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Gaki

About P-47 engine management

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Hi,

 

I'm new to P-47 and not very experienced with CEM in general.

 

I've come across few issues when flying P-47 online. First of all, how does the fuel mixture work on this plane? I know the basics: the higher you fly, the lower the mixture. But on P-47 it seems to be quite weird compared to other manual mixture planes i've flown. When flying the jug the game asks me to drop the mixture like under 500m below 90%, but from there, it doens't seem to care about it at all. I can fly with 85% setting in 6k without the warning signal popping up. Or at least i haven't noticed it once. Does anyone have any specific numbers on what mixture setting should i use at certain altitudes?

 

Another one is the propeller RPM, this one's quite weird for me as well. How close to the redline should I set the RPM when wanting to have maximum acceleration and speed? When flying level with 100% RPM, 100% turbo and 100% power the engine already hits the redline, but the green area is way behind and requires some 70% or so to stay in to. Is this green area the cruise area, and if so, what's the optimal RPM for speed and acceleration? How does the boost affect this? The boost obviously boosts the RPM, so which RPM should I aim with the boost?

 

And for the last, the engine cooling. I read somewhere that I should keep the engine cowl flaps near closed when in combat, and that i should keep the oil cooler open mostly only when climbing, and stick to the lower % when in combat. I usually climb with 100% and reduce it to 40% when in level flight/combat. but for the second time today when i found and enemy in 20,000ft and went after him, i chased him for like 5 minutes with boost on and suddenly my engine just cuts off and i notice the oil warning light. This happened on KOTA server both times - on berloga where we fly lower it hasn't happened once even though i think my engine management should be the same. Any tips on when and how much % oil cooler and cowl flaps should i use?

Thanks, S!

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Good evening,

for every plane in Il-2 there are the specifications. You can click on these, for example, if you go to the map during a flight ("O" default).  There you will also find the power levels for the engine. If I remember correctly, 85% Auto Rich - that means your mixture is automatically rich.  If you want to fly more economical then you should take Auto lean (I think that's 60% or 65% - you can also find it under specifications). I hope that could help you a little. Otherwise I have a video of Requiem here about the P-47. Hopefully this should help you. :)

 

best regards Rico

 

 

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I really wish GB had clickable cockpits. That rocket tube jettison switch could come in handy. 😄

 

I feel like actually having to click some of the switches would be easier than setting up hotkeys for each aircraft function. At least for some of the more specific ones.

 

I'd love to be able to use the weapons safety switch to prevent from accidentally firing my weapons when I don't want too. 😆

 

I took out the P-47 online and was able to climb to 25000 feet while operating the turbo. Proceeded to fly over all the enemy airfields while nobody could touch me. 😉

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P-47 mixture is automatic so you just set it to Auto Rich iirc (I think its around 85-90%)

 

As for power settings I use real world settings.

 

Cruise

-32" @  2325 RPM

Max Continuous

-42" @ 2550 RPM

Military

-52" @ 2700 RPM

WEP

-64" @ 2700 RPM

 

I usually just fly around at max continuous all day until I get into some trouble.

 

I keep cowl flaps closed all the time except when climbing or I need to cool down a bit.

Oil and Intercooler I keep at neutral (50%), I only open up the oil more when I need some cooling.

 

You probably just blew your engine due to going boosted for over 5 min, the way this game modeled engines is faulty so you get gimped engines on aircraft like the P-47. 5 min WEP is the max in-game.

Edited by Legioneod

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sry silly question but what do you mean by these "-32"" values?

 

Thank you for your replies, will watch the video!

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It means "inches of manifold presure"

It is a way of measuring the power setting of the engine. Like boost on english airplanes or ata on german ones.

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I just read about this this called Virtual Button Box.  Haven't tried it yet, but if you want to spend some time learning how to make each 3d button-space for the planes you want to fly, it looks pretty neat.  Basically you create areas on the screen that trigger button presses, and set these areas on the buttons in the cockpit.  These guys are using it for VR hand controllers, but I assume a mouse works just as well.

 

https://www.reddit.com/r/Vive/comments/61nzoz/virtual_button_box_keyboard_emulation_software/

 

 

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23 hours ago, Gaki said:

How close to the redline should I set the RPM when wanting to have maximum acceleration and speed?

 

Best acceleration: 2700 rpm

Best speed: 2600 rpm

 

How to achieve best speed in level flight: 

100% power,

100% turbo supercharger,

50% inlet cowls,

0% outlet cowls,

10-20% oil radiator (depending on temparature),

2600 rpm (it's about 90% I guess),

Full rich, at least at low altitude. Don't know if you gain speed at high alt, but at least it will cool down your engine.

And of course... WEP!

Edited by F/JG300_Faucon
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22 hours ago, Motherbrain said:

I really wish GB had clickable cockpits. That rocket tube jettison switch could come in handy. 😄

 

I feel like actually having to click some of the switches would be easier than setting up hotkeys for each aircraft function. At least for some of the more specific ones.

 

I'd love to be able to use the weapons safety switch to prevent from accidentally firing my weapons when I don't want too. 😆

 

I took out the P-47 online and was able to climb to 25000 feet while operating the turbo. Proceeded to fly over all the enemy airfields while nobody could touch me. 😉

 

You can jettison the rocket launchers. Check settings keys under weapon management. 

 

Regards

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Going max on turbo and throttle and turning the water injection on but leaving the prop at about 2550 RPMs  gives more time before engine go poof and actually results in a higher top speed. Or at least it did last time I tested, there has been a patch or two since then. Try it out offline. You don’t seem to need any cowl flap at all to stay cool enough while the water injection is going.

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17 hours ago, II./JG1_EmerlistDavjack said:

I just read about this this called Virtual Button Box.  Haven't tried it yet, but if you want to spend some time learning how to make each 3d button-space for the planes you want to fly, it looks pretty neat.  Basically you create areas on the screen that trigger button presses, and set these areas on the buttons in the cockpit.  These guys are using it for VR hand controllers, but I assume a mouse works just as well.

 

https://www.reddit.com/r/Vive/comments/61nzoz/virtual_button_box_keyboard_emulation_software/

 

 

 

That's actually quite ingenious. so I guess you kind of have to load a profile to match which plane you are flying ?

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Yeah, each plane needs to be set up independently.  There are guys who do that for every single button in a DCS plane, it must take forever.

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On 4/30/2019 at 1:56 AM, Rattlesnake said:

Going max on turbo and throttle and turning the water injection on but leaving the prop at about 2550 RPMs  gives more time before engine go poof and actually results in a higher top speed. Or at least it did last time I tested, there has been a patch or two since then. Try it out offline. You don’t seem to need any cowl flap at all to stay cool enough while the water injection is going.

 

This is realistic. R-2800s were known for this behaviour in several late war airframes as their power levels started to overtake their prop efficiency.

Edited by Talon_
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On a somewhat related note: Which was the better prop - the late, paddle Curtiss Electric or the Hamiton Standard hydromatic? The latter seems to have been used in most US aircraft, while it was only installed on relatively few Jug blocks.

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15 hours ago, Bremspropeller said:

On a somewhat related note: Which was the better prop - the late, paddle Curtiss Electric or the Hamiton Standard hydromatic? The latter seems to have been used in most US aircraft, while it was only installed on relatively few Jug blocks.

Hamilton had the better performance iirc, gave a few mph speed compared to the Curtis.

 

We dont have either of these in game however. What we have in game is the AO Smith, I'm not sure how it performed compared to the Curtis Electric.

Edited by Legioneod
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Was there a particular reason why only relatively few hydromatics went on to Jugs?

Might have been the demand from other airframes, where the Hamilton was used exclusively...

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On 5/1/2019 at 2:39 AM, Talon_ said:

 

This is realistic. R-2800s were known for this behaviour in several late war airframes as their power levels started to overtake their prop efficiency.

Would a setting like this reduce your acceleration or climb though? There must be a tradeoff of some kind.

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2 hours ago, RedKestrel said:

Would a setting like this reduce your acceleration or climb though? There must be a tradeoff of some kind.

 

I believe the commonly held wisdom is that 88% RPM gives you more speed, while 100% gives you more acceleration (which I imagine is better when turning, climbing, etc).

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Stick to rpm settings.  % is easy but it is good to learen instruments and watch them.

 

Once I mapped turbo control - it is relatively easy to get going in the P47.  Love the sound of the turbo too but boy - is this plane huge for a single seater.  Might get up the gumption to test her out against adversaries soon. Still familierising with the plane though.  Outer cowlings - shut, inner half open and oil cooler 1 notch on the lever aka around 20%😁

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13 minutes ago, blitze said:

Stick to rpm settings.  % is easy but it is good to learen instruments and watch them.

 

Once I mapped turbo control - it is relatively easy to get going in the P47.  Love the sound of the turbo too but boy - is this plane huge for a single seater.  Might get up the gumption to test her out against adversaries soon. Still familierising with the plane though.  Outer cowlings - shut, inner half open and oil cooler 1 notch on the lever aka around 20%😁

Yes, practice reading the dash panel. 

 

On most American planes in the game, the important gauges - manifold pressure, RPM, etc.  have safety markers if you zoom in. The only real complication for the P-47 is knowing how to get the most out of the turbo. 

On German fighters (109F series onward, 190s, 110s) it's mostly automated and you just need to check the specs tab in the map screen for ATA settings.

I haven't flown the Mc.202 (Italian) in awhile, so I don't recall.  

The Russian planes need a little more study of the specifications but, once you get them, you can fly just as fast as if you were running full-out but, still have a cooler engine and extra power to use in emergency.

 

A lot of veteran players will instruct new players with % because it's the easiest way to convey the basics of not breaking the engine.  It doesn't always mean it's the most efficient.  

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48 minutes ago, =AVG77=Mobile_BBQ said:

A lot of veteran players will instruct new players with % because it's the easiest way to convey the basics of not breaking the engine.  It doesn't always mean it's the most efficient.

 

That's why I mentioned using gauges.  Intimidating but the Requiem videos cover each planes cockpit well and as you mentioned the German planes from 109 F up are automated, whilst American and Brit planes have colour markings to help id where to be on the gauges.  Only the VVS planes you need to remember but most of them can be flown flat out.  Just have to keep your eye on the engine temp and allow the planes engine to cool down when you feel it is safe to do so.

 

Not sure about the Macchi myself as I haven't flown it much - yet

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11 hours ago, Bremspropeller said:

Was there a particular reason why only relatively few hydromatics went on to Jugs?

Might have been the demand from other airframes, where the Hamilton was used exclusively...

 

No idea but it may have been due to logistics. From my understanding only Farmingdale (Designation RE) fitted P-47s with the Hamilton, they switched to the Curtis Electric with the D-28 and stopped using the Hamilton.

 

The only reason I can see for the switch is due to logistics and maintenance concerns. It's alot easier to manage one type of prop than to have to have multiple types with differing mechanisms.

 

Another result of Farmingdale switching to the Curtis electric is they no longer used different block numbers for the same exact aircraft.

For example the D-22 and D-23 were exactly the same aircraft, the only difference was that the D-22 was produced at farmingdale and had the Hamilton and the D-23 was produced at Evansville and had the Curtis electric. It's the same situation for the D-25 and D-26.

Once farmingdale switched to the Curtis you no longer see the different block designations for the same aircraft.

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