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Flight model physics question.

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I have noticed something in dogfights that happens to your plane that I don't know the technical term or physics behind it so I will describe it. When your flying level and start manouvering your plane is at its most responsive, but when you start prolonged turning and manouvering such as in dogfights your controls get sluggish and unresponsive and your speed may be high but when you try and force your plane to turn sharper you get a stall effect. You hear the wind woshing and your plane will jerk around before it stalls when trying to turn to sharp. Also if you let go of the stick after doing some manouvering your nose will jerk to a direction off that you are facing when centering. not sure the technical name of this. So how to avoid this and what should I be doing to keep my plane very agile and what I should not be doing that causes this?

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You are incorrect when you say "speed may be high". You can suffer a high-speed stall but mushy controls are when you've lost too much speed.

 

Fundamental rule is to not yank your stick about to its extremes.

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What i have been experiencing and thats about the only odd thing i found when it comes to flight-feeling is the swinging tail phenomenon (for the lack of a better term). This phenomenon occurs quite often when flying relatively slow with a 109 at high altitude. However it can also somewhat be observed in this video at 1:00 witht he PE2: http://ad-und-vision.de/downloads/ . Maybe its supposed to  be like that since i am no pilot. Its just somthing that "fells" a tad odd to me.

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I have noticed something in dogfights that happens to your plane that I don't know the technical term or physics behind it so I will describe it. When your flying level and start manouvering your plane is at its most responsive, but when you start prolonged turning and manouvering such as in dogfights your controls get sluggish and unresponsive and your speed may be high but when you try and force your plane to turn sharper you get a stall effect. You hear the wind woshing and your plane will jerk around before it stalls when trying to turn to sharp. Also if you let go of the stick after doing some manouvering your nose will jerk to a direction off that you are facing when centering. not sure the technical name of this. So how to avoid this and what should I be doing to keep my plane very agile and what I should not be doing that causes this?

 

 

I think you are describing an accelerated stall.  When you start pulling back on the stick the angle of attack increases and the air at some point can't flow smoothly over the wing and that wing stalls, or a part of that wing depending on aircraft design and slipping or skidding in the turn.  This can happen even way above your normal stall speed. Usually one wing stalls first, so you get weird roll and adverse yaw effects.  The planes are heavy, so they have a good bit of inertia once they start doing something you don't want them to do.

 

The solution is not to pull so hard :-)

 

You can do this in even light aircraft without any bank, and maybe visualizing that would help.  Say you are short final and you start your roundout late to level over the runway to bleed off energy.  Maybe you don't want to smash nose first into the ground, so you move the yoke back a little too quickly.  That makes the stall warning horn go off because you just spiked the angle of attack.  The plane is kind of mushing down, although the nose is pointed level-ish.  If you were really violent, you could even stall the airplane, which would be a cause for sorrow.  If the control movement had been more gradual, the plane could have leveled out fine, but trying to make the plane level too fast causes drama and problems.

 

One of the common accident scenarios in aviation is someone turning to the final heading late.  They see they are not going to be lined up when they get to the runway heading, so they increase the angle of bank and pull back on the yoke to keep the nose from falling.  Then there is a stall/spin accident with no room to recover and the results rarely good.

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I think you are describing an accelerated stall.  When you start pulling back on the stick the angle of attack increases and the air at some point can't flow smoothly over the wing and that wing stalls, or a part of that wing depending on aircraft design and slipping or skidding in the turn.  This can happen even way above your normal stall speed. Usually one wing stalls first, so you get weird roll and adverse yaw effects.  The planes are heavy, so they have a good bit of inertia once they start doing something you don't want them to do.

 

The solution is not to pull so hard :-)

 

You can do this in even light aircraft without any bank, and maybe visualizing that would help.  Say you are short final and you start your roundout late to level over the runway to bleed off energy.  Maybe you don't want to smash nose first into the ground, so you move the yoke back a little too quickly.  That makes the stall warning horn go off because you just spiked the angle of attack.  The plane is kind of mushing down, although the nose is pointed level-ish.  If you were really violent, you could even stall the airplane, which would be a cause for sorrow.  If the control movement had been more gradual, the plane could have leveled out fine, but trying to make the plane level too fast causes drama and problems.

 

One of the common accident scenarios in aviation is someone turning to the final heading late.  They see they are not going to be lined up when they get to the runway heading, so they increase the angle of bank and pull back on the yoke to keep the nose from falling.  Then there is a stall/spin accident with no room to recover and the results rarely good.

 

This.

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