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ladlon

Absolutely can't control the 190...

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, ladlon said:

Yep, yep and yep...  As I said, I am very careful... which makes the sudden spins and non-responsiveness all the more unusual (and frustrating).

 

Quite strange... I will probably repeat others but: 

 

Check pitch is in auto, or manual but fine pitch (100%).

Check your differiencial brakes separatly, left and right (look at the pedals). 

Make sure you're taxiing very slowly with 1000-1200 rpm max, and keep using brakes all the time. German aircrafts have no controlled tailwheel so you have no other choice. Consider rudder is useless (in fact, it is almost useless).

 

As I said, it's important to taxi veeeryyyyy slowly due to the unrealistic uneficiency of brakes (that's why you can loose control during a turn even when you are very careful). It's not rare that my aircraft spin into a 180° or more while I'm litteraly standing up on the brakes. 

 

 

EDIT: And I should add that Fw190 is hard to taxi with tailwheel unlocked.

Edited by F/JG300_Faucon

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We definitely need a video of this I think to try and help. Or at least record a track and send us the file so we can watch what you're doing.

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15 hours ago, ladlon said:

I can confirm right now that the tail was locking.

 

Just to confirm, is it locking or locked? 

 

I also concur, a video would be helpful, make sure to show your controls in the cockpit while taxiing. 

 

 

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I tried again last night (using differential).

 

One very frustrating aspect, is that (apparently) differential is a must (...I usually use rudders, and don't have differential mapped on my hotas, as I don't have physical rudders... I have a X52Pro).  And, using the keyboard for differential doesn't really work, as you really need both hands on the hotas (one for throttle, the other for rudder/aileron, etc).  However, the company that made this sim decided not to allow modifiers to be used to give players the ability to double/triple up the effective number of buttons on their hotas (...apparently because it would 'confuse' new players somehow... even though it isn't manditory to use, and isn't a difficult concept).

 

There's already way too many things to map onto a non-modifier using hotas system, so adding differential on one of the few 4/8 way knobs I have means other critical controls are left with no buttons to assign them to.  I can't understand why modifiers aren't allowed (because they are considered too difficult/confusing to casual players), despite other truly complex/difficult things, like complex engine management being left in.  The fact that something is in/allowed doesn't make a sim more 'difficult', as long as it's not forced on them (which would be the case with modifiers, and would be optional, just like engine management, advanced physics, and the turning off of helpers).

 

I temporarily mapped differential on one of the 4 ways, and although it 'helped' me to steer (with difficulty), I was still spinning out, or finding the plane would get into a mode where full (say) right differential braking would only serve to keep the plane moving forward (as opposed to right).  Many times, it would seemingly ignore differential, and turn (when you want to stay straight).  In some cases, it seems RUDDER was what was needed, or a combo of it and differential... and sometimes neither seemed to have any affect.

 

As far as speed, I found my plane often didn't even move unless I went past 75% throttle... and even going excrutiatingly slow, the plane would often go into a ridiculously fast 360 spin (and again, often not respond to full brakes).

 

The rotation seemed to be along one wheel... again, as if one wheel had it's differential applied full... yet no braking was being applied.  I verified the state of the physical (in game) brake pedals (both when I applied them, when they were released, and when I was applying only one side)... All that checked out.

 

I also checked the dead zones and looked if there was any input noise... everything good.  And, no conflicting mappings.

 

I watched the tail wheel, and found nothing seemingly unusual.  I did find that I couldn't seem to lock it manually (using a mapped key), despite the wheel (seemingly) being straight.  It would lock, though, when I pulled back on the stick.  So, I'm not sure why the manual lock toggle wasn't happening (....or at least, it wasn't triggering a text confirmation of the action... since there's nothing visual to see on the wheel itself when it locks, other than it not rotating).

 

I've never recorded a session, so I'll have to look into that.

 

I also found, last night, that my planes were seemingly not getting enough power... and would reach the end of the runway and JUST be able to lift off (sometimes) with excessive yoke pull...  I suspect it's due to the constant tapping of the differential this time around, which surely bleeds off the speed (... I had to constantly be tapping, as the plane never seemed to stabalize and just go straight).  The bombers were the worst, and would end up just fast rolling through the countryside.

 

I'm wondering if some aspect is not auto-managing... like prop pitch or something.  I have it set to do the engine management, prop and even the throttle protection... yet I'm starting to suspect some critical factor/setting is not being applied, resulting in a serious lack of takeoff power/speed.  I have the flaps applied, and trimmed for takeoff.

 

What I did notice, on one of the last attempts, is that the plane was (automatically) trimmed severely nose down (not nose up).  I found that odd, although I won't insist I'm an expert in any way.  I would think it would either be neutral or nose up, not severely nose down... unless that's done to motivate the tail wheel from rising off the ground?

 

All I know, is that WITH differential tapping (which, in itself, was often not enough to prevent the plane from either going into it's 360 spin, or to suddenly seemingly stop responding to differential steering), too much speed was getting bled out from takeoff, and I would reach the end of the runway with no lift at all, or JUST managed to pull up with aggressive yoke pulling.  Something definitely wrong.

 

I'll see what I can do about a vid.  I'm also going to go through the specific plane guides (BoS manual), to see if there's some difference between what they say vs the CloD requirements/suggestions... The two sims feel DRASTICALLY different as far as plane performance, even though I know they shouldn't.

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I have the same joystick as you and I have the brakes mapped to the T1, T2, T3, toggles. T1 for Left, T2 for Both, T3 for right. It works fine and I have no problem controlling the 190 with these. If you are having trouble with this one, just wait till you try the HS-129B-2! The same method works for this too, though it is very sensitive.

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Thanks for the advice.  I had (temporarily) mapped them to the left and right directions of the top 4 way on the stick (above the C button), which allows me to keep my hand around the stick to do additional steering.  If I were to map it onto the T switches, it's pretty much like having it on the keyboard, and has the issue of you having to let go of the stick.

 

There must be something different between BoX and CloD (or any of my other sims) which I am failing to recognize.  It's virtually uncontrollable for me, despite all the care I take.  It'll (sort of) work for a moment, but then the response completely changes (no response, or exaggerated response, or even sometimes seemingly reverse response).  Sometimes, the differential will only serve to straighten the plane, but is not strong enough to actually turn it in the direction I'm applying.... almost like it's fighting against an apposing trim.

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17 minutes ago, ladlon said:

I watched the tail wheel, and found nothing seemingly unusual.  I did find that I couldn't seem to lock it manually (using a mapped key), despite the wheel (seemingly) being straight.  It would lock, though, when I pulled back on the stick.  So, I'm not sure why the manual lock toggle wasn't happening (....or at least, it wasn't triggering a text confirmation of the action... since there's nothing visual to see on the wheel itself when it locks, other than it not rotating). 

 

The tailwheel lock on the Fw-190 does not toggle on/off and there is no tailwheel lock switch. You have to pull the stick back and hold it back. If you release the stick, the tailwheel lock will release. I truly think this is most likely your problem.

 

Pull the stick back until the tailwheel is locked, hold it back, and taxi using rudder and differential braking. On takeoff, keep the stick pulled back until about 100kph, then let the tail come up.

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Yep, I'm doing the pullback thing, too....

 

In addition, I mapped the tailwheel toggle to a button on the X52Pro... but didn't realize that the 190 didn't have that feature... so I wasn't sure if the lack of a text prompt when I activated it was because something wasn't working, the conditions weren't right, or... as the case actually is... that plane doesn't have that feature.

 

I'll give it yet another go tonight.

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Posted (edited)

Just map all your brakes like you do for Russian planes.  One button to activate then rudder control for the differential steering brakes.  Hold down the brake button, apply right rudder and the right brake comes on the left turns off, and vice versa, just hold the button and both brakes work.  It's how I run brakes on every plane in the game since the brake potentiometers on my CH pedals went all spikey.

Edited by BlitzPig_EL

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Hi.  So, are you saying you are essentially creating a modifier ('shift') key that you apply along with rudder to 'shift' the rudder controls into acting as differential ( as opposed to rudder)?

 

I was under the impression that BoX doesn't allow modifiers.

 

Or, are you saying, that you are applying 'regular' brakes (both wheels), but also using the rudder (AS a rudder)?

 

 

I also have the 'regular' brake mapped to a key on the hotas, and I have the rudder assigned to my yoke twist (since I don't have physical rudder pedal controls).  I USUALLY use rudder to ground steer (and that has worked on all other sims/planes)... and never used differential (...nothing against it.. I just never had any buttons left on the hotas to map them!).

 

 

I'm wondering something, now....  If BoX allows you to double map things (...I have to verify that...), then could I map the yoke twist to both the rudder AND the differential?  In the air, the application of the differential would (I assume) be irrelevant and have no affect (which is good)... and on the ground, you would then be applying both the rudder and differential... which I generally do now anyway, as just differential sometimes doesn't seem to be enough, and needs rudder.  If rudder is irrelevant on the ground, then the double map is harmless there (as it is in the air)... so, that would give you the benefit of rudder in the air, and differential on the ground, both tied to the same (yoke twist) mapping.  I have to try that.  If that works, that would be excellent (...otherwise, I WOULD normally have a modifier button I'd press to change the yoke twist from rudder to differential control..... IF BoX would let you use modifiers, which (frustratingly) it doesn't....

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Posted (edited)

How do you set up the brakes on Yaks?   Let's start there.

 

Edited by BlitzPig_EL

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Thanks for this thread. I was having the same dizzying experience. The weekend's here - time to try again with new found knowledge. 🙂

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There is no need to overthink the key mapping. When you apply breaks, it breaks both wheels. When you apply brakes to both wheels, then engage the rudder, the game automatically switches to differential breaking.

 

Also watch your in-cockpit break pedals. That should give it away if there is any erroneous differential breaking as you suspect.

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@BlitzPig_EL  Was that direccted to me?  I haven't even flown any of the Russian planes.  I just got BoK a few days ago.  Previous to that, I've been flying CloD, and really just fly the German ones.  I have the rudder mapped to the twist of the yoke (X52Pro), and the (regular) brake mapped to a button on the throttle.  Up to now, I've done fine with steering using rudder and/or aileron.  BoK seems definitely more twitchy trying to keep the plane straight on the ground, compared to CloD... and actually taxing (meaning having to turn to face specific directions) has been a downright nightmare (very random, and sometimes overracting, and sometimes seemingly not even responding.  I'd swear that the left wheel differential brake is randomly applying (but visually, I see that the pedal is NOT engaged).  I'm puzzled to see, too, that the planes seem to feel 'stuck in the dirt' unless I go more than 75% throttle.  That's why I recently was pondering if maybe the prop pitch is set wrong... but I have all that on auto (prop, engine management).

 

@Cpt_Cool  Ya, that's what I have always assumed for years (whether that was right or wrong, I didn't know for sure!).  I've always just had regular breaks (both wheels) mapped to a button, and then steered with the rudder.  Always worked for me.  I wasn't aware (for sure) that the sim actually switched over to differential when applying regular brakes and using the rudder... I just knew it worked.  I generally assumed it still treated it as both wheels braking, but the rudder (acting AS a rudder) did work to steer.  Last night, I watched the pedals, and it didn't seem like it was doing differential... just rudder (when I would brake and use the rudder).  But, last night, I then also mapped differential to two positions of the 4 way POV knob.  So, I'll have to try regular brakes again, and verify that once more.

 

Yep, very puzzling, and frustrating.  I totally get (am and very used to) prop torque and all that... But the 190 in BoK just seems complete anarchy... or like something is wrong (joystick noise, conflicting mapping, some other factor not set properly... something).  I have to really throttle just to get it to 'get out of the dirt', and then despite walking on eggshells, it suddenly spins like the tail was hit by a passing truck (and the brakes don't seem to help stop it spinning).

 

I'll get it... at some point.  There's just something wrong, and I haven't sorted it out.  The autopilot can handle it, so a human should be able to as well.  Visual controls (so far) are not indicating anything unusual.  It's like invisible forces acting on it.  I'd suspect wind... if there were any!

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If you are needing to run 75% to get rolling, that seems unusual. Tried A5 tonight and mine started to roll well by 50%. However this was on summer stalingrad map.

The thing you could try if needing 75% is setting prop pitch to manual before raising throttle. That should 'fix' pitch to the 12:30 position on indicator, which ought to give you finer control. It does suggest doing this is the 190 specs page.  Lock tail wheel, lock prop pitch, raise throttle to 40% see you roll straight.

Just dont forget to change it back before rolling on take off - easy to blow engine through over rev if dont notice. Whilst the 190 is sensitive, I do not have many problems with it, but I do have rudder pedals and individual l-R brakes for birds that use it.

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Ya, that's one of the next things I want to check.  Prop pitch (or something to do with the RPMs and/or engine management) seems like it MIGHT be a factor.

 

I have engine management, radiators, pitch... all that stuff, set to auto... so, I assumed everything would be (dynamically) adjusted as needed... but, as you yourself say, something is unusual.

 

I personally don't want to deal with engine managment (despite liking to watch gauges, push buttons, etc)... at least just yet.  I still have my hands full dealing with combat and such.  Currently, having to monitor and adjust things like pitch and radiators is just too much for me to deal with at this point.  I'm not aware of whether you can turn management on/off live... or if it's just set on/off before the mission (options), and it's then locked.  If you can, then ya, I'd be fine with manually setting things up, then manually setting them back after takeoff and then switching to auto (...or switching to auto after takeoff, as I would assume that would then switch things back the way they should be anyway).

 

I'm going through the Chuck guides as well, seeing the specifics about taxiing and takeoff.

 

Overall, I'm finding BoX to be far more 'torque pulling' than CloD... and far less predictable/controllable as far as taxiing.

 

I've got a few things I want to try and look into tonight...

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57 minutes ago, ladlon said:

I'm not aware of whether you can turn management on/off live... or if it's just set on/off before the mission (options), and it's then locked

 

Try setting the auto rads and auto engine management on in the Realism Options, then look at the key bindings and search for the auto rads and engine management toggle function. I believe it should be under Plane Engine Controls. Ideally this ought to give you the opportunity to turn off auto mode for engine and rads so you could play with it; then turn it back on if you feel like handing it back off to auto mode. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

If there is a toggle command, that would be great!

 

That would solve it.  Heck, I'd like to do engine management while travelling (just not during combat!).

 

I'll look into that.  Thanks, MarderIV.

 

 

 

From post after this:

6 minutes ago, Venturi said:

The major problem is, the CG seems to be ahead of the front wheels on most planes... ps. The cg should not be ahead of the wheels, when the airplane is resting on its tail...

 

Hi, Venturi.  You mean center of gravity, right?  I never really noticed, but ya, I'd imagine the CG would shift back (to whatever degree) with the yoke pulled back.

 

Obviously, most other people are not having this issue I'm seeing (although we do have a few saying they are), and I've always been pretty sure it's just something I'm not realizing, or something not being set right... or maybe even some glitch or something.  I really can't say, but I would imagine a lot of people would be screaming if they were all experiencing the same thing, as it's crazy!  So, that's the good news...  It's just something on my side.  I just have to figure out what it is.  Got lots to try out in the next sessions.

Edited by ladlon

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I was curious so have it a test today and didn't have any real problems. @ about 18% throttle i was able to keep it straight with rudder, but would back down to %15 if it felt was getting too fast, tap o or r brake to turn more sharply.

 

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Yep, all the more reason I'm convinced that something is wrong on my side... either in my understanding, my setup, my hardware... or just the alignment of the universe.

 

Most people are having no problem, so I can only assume that there's no issue with the sim, and it's just something on my side.

 

I'm actually going to be jumping in the sim shortly, so I'll be trying a bunch of things.

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Just retried on kuban summer from tuapse - rolled forward easily at 25%, and then 15-18% to just keep slow annd steady.

fw190 engine management is almost non existent. Merely throttle, and radiator. Everything else works through the kommandogerat - auto engine system. So just to try if its a hardware thing, have autorads set as someone has suggested. Then spawn at Tuapse in south Kuban on coast, summer. It will roll forwards at 25% throttle with pitch set to manual. You dont have to control the pitch from there unless you want to t/o - it will just stay at the lowest prop pitch level. Just see if you can taxi like it - pull throttle down to 15-20% and it will move pretty slow and steady. It may well be the auto engine mangement setting you prefer is causing the sensitivity problem - (unless you have a single brake reversed - but that would have been visible when you check the brake peddles before).

Problem you may find here is a lot of us have possibly little to no experience of setting in game auto engine management. You should not be needing 75% throttle to get mobile.

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Here's a quick video I made showing how it's really rather simple. I basically taxied with the tail-wheel locked the entire time, I looped it at the end because I let go of the stick which unlocked the tail-wheel while I was on the toe break.

 

You just need to make sure the tail-wheel is locked correctly and the plane should basically just go straight. If you aren't, then you aren't locking the tail-wheel, the tail-wheel won't lock unless you are going straight. Again you need to pull the stick towards you and hold it there to maintain the lock. If you let go it unlocks immediately, if you do this while braking it will loop.

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

There's the clue right there really, that the plane can do a 360 with zero provocation (a real one wouldn't do that under the same conditions). The ground handling is poor and some peoples set-ups seem to suffer it more than others (even the exact same pieces of hardware with same drivers).

IL2 is far from the worst though.

Edited by Uffz-Prien

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17 hours ago, ladlon said:

If I were to map it onto the T switches, it's pretty much like having it on the keyboard, and has the issue of you having to let go of the stick.

No it doesn't? I'm able to handle the stick in my right hand while using the toggles with my left. What's the problem there? Simples!

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8 hours ago, Uffz-Prien said:

There's the clue right there really, that the plane can do a 360 with zero provocation (a real one wouldn't do that under the same conditions). The ground handling is poor and some peoples set-ups seem to suffer it more than others (even the exact same pieces of hardware with same drivers).

IL2 is far from the worst though.

To be fair I was on the right toe brake and unlocked the tail wheel at decent speed. The rear does seem to be quite spin happy, I feel like it's almost because the tailwheel isn't weighed down enough, maybe the prop wash is enough to lift it off the ground.

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3 minutes ago, JonRedcorn said:

To be fair I was on the right toe brake and unlocked the tail wheel at decent speed. The rear does seem to be quite spin happy, I feel like it's almost because the tailwheel isn't weighed down enough, maybe the prop wash is enough to lift it off the ground.


Ah, you did provoke it then. Lol.

The odd thing I've noticed with most if not all the planes is the tail is good until it hits a 'break point', at which it goes from realistic to cartoon crazy. It doesn't take a huge amount of practice to learn how to finesse them but a moment's inattention can bite.

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Just now, Uffz-Prien said:


Ah, you did provoke it then. Lol.

The odd thing I've noticed with most if not all the planes is the tail is good until it hits a 'break point', at which it goes from realistic to cartoon crazy. It doesn't take a huge amount of practice to learn how to finesse them but a moment's inattention can bite.

Really it's just a pretty dumb idea if you ask me to have the tail wheel controlled by the rearward stick pressure, makes everything far harder than it has to be. My assumption in this thread is the guys not holding the tail wheel lock. The planes not hard to taxi, it's not that hard to do anything in really. Never unlock the tailwheel while on the brakes and you should be ace.

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I got used to holding the stick back as a way of braking the WW1 kites, so it's not so alien for me. But I guess it proves ground-loops, even on wide-track carts, was an issue.

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Posted (edited)

No it proves that ground loops on even wide track carts are an issue in this sim.  The ground handling behavior has been dubious at best since day one of this series, and while it is somewhat better than it was initially, it is still not "there" yet.

 

Just keep telling yourself, harder is more real...  Even when it isn't.

Edited by BlitzPig_EL

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11 minutes ago, BlitzPig_EL said:

No it proves that ground loops on even wide track carts are an issue in this sim.  The ground handling behavior has been dubious at best since day one of this series, and while it is somewhat better than it was initially, it is still not "there" yet.

 

Just keep telling yourself, harder is more real...  Even when it isn't.

 

Yes, I mentioned that in an earlier post. Hopefully there'll still be a market for air sims when quantum computers are common-place and everything can be hyper-realistically modelled. :)

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It can be done right now.  This isn't rocket science.  It's basic aircraft behavior and the only reason it's the way it is, is because the devs think this is how it should be.  Simple as that.

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It's the same in any genre of computer games... this flight sim game is no different. It can never be as realistic as 'the real thing', but the dev's do the best they can to make us believe that we are flying and fighting in air combat... however, gaming the game to make it do what we want is something that we all learn to do...

That doesn't mean that it's 100 percent accurate to the real world

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9 minutes ago, BlitzPig_EL said:

It can be done right now.  This isn't rocket science.  It's basic aircraft behavior and the only reason it's the way it is, is because the devs think this is how it should be.  Simple as that.

What game are you playing right now that simulates ground behavior 100% accurately? I'd love to hear it.

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10 minutes ago, BlitzPig_EL said:

It can be done right now.  This isn't rocket science.  It's basic aircraft behavior and the only reason it's the way it is, is because the devs think this is how it should be.  Simple as that.


If it was that easy the tanks in Post Scriptum (supposedly the 'state of the art UE4' engine) wouldn't catch air like dune-buggies going over rises at 40kmh (Tiger included). Giving 'weight' to vehicles on the ground (planes, tanks, whatever) isn't so simple apparently. Racing sims ditto, helium can't be coded out.

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11 minutes ago, Uffz-Prien said:


If it was that easy the tanks in Post Scriptum (supposedly the 'state of the art UE4' engine) wouldn't catch air like dune-buggies going over rises at 40kmh (Tiger included). Giving 'weight' to vehicles on the ground (planes, tanks, whatever) isn't so simple apparently. Racing sims ditto, helium can't be coded out.

Gaming physics are simple bud, it's not rocket science! That's totally why the havok physics engine is still powering games 15 years later I guess. Easy peasy.

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Oh boy, look at another game, cite their inability to make tanks drive properly, and somehow conflate that to the absolutely awful ground behavior of aircraft in this game.

 

Holy strawman Batman.

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Hello again... Back from my latest test session.

 

Wow, there's been some lively discussion happening while I was gone!  😀

 

So, things were MUCH better in my last session.  I tried the 109 (just to see if that too was giving me trouble, as it previously wasn't)... and that was fine (as expected).  I then tried the 190 again (the plane that was causing me the grief), and things were much better.

 

Can't tell you what I did differently, or what other conditions/factors were different, but things were much better.  Sure, you had to fight it a bit, but that's normal, and part of the fun.  I definitely seem to have to rev it high to get it to start moving while it's OFF the runway (ex. parking area), most likely because it's modelling rough terrain... but I'd immediately throtle down once it started moving.  On the runway or taxiways, I COULD get it moving at low throttle, but would have to actually wait a little while before it started moving... so, maybe previously I was impatient, and didn't realize it would start moving after several seconds, and would throttle higher as a result.

 

I steered using rudder and regular (both wheel) brakes, as well as paying even more attention to the tailwheel... and that all seemed to work.  Still sometimes a challenge, but fair enough.  I like that.

 

I wish the 190 had a toggle system for the tailwheel lock, as it's a little awkard twisting the yoke (for rudder) while simultaneously pulling back on it.... plus, it also means having extreme elevator applied when taking off (...unless you release the back pressure half way through the takeoff, which I now do...).

 

Once in a while, I will still get into that terrible ground spin, but it's far less frequent.  It's only frustrating in the fact that it seems so hard to get out of (with opposing rudder/brake, etc).  But, once the plane stops spinning, it's back to the regular handling again.

 

I managed to get the 190 down the runway and into the air, with good regularity... so, everything is good in my universe.

 

A big thanks again to all those who provided helpful responses.

 

Cheers!

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53 minutes ago, ladlon said:

Hello again... Back from my latest test session.

 

Wow, there's been some lively discussion happening while I was gone!  😀

 

So, things were MUCH better in my last session.  I tried the 109 (just to see if that too was giving me trouble, as it previously wasn't)... and that was fine (as expected).  I then tried the 190 again (the plane that was causing me the grief), and things were much better.

 

Can't tell you what I did differently, or what other conditions/factors were different, but things were much better.  Sure, you had to fight it a bit, but that's normal, and part of the fun.  I definitely seem to have to rev it high to get it to start moving while it's OFF the runway (ex. parking area), most likely because it's modelling rough terrain... but I'd immediately throtle down once it started moving.  On the runway or taxiways, I COULD get it moving at low throttle, but would have to actually wait a little while before it started moving... so, maybe previously I was impatient, and didn't realize it would start moving after several seconds, and would throttle higher as a result.

 

I steered using rudder and regular (both wheel) brakes, as well as paying even more attention to the tailwheel... and that all seemed to work.  Still sometimes a challenge, but fair enough.  I like that.

 

I wish the 190 had a toggle system for the tailwheel lock, as it's a little awkard twisting the yoke (for rudder) while simultaneously pulling back on it.... plus, it also means having extreme elevator applied when taking off (...unless you release the back pressure half way through the takeoff, which I now do...).

 

Once in a while, I will still get into that terrible ground spin, but it's far less frequent.  It's only frustrating in the fact that it seems so hard to get out of (with opposing rudder/brake, etc).  But, once the plane stops spinning, it's back to the regular handling again.

 

I managed to get the 190 down the runway and into the air, with good regularity... so, everything is good in my universe.

 

A big thanks again to all those who provided helpful responses.

 

Cheers!

You can definitely let go of the tailwheel lock by about 100kph, get the tail off the ground and you are good to go. Just remember to hold it on landings.

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2 hours ago, ladlon said:

 

...

So, things were MUCH better in my last session.  I tried the 109 (just to see if that too was giving me trouble, as it previously wasn't)... and that was fine (as expected).  I then tried the 190 again (the plane that was causing me the grief), and things were much better.

...

I managed to get the 190 down the runway and into the air, with good regularity... so, everything is good in my universe.

 

A big thanks again to all those who provided helpful responses.

 

Cheers!

 

I'm glad that your patience and perseverance paid off Ladlon.   :salute:

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Got the X52 Pro myself.  When traveling I am relying on the twist grip rudder.  I have brakes set to the pinky switch, the one under the main trigger, and use that for all planes no problem.  As stated, differential brakes will activate with rudder depressing when main brake switch is active at the same time.

 

No need on realistic FM for 190 to run man rads or prop pitch or anything else for take off.  Just pull back the stick, apply a little right rudder and open up the throttle.

 

Movements on stick and rudder smooth and gradual, as with flying - no curves or dead zones needed for the X52 Pro.

 

Don't over think it.

 

Taxiing - all aircraft, keep stick back and either use rudder or differential brakes to steer with a little throttle.  I will agree with BlitzPig, ground looping especially on a wide track undercarriage bird is pretty silly.  Funny though to see fresh flyers on line looping out on take off when online.

 

Take a breath, take it easy and enjoy.  BTW I have no idea how it flies outside of realistic setting.

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