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vx111vx111swift

RPM controls

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1 hour ago, vx111vx111swift said:

Which  keys bind the RPM controls for start up on ME262.  

 

That's just not how it works.

 

Pressing E activates the starter which begins spinning the turbine (cold and dry) up to 1,000 RPM.

 

Then you press the igniter on the throttle handle (Shift+E by default, or Right Shift + NumPad 1 or 2 as appropriate) which begins the process of spraying atomized fuel into the combustion chamber and setting it on fire with an electric spark. This increases the rate at which the turbine spins, as well as the engine temperature.

 

When it gets up to about 2,000 RPM, you slowly advance the throttle, which introduces even more fuel into the combustion chamber. You want to increase throttle slowly to avoid a hot start/engine fire...when you get it to about 15%, the switch on the throttle handle will click and you'll also see the RPM needle, which was most of the way around the dial (~3,000 RPM on the inner scale) drop back down to 3,000 RPM or so on the outer scale. You can stop pressing the igniter switch at that point because the fire in the combustion chamber has reached the point of being self-sustaining. The temperature will also settle out somewhere between 450C and the red zone.

 

From there, advancing the throttle will add more fuel to the combustion chamber, causing the turbine to spin at higher RPM and generate more power out of the nozzle at the back. It works fine as long as you don't advance the throttle so quickly that the temperature in the combustion chamber spikes too far into the red (most likely to happen when below 6,000 RPM, which is sort of the sustainable high idle on the ground and the approach power setting in flight) which can cause the engine to catch fire. Likewise, if you retard the throttle too abruptly the temp can drop below 450 C and the fire in the combustion chamber can go out (flameout).

 

That is an awfully long way to say that there is no RPM control, but I hope it helps you understand what is actually happening. For more info:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbojet

Edited by Rekt
Clarification
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This really show A) that people dont know how to search for threads or B) the search function does not work very well

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 Aero Ace --instead  of assisting someone ,you come up with a negative attitude.

Rekt. Thanks for the answer  worked as stated.

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2 hours ago, AeroAce said:

This really show A) that people dont know how to search for threads or B) the search function does not work very well

 

Or (C) proves why there needs to be two options in the settings for advanced or basic engine start up depending on individual preference. 

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2 hours ago, Geronimo553 said:

 

Or (C) proves why there needs to be two options in the settings for advanced or basic engine start up depending on individual preference. 

 

extreme_facepalm-274x285.png

 

 

Have you even looked at the settings?

Does Shift + M ring a bell? 

 

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6 hours ago, vx111vx111swift said:

Rekt. Thanks for the answer  worked as stated.

 

You are quite welcome. Even with the various forum posts and videos showing the steps of the startup procedure, sometimes it helps to zoom out a little and look at what is really happening when you do the various steps.

 

2 hours ago, Bullets said:

 

extreme_facepalm-274x285.png

 

 

Have you even looked at the settings?

Does Shift + M ring a bell? 

 

 

I gather that the issue that most people are facing with this is that the servers they play do not allow the use of that assist.

 

Personally, I like a little bit more engagement with the machine. Would NOT want to do a fully realistic DCS or Prepar3d type startup (I fly too many different planes to stay proficient) but a keystroke or two extra that actually manages parts of the process (like with the 262) is kind of cool. Since it is fundamentally irrelevant to the competitive aspects of air combat, I agree that it should be purely optional on the client side.

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Laugh if you like, but..

 

a. Am I right that the '262 doesn't have manually operable mixture control ?

b. That it also doesn't have radiator control.

 

It's just that I've seen these referred to in other posts.

And the details of what controls are required to be used for each plane I've found elusive thus far..

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2 minutes ago, Zooropa_Fly said:

Laugh if you like, but..

 

a. Am I right that the '262 doesn't have manually operable mixture control ?

b. That it also doesn't have radiator control.

 

It's just that I've seen these referred to in other posts.

And the details of what controls are required to be used for each plane I've found elusive thus far..

 

Correct!

 

The engine is ironically cooled by the air that flows through it...or better stated, it is designed to operate at the temperature that results from an appropriate amount of fuel burning for the particular velocity of air moving through it. Which is why it overheats and can catch fire when fuel is added too quickly. As the RPM increased over 6,000 it can handle the burn much better 😎

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Jets indeed have no mixture controls. They have no radiators either, hence also no shutters, though some (not the 262) have bleeders which serve a different purpose.

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28 minutes ago, danielprates said:

Jets indeed have no mixture controls.

 

It's been a while since I have flown it, but I seem to remember mixture control in the beechcraft 1900D in xplane which is a twin turbo prop from what I can gather, you only leaned the mixture for taxi though. I could very well be mistaken, and if so would appreciate the correction, with a more accurate explanation of what it was I was adjusting.

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56 minutes ago, Herne said:

 

It's been a while since I have flown it, but I seem to remember mixture control in the beechcraft 1900D in xplane which is a twin turbo prop from what I can gather, you only leaned the mixture for taxi though. I could very well be mistaken, and if so would appreciate the correction, with a more accurate explanation of what it was I was adjusting.

 

I think in turboprop engines that is not exactly "mixture" as  we think of it in piston engines. Its a "condition lever", to impact engine torque in some specific situations. I am not an expert on thar but a guy gave a good answer to that here:

 

https://www.airliners.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=729941

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5 minutes ago, danielprates said:

 

I think in turboprop engines that is not exactly "mixture" as  we think of it in piston engines. Its a "condition lever", to impact engine torque in some specific situations. I am not an expert on thar but a guy gave a good answer to that here:

 

https://www.airliners.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=729941

 

really nice find, thank you for this 

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2 hours ago, danielprates said:

Jets indeed have no mixture controls. They have no radiators either, hence also no shutters, though some (not the 262) have bleeders which serve a different purpose.

 

 

A jet is actually 100% controled by fuel mixture (the throttle lever is the mixture lever) that in turn controls the airflow.

 

In a piston enine it is the other way round as the throttle controls the airflow.....

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57 minutes ago, AeroAce said:

 

 

A jet is actually 100% controled by fuel mixture (the throttle lever is the mixture lever) that in turn controls the airflow.

 

In a piston enine it is the other way round as the throttle controls the airflow.....

 

Injecting more fuel into a compressed air chamber to increase thrust could be called "increasing mixture", I guess, in a broader sense. But using the expression "mixture control" as a way to refer to power settings in a jet engine is a novelty. Kudos though, on such a creative, hair-splitting way to create a discussion!

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1 hour ago, AeroAce said:

 

 

A jet is actually 100% controled by fuel mixture (the throttle lever is the mixture lever) that in turn controls the airflow.

 

In a piston enine it is the other way round as the throttle controls the airflow.....

 

Ah, so it's kinda lika an EIII then ?

(without the wing warping)

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Jet engines are notoriously simple, in their own complicated ways....

 

to the pilot, it's almost like switching from a race car to an electric go-kart 

 

Instead of the several different controls for Mix, RPM and whatnot you'd have on a prop plane, you have only one lever that reads "fast <- -> faster"

 

 

all jet engines are aircooled (except maybe some unusual cases like the Harrier), since they are basically huge air pumps - so there are no radiator controls to worry about either...

 

 

that doesn't mean there's nothing to worry about though

 

 

these early jets are temperamental. And quite a lot too.  If you throw around the throttle any quicker than grass grows, they'll either flame out, or go "poof", or both. So you gotta be real gentle and treat them like a lady (in my experience, that means treat it much better than it'll ever treat you)

 

 

and watch your angle of attack -  I was there to see ShamrockOneFive and the guys at FSExpo actually trying out experiments to find out that you can indeed, cause a compressor stall by exceeding maximum slip or angle of attack in the sim - This cuts airflow to the engine and causes it to quit.  Just like you're never supposed to do in the real thing.

 

 

 

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