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^ and if anyone used to imperial units has second thoughts about that (I admit don't know how to check the ambient pressure in quick missions for example), well, there's always quite accurate barometer installed in every US plane in the game - namely MAP gauge, which reads ambient when the airplane stands on the ground without engine cranking :).

 

There doesn't seem to be anything wrong with ambient pressure in the game I'd say (although I don't know how accurately density altitude changes are modelled)

Edited by Art-J
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Well, there goes that theory then...  At least as far as pressure counts.

 

Yet there is still a noticeable difference in flight characteristics between summer and winter flying in the game. Assuming pressure remains constant, the temperature is then the only factor affecting atmospheric density.  

 

It still feels like planes were "tuned" as if a standard day was of -50ºC, and anything hotter detracts from their performance.  At least some planes feel that way, sometimes.... This is a very elusive issue. It might even be tied up with the Infamous Wobbles. 

 

My Programmer-Sense tingles a bit here... But that might be just any programmer's natural tendency to search for the "Grand Unifying Bug", that which when isolated and fixed, shall finally cause all problems in life to disappear.

 

We'll get it, one of these days.... :mda:

 

 

 

 

Edited by 19//Moach
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Game actually models low / high temperature effects on geopotential !

 

For the same QNH you get a given altitude at a lower "height"  in cold weather !

Edited by jcomm-il2

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2 hours ago, 19//Moach said:


 

It still feels like planes were "tuned" as if a standard day was of -50ºC, and anything hotter detracts from their performance.  At least some planes feel that way, sometimes.... This is a very elusive issue. It might even be tied up with the Infamous Wobbles. 

 

 

 

 

Could be by design. Ambient temperature at 30,000 feet is right around -50C according to Google. Coincidentally, or perhaps incidentally, 30,000 feet is just past the P-51D’s high blower critical altitude.

 

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1 hour ago, Zirashi said:

Could be by design. Ambient temperature at 30,000 feet is right around -50C according to Google. Coincidentally, or perhaps incidentally, 30,000 feet is just past the P-51D’s high blower critical altitude.

 

 

Actually, I did mean that as to imply "at sea level" - It feels like planes struggle far more than they should....

 

But that's really it, a "feeling". Just a general sensation of precariousness in flight, too subjective to quantify or measure.   

Yet it affects flying enough to detract seriously from combat performance.

 

 

 

 

Edited by 19//Moach

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What you are describing is exactly what pilots are talking about with density altitude.  This can easily be seen with a density altitude calculator.  If you setup a scenario at 0 ft, 30.10 " Hg, and -5 degrees celcius you get a density altitude of -2674 ft.  The same 0 ft elevation, with altimeter setting of 29.80 and a temp of 35 C, gives you a density altitude of 2483 ft.  So going from the cold to hot day, you aircraft will produce lift and power as if it were 5000ft higher.

 

This is evident in BoX just with some simple speed or climb tests - the aircraft all perform much better on winter maps then on summer maps, at the same altitude and configuration.  In any apples to apples comparison you'll always have less available power in summer conditions, and it will take longer get the same indicated airspeed and your ground speed will be much higher.  Takeoffs, landings, climbing, manuevering etc will all be impacted by this.

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