

Edited by Avimimus
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I like this plane.  I think I surprised a few pilots last night on  the Wings server.  I kept her high and fast.

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The only Soviet WW2 fighter that looks cool IMO - at least until the Yak-9U comes around.

 

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3 hours ago, CrazyDuck said:

The only Soviet WW2 fighter that looks cool IMO - at least until the Yak-9U comes around.

 

no way. The Mig is by far the sexiest allied (not Soviet only) plane in the current planeset ūüėĄ

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11 minutes ago, ME-BFMasserME262 said:

no way. The Mig is by far the sexiest allied (not Soviet only) plane in the current planeset ūüėĄ

It looks like it was originally designed for the air racing circuit and that someone said "let's add armaments and we'll have a hot interceptor".

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2 hours ago, TRRA15 said:

It looks like it was originally designed for the air racing circuit and that someone said "let's add armaments and we'll have a hot interceptor".

 

Yeah, precisely. Looks as if they had no place to give it some serious guns and forcefully squeezed some MGs into the cowling.

 

Edited by CrazyDuck

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5 hours ago, TRRA15 said:

It looks like it was originally designed for the air racing circuit and that someone said "let's add armaments and we'll have a hot interceptor".

 

Indeed - somewhere between the Caudron C.450, Howard Pete and the Percival Mew Gull.

 

I always thought that the I-16 was a direct interpretation of the Gee Bee Model Z, but with retractable gear.

 

And the La-5 looks like an armed Laird-Turner Meteor (with retracts)

 

We need a pylon course...

 

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On 12/20/2019 at 12:20 AM, Dano said:

Flaps also do not respond as advertised for me, will check my bindings as that's something I've not done.

 

It's because it has a limiter. It start at 0%, that's why your flaps won't open. To increase the limiter, remain a moment on your "flaps down" command, you will see the limiter increasing. Once you get your desirated setting, just use your command again and it'll work. 

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On 12/19/2019 at 8:10 AM, Charon said:

That video is old. The flaps were changed in 4.001.

Quote

43. MiG-3 flaps have been corrected - any change of the flaps limiter position retracts them first and then extends to a new position;

 

The flap limiter now starts at 0, and it's not possible to set the limiter without deploying the flaps. I just now tested this in a QB.

 

This change is strange to me. I find it hard to believe it works 100% as intended. Once the limiter is set to any other than 0 the flaps will always stay open at that position, until the limiter is moved again. There's no way to instantly open or close them. A single tap of the flaps up or down button doesn't do anything. I tested with the default keys so no binding issues. The only way to operate the flaps is to move the limiter. So for example going from 20 degrees to 40 degrees the flaps start at being open at 20 degrees, get fully retracted while moving the limiter, and then open again at 40. It's wonky and slow and has no point or benefits.

 

It'd make 100% sense if the quick tap worked and you could quickly retract them and quickly release them (up to the limiter). I think that's how it's supposed to work. Like in the video.

 

I'm convinced it's buggy right now.

 

And why do the flaps get fully retracted while operating the limiter? Did it work that way in the real MiG? I'm honestly curious.

What happens with my throttle (Warthog) is that while I'm landing I often forget my flap switch at the down position, which in this plane continuously inputs the limiter, which means the flaps are up, so I'm thinking I'm having 100% flaps while in reality I have have zero flaps. Hilarity ensues. Yea, my bad but it works in every other plane...

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5 hours ago, 6./ZG26_Klaus_Mann said:

The Fighting Technique is very simple.

 

image.png.45a77ab546dcfc24253e12b97b34d1ca.png

who would think Michelle Obama was such a good boom'n'zoomer

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57 minutes ago, Hipsu said:

It'd make 100% sense if the quick tap worked and you could quickly retract them and quickly release them (up to the limiter). I think that's how it's supposed to work. Like in the video.

 

I'm convinced it's buggy right now.

 

And why do the flaps get fully retracted while operating the limiter? Did it work that way in the real MiG? I'm honestly curious.

 

One idea I had recently is that the pneumatic system may not be capable of holding the flaps up on its own for long periods. If the pilot of the MiG leaves the handle in the up position, but the limiter extended, it may be that the pneumatic system runs out of pressure and the flaps deploy spontaneously.

 

If that's the case, the only safe way to fly the MiG would be as depicted in game. Once the pilot retracts them, they must also raise the limiter to secure them, then put the handle in neutral.

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"Inspire me to fly the Mig3".

 

Simple, best looking warbird:

 

Spoiler

1280px-MiG-3_at_Mochishche.jpg

 

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She is a looker...not up there with the Mustang, or the Spit, or the Tempest, or the Zero...just not as clean or elegant, but best looking Russian bird.

She's also just fun to fly, which is the primary reason I've always liked this aircraft...also it's MiG...nuff said.

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I got to admit I really could not tolerate flying it in the beginning. Looking at that tiny cute control column just put me off. 
After flying VR I found it more acceptable, do not know if it has changed. Funny how those small things affect my opinion. 
looking away from the fact that I die everytime I fly it. I find it a easy plane to handle. Delightful to fly but those 109 kill me easily

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7 hours ago, Hipsu said:

 

This change is strange to me. I find it hard to believe it works 100% as intended. Once the limiter is set to any other than 0 the flaps will always stay open at that position, until the limiter is moved again. There's no way to instantly open or close them. A single tap of the flaps up or down button doesn't do anything. I tested with the default keys so no binding issues. The only way to operate the flaps is to move the limiter. So for example going from 20 degrees to 40 degrees the flaps start at being open at 20 degrees, get fully retracted while moving the limiter, and then open again at 40. It's wonky and slow and has no point or benefits.

 

It'd make 100% sense if the quick tap worked and you could quickly retract them and quickly release them (up to the limiter). I think that's how it's supposed to work. Like in the video.

 

I'm convinced it's buggy right now.

 

And why do the flaps get fully retracted while operating the limiter? Did it work that way in the real MiG? I'm honestly curious.

What happens with my throttle (Warthog) is that while I'm landing I often forget my flap switch at the down position, which in this plane continuously inputs the limiter, which means the flaps are up, so I'm thinking I'm having 100% flaps while in reality I have have zero flaps. Hilarity ensues. Yea, my bad but it works in every other plane...

This is happening to me also. It was not like this the last time I flow the Mig. Before if you pressed the down command and held it you set the limiter, then pressing the then pressing once released the flaps to the position set. Pressing the up command raised the flaps back to 0%. Don't know when it changed, I have not flowen the Mig for sometime until last night.

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