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Every time I fly the Stuka I get engine failure!keeps telling me don't use combat speed when I am at only %50 throttle,then tells me speed to low.Cannot even keep up with rest of Stukas,seems fine for half way to target then starts all the crap,Radiator settings are fine.

 

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Just now, canuk2rogerthat said:

Every time I fly the Stuka I get engine failure!keeps telling me don't use combat speed when I am at only %50 throttle,then tells me speed to low.Cannot even keep up with rest of Stukas,seems fine for half way to target then starts all the crap,Radiator settings are fine.

 

How´s your RPM setting?

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It’s been a while since I’ve flown it but if I remember I cruise at 1.1ata @ 2200 rpm. It’s real easy to blow up if you don’t pay attention

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That's right, the game flashes the "emergency mode" if you have either too high RPM as well as too high MP. The best thing is to read the engine's specs but if you does not have the time, fiddling with both MP and RPM will eventually get you below the red line.

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Yep, RPM is very important to monitor.

 

Some planes like the Bf-109 have automatic RPM, but others like the Stuka require manual input.

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Posted (edited)
On 4/14/2019 at 2:22 PM, canuk2rogerthat said:

Every time I fly the Stuka I get engine failure!keeps telling me don't use combat speed when I am at only %50 throttle,then tells me speed to low.Cannot even keep up with rest of Stukas,seems fine for half way to target then starts all the crap,Radiator settings are fine.

 

Welcome to the club. It’s what got me started using the automatic engine and coolant management systems.quite a while back. But I soon figured flying a plane as in real life is a lot more than simply yanking the throttle back and forth along with the stick/control column. I studied each aircrafts engine parameters first before starting up flying quick combat solo and parked. Also made a note of engine operating ranges as well (though usually marked via the gauges anyways). Take note of each of the three engine operating notes for normal, combat and emergency flight. In the Stuka if I recall correctly there is an engine mode termed as “Climb Power” or something similar (you get the idea though). Also look at the aircraft’s notes as well since there may be some valuable information in regards to engine management to be gleamed from here as well.

 

One of the reasons I went and bought the CH Quadrant was to be able to easily adjust the engine for throttle, mixture and prop (especially for flying in VR where everything is done by feel). Plus the eight switches beneath helped for mapping engines 1 and 2 for such things as inlet and outlet cowls (like in the A-20), then oil radiator cowlings and then water radiator cowlings (I have all mine mapped the same, up opens then and down closes them  what ever degree I desire). I have the Quadrant mapped for the standard left to right throttles, mixtures then props.

 

So yeah, like others have said it’s not only throttle input but also other things such as prop a well. You have to watch engine RPM’s but can’t neglect also watching your manifold pressure (ATA). You’ll find it much more gratifying as you are flying manually without using the automated systems boxes checked in the menu and instead controlling  exactly what is going on manually through your various inputs. Once you’ve learned to tame your RPM’s, ATA and coolant levels you're set to jump into any bird and successfully bring her home in one piece (engine-wise that is)!

 

Some say the P-40E is like the Stuka in terms of engine management as they both walk a fine line when it comes to forgiveness. But once I learned to watch and manage my inputs accordingly, I’ve never had a power plant failure since. When it comes to engine and cooling systems I must say for me personally I give a thumbs up to the German machines in this category due to many of their automated systems. The American planes seem to require a lot more “babysitting” when it comes to the various engine and cooling inputs, but just my opinion. There’s something about managing all those inputs though that just makes it more gratifying but from a combat pilots perspective I guess the less dinking around with manual engine management systems the better off you are though I suppose IRL it just becomes second nature.  It definitely keeps you busier though!

 

As a helper, you may want to until you get used to things trying hitting the “H” key to bring up your HUD display. It can help you get used to your settings via a visual feedback. For instance, it’ll let you know when you’ve reached combat power or emergency power as well. It’ll also clue you in when you’ve got an engine overheat situation, or vice-versa. It’s just an additional visual until you get used to the parameters and watching the gauges accordingly. I don’t like using it myself but since I don’t understand German or Russian at times I’ll have it on in order to better understand the situational awareness via radio chatter in career mode. I’ve also used it during testing of engine limitations. For instance, recently I had set the autopilot for straight and level flight then popped on the HUD to see exactly how far I can stress the Me 109 G-4 in emergency mode since I was about to begin a new career in one. Timing it while watching the HUD for tech info I managed to pull a full 2 minutes and 15 seconds out of it before the whole thing sh*t the bed, exceeding the rating by quite a bit.

 

So yeah, it just takes practice like everything else but highly worth it as it really gives you much more satisfaction knowing your pulling off what those pilots did back then (okay, it’s not the real thing but I think it’s safe to say it’s the closest most of us will get to actually piloting these historic aircraft) and if nothing else gives you a greater appreciation for all the different aircraft and what’s involved in flying each of them.

 

Stick with it. In the end it’s very well worth it and hey, it’s a lot cheaper than the real deal if things go south!

 

Edited by BornToBattle

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You're on a fool's errand. Take the FW-190 F-8 instead, load up an SC1000, and you're good to go. You'll be done and home before the Stukas have even started trying to eat all of Uncle Joe's ammo. 

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I enjoy flying the Stuka for sightseeing but that's all it's good for. It climbs like a gut-shot rhino and is slow all the time, little more than fun-fodder for enemy pilots. Fortunately there are numerous other planes that do its job way better AND can turn into fighters after dropping their load. :)

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2 hours ago, Uffz-Prien said:

I enjoy flying the Stuka for sightseeing but that's all it's good for. It climbs like a gut-shot rhino and is slow all the time, little more than fun-fodder for enemy pilots. Fortunately there are numerous other planes that do its job way better AND can turn into fighters after dropping their load. :)

 

Heresy! The Stuka is a wonderful machine. Sturdy, excellent gunner, nigh unbreakable in a dive, air brakes and a SIREN. Great flexibility of loadouts, pinpoint accurate, a pleasure to fly, surprisingly potent short-term turnrate, lots of ammo and fuel... I could go on. Slow as a horse-drawn carriage, I'll grant you, but unless you're talking about really long distances, the Stuka remains a potent bomber. 

...but I may be in the minority here.

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14 minutes ago, Luftschiff said:

 

Heresy! The Stuka is a wonderful machine. Sturdy, excellent gunner, nigh unbreakable in a dive, air brakes and a SIREN. Great flexibility of loadouts, pinpoint accurate, a pleasure to fly, surprisingly potent short-term turnrate, lots of ammo and fuel... I could go on. Slow as a horse-drawn carriage, I'll grant you, but unless you're talking about really long distances, the Stuka remains a potent bomber. 

...but I may be in the minority here.

But that Jumo 211 is just awful, it's like having a battery operated hand fan for an engine.

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Just now, Melonfish said:

But that Jumo 211 is just awful, it's like having a battery operated hand fan for an engine.

 

No arguments there, it's a tugboat, but I'm used to flying bomber sorties in WW1 kites that would look enviously at a hand fan.

Don't insult her potency though!

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13 minutes ago, Melonfish said:

But that Jumo 211 is just awful, it's like having a battery operated hand fan for an engine.

Actually no. It is a BIG heavy plane...

But afther you drop the load, it can turn with fighters of the same era, i have done it against human laggs p40 and p39

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I wanted to introduce my brother to the joy of a dive attack from high altitude with the siren screaming (him in the gunner's seat) but after the fifth attempt (being shot down before we could reach the target) we gave up.

"Never mind, the 110 is fun too..."

😂

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I'm sure there was at least one German wartime engineer who looked at the Condor and thought, "I bet I could fit dive brakes to that."

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1 hour ago, ruby_monkey said:

I'm sure there was at least one German wartime engineer who looked at the Condor and thought, "I bet I could fit dive brakes to that."

 

Don't bring the poor Greif into this :(

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Posted (edited)

While it is true there are many other planes that can “do the job” perhaps more effectively in terms of power, the OP wasn’t wishing to pit one machine against another but wanted to learn more about managing the Stuka’s “glass” engine. The Stuka, like it or not, was a very predominant aircraft and as such the devs I think did a wonderful job as always in mastering its likeness in terms of both graphics and flight model.

 

I look at each aircraft as a chance to fly (especially in VR) something historical, regardless of its strengths or weaknesses and as such a chance to appreciate its shortcomings as all part of what it was like to fly the real deal. In fact, given how one must master as Luftschiff so aptly said this “Slow as a horse drawn carriage...” (which is so true especially when loaded out) it adds - for me - a sense of accomplishment when you can pull off your mission flight WITHOUT blowing the Jumo into hundreds of fragments all the while learning patience and being on top of engine management skills.

 

Yeah, he could fly “this or that” and be back at base and had his coffee, read the daily news reports and kicked the tires a few times in his better equipped hot rod before the Stuka even reached altitude but then he’d be passing over one of the more interesting historically significant and challenging temperamental aircraft that 1C worked so hard on producing. 

Edited by BornToBattle
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The Ju-87 is really fun.  It doesn't have the contact altimeter working but it's still fun.  It's a real challenge to be successful.  The dive bomb attack kicks ass.  It's slow, not very maneuverable in A to A combat and has a somewhat temperamental power plant, but can be managed with a little practice and knowing how it works.  It's got a neet little bomb window, air brakes and a siren.  You can mount BK 3.7's on the wings.  What's not to love? 

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I want the Stuka Rudel describes in his book. Him and the boys must have had it in the workshop, hot-rodding it. 😁

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Posted (edited)

Simply use 100% throttle and rpm 100% for take off
                      87% throttle, rpm and 100% rads for climbing(30 min)
                      77% rpm and throttle for "resting" the engine

Edited by -[HRAF]BubiHUN
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