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RPM controls

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This really show A) that people dont know how to search for threads or B) the search function does not work very well

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 Aero Ace --instead  of assisting someone ,you come up with a negative attitude.

Rekt. Thanks for the answer  worked as stated.

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2 hours ago, AeroAce said:

This really show A) that people dont know how to search for threads or B) the search function does not work very well

 

Or (C) proves why there needs to be two options in the settings for advanced or basic engine start up depending on individual preference. 

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2 hours ago, Geronimo553 said:

 

Or (C) proves why there needs to be two options in the settings for advanced or basic engine start up depending on individual preference. 

 

extreme_facepalm-274x285.png

 

 

Have you even looked at the settings?

Does Shift + M ring a bell? 

 

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Laugh if you like, but..

 

a. Am I right that the '262 doesn't have manually operable mixture control ?

b. That it also doesn't have radiator control.

 

It's just that I've seen these referred to in other posts.

And the details of what controls are required to be used for each plane I've found elusive thus far..

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Jets indeed have no mixture controls. They have no radiators either, hence also no shutters, though some (not the 262) have bleeders which serve a different purpose.

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28 minutes ago, danielprates said:

Jets indeed have no mixture controls.

 

It's been a while since I have flown it, but I seem to remember mixture control in the beechcraft 1900D in xplane which is a twin turbo prop from what I can gather, you only leaned the mixture for taxi though. I could very well be mistaken, and if so would appreciate the correction, with a more accurate explanation of what it was I was adjusting.

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56 minutes ago, Herne said:

 

It's been a while since I have flown it, but I seem to remember mixture control in the beechcraft 1900D in xplane which is a twin turbo prop from what I can gather, you only leaned the mixture for taxi though. I could very well be mistaken, and if so would appreciate the correction, with a more accurate explanation of what it was I was adjusting.

 

I think in turboprop engines that is not exactly "mixture" as  we think of it in piston engines. Its a "condition lever", to impact engine torque in some specific situations. I am not an expert on thar but a guy gave a good answer to that here:

 

https://www.airliners.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=729941

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5 minutes ago, danielprates said:

 

I think in turboprop engines that is not exactly "mixture" as  we think of it in piston engines. Its a "condition lever", to impact engine torque in some specific situations. I am not an expert on thar but a guy gave a good answer to that here:

 

https://www.airliners.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=729941

 

really nice find, thank you for this 

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2 hours ago, danielprates said:

Jets indeed have no mixture controls. They have no radiators either, hence also no shutters, though some (not the 262) have bleeders which serve a different purpose.

 

 

A jet is actually 100% controled by fuel mixture (the throttle lever is the mixture lever) that in turn controls the airflow.

 

In a piston enine it is the other way round as the throttle controls the airflow.....

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57 minutes ago, AeroAce said:

 

 

A jet is actually 100% controled by fuel mixture (the throttle lever is the mixture lever) that in turn controls the airflow.

 

In a piston enine it is the other way round as the throttle controls the airflow.....

 

Injecting more fuel into a compressed air chamber to increase thrust could be called "increasing mixture", I guess, in a broader sense. But using the expression "mixture control" as a way to refer to power settings in a jet engine is a novelty. Kudos though, on such a creative, hair-splitting way to create a discussion!

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1 hour ago, AeroAce said:

 

 

A jet is actually 100% controled by fuel mixture (the throttle lever is the mixture lever) that in turn controls the airflow.

 

In a piston enine it is the other way round as the throttle controls the airflow.....

 

Ah, so it's kinda lika an EIII then ?

(without the wing warping)

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Jet engines are notoriously simple, in their own complicated ways....

 

to the pilot, it's almost like switching from a race car to an electric go-kart 

 

Instead of the several different controls for Mix, RPM and whatnot you'd have on a prop plane, you have only one lever that reads "fast <- -> faster"

 

 

all jet engines are aircooled (except maybe some unusual cases like the Harrier), since they are basically huge air pumps - so there are no radiator controls to worry about either...

 

 

that doesn't mean there's nothing to worry about though

 

 

these early jets are temperamental. And quite a lot too.  If you throw around the throttle any quicker than grass grows, they'll either flame out, or go "poof", or both. So you gotta be real gentle and treat them like a lady (in my experience, that means treat it much better than it'll ever treat you)

 

 

and watch your angle of attack -  I was there to see ShamrockOneFive and the guys at FSExpo actually trying out experiments to find out that you can indeed, cause a compressor stall by exceeding maximum slip or angle of attack in the sim - This cuts airflow to the engine and causes it to quit.  Just like you're never supposed to do in the real thing.

 

 

 

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