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raaaid

so why people prefer to turn left?

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is it the engine torque?

 

is it right handedness?

 

is it certain wire in the human brain?

 

i was wonder if theres any left handed pilot who prefers to turn right

 

 

Edited by raaaid
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As a right hander, I find it is a little less awkward to push the stick over all the way to the left than to the right. I had to stop and think about whether I usually chose to break right or left when attacked and to be honest I do have a tendency to break left. May have to break myself of that habit, makes me predictable!

Engine torque might be something, but different planes have the torque go in different directions so its hard to say.

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Eheh, you got me raaid :)

 

Indeed in my RL fights, which are mostly made out of turning ( soaring is my passion for more than 38 yrs now... ) I really prefer to turn through the left, although sometimes I impose myself right turns.

 

Left circuits are also my preferred 🙂

 

I believe that since I only use my right hand to handle the stick in order to operate the gear lever or water ballast controls in the gliders I fly, that might be a good reason.

 

Captains in side-by-side aircraft cockpits will also more easily check their left side, unless it's an helicopter where the captain usually seats in the right. Maybe those prefer right turns ( ? )

 

And, btw, I'm right handed.

 

Edited by jcomm

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Nascar fans?

 

Perhaps it comes from people flying mostly from the left seat in RL aircraft and virtual aircraft that are not fighters (helicopter pilots and first officers excepted). You get a better view of the inside of your turns when you turn left.

Edited by JimTM
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1 hour ago, jcomm said:

Eheh, you got me raaid :)

 

Indeed in my RL fights, which are mostly made out of turning ( soaring is my passion for more than 38 yrs now... ) I really prefer to turn through the left, although sometimes I impose myself right turns.

 

Left circuits are also my preferred 🙂

 

I believe that since I only use my right hand to handle the stick in order to operate the gear lever or water ballast controls in the gliders I fly, that might be a good reason.

 

Captains in side-by-side aircraft cockpits will also more easily check their left side, unless it's an helicopter where the captain usually seats in the right. Maybe those prefer right turns ( ? )

 

And, btw, I'm right handed.

 

 

 

Another ironic twist, As a retired military helicopter pilot, I normally flew left seat along with most of my other pilot-in-command (PIC) peers.  Even though early model helicopters had PIC controls on the right side, we usually put the PI over there.  The late model aircraft have mostly full dual controls/instruments so it's not as big a deal.  "hey joe, can you hit the Nav switch for me"  One of the few things you couldn't reach from the left side for an ILS approach.

 

And I usually break left as well.  And usually a little too late.

Edited by C_DAT

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On defense out of cruising flight I try to make the *initial* break to the right while I have plenty of speed if practical, so that the *next* move when I'm probably going to be slower and at a higher AoA the roll will be to the left, and thus torque-assisted.
 

 

Edited by Rattlesnake
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Well this was a fact in war. I know some planes turn quicker that way   I do not remember but believe P 51 was behaving badly on sudden left turns. But I am sure someone correct me if my memory fail me. In a ww2 fighter you will be able to put more strength in a one arm turn. I think many times they used two hands in the stick to be able to manouver at all

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I tend to break right, don't know why, I'm right handed, but as a rift user, I think I prefer to physically look over my right shoulder making it a little easier to keep track of the Barsteward that just caught me by surprise ;)

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I'm a hard left turner by default.

I think, like Kestrel stated, it's because I'm right handed and it feels more natural to push that way.

I'm more comfortable say making a hard, loose condition turn on a bike or dirtbike that direction as well.

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As a Glider I find that I turn Right most of the time, but in the K-13, if flown Properly in a Thermal, the Stick will firmly press you left Nut into your left Kidney. while your Right Foot is keeping it in the Turn. 

 

I turn to the Right, and I'm fully right Handed and so are most of the Guys I know that prefer the Right turn. 

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44 minutes ago, Gambit21 said:

I'm a hard left turner by default.

I think, like Kestrel stated, it's because I'm right handed and it feels more natural to push that way.

I'm more comfortable say making a hard, loose condition turn on a bike or dirtbike that direction as well.

 

Same as well as in cars and boats.

 

Maybe it is because it is easier to push than to pull for right handed people.

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If i remember correctly someone form my squadron told me once that allied usually turned left due to torque on allied planes while axis planes have torque tendecy to the right which pilots used also for recognition back then.

 

In ww1 S.Camel and it's torque demanded to turn left due to bad aileron authority on ww1 kites, doing opposite cost many pilot lifes.

 

Now in virtual life how many pilots use that advantage i don't know since we are prone to our habbits being L/H or R/H.

Now on takeoff i always turn left and use left turn maneuvers on allied planes while when flying 109 for example and doing corkscrew climb maneuver with enemy on my six i always use right turn.

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1 hour ago, MiloMorai said:

Same as well as in cars and boats.

 

Maybe it is because it is easier to push than to pull for right handed people.

 

Perhaps, that's why the pitch up is pull, the pitch down is push the stick. Positive Gs are much more important and pulling is easier then pushing.

 

For the choice if break right or left if you have a clock-wise rotating prop the initial roll anti-clockwise will be faster thus break left could be executed faster.

Edited by Ehret

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4 hours ago, EAF_Ribbon said:

If i remember correctly someone form my squadron told me once that allied usually turned left due to torque on allied planes while axis planes have torque tendecy to the right which pilots used also for recognition back then.

 

In ww1 S.Camel and it's torque demanded to turn left due to bad aileron authority on ww1 kites, doing opposite cost many pilot lifes.

 

Now in virtual life how many pilots use that advantage i don't know since we are prone to our habbits being L/H or R/H.

Now on takeoff i always turn left and use left turn maneuvers on allied planes while when flying 109 for example and doing corkscrew climb maneuver with enemy on my six i always use right turn.

 

No: the Camel loves to turn right, the problem is that when you pull the stick back in the turn the nose yaws to the right. This is not torque, but precession, which is easy to counter with the rudder.  The reason this could cause problems for an inexperienced pilot is that on seeing the nose dropping in a RH turn, there is an instinctive reaction to try to correct by pulling the stick back: which just makes the downwards yaw worse, potentially leading to an uncontrollable spiral. 

 

You do not initiate a turn in WW1 planes with ailerons, but with rudder.  

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Right-handers turn left most of the time, because it is a more natural movement and you can more easily look over your left shoulder to check behind as you do it.

 

Circuits are traditionally flown to the left for this reason, though obviously some fields or days will switch this.

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1 hour ago, unreasonable said:

 

No: the Camel loves to turn right, the problem is that when you pull the stick back in the turn the nose yaws to the right. This is not torque, but precession, which is easy to counter with the rudder.  The reason this could cause problems for an inexperienced pilot is that on seeing the nose dropping in a RH turn, there is an instinctive reaction to try to correct by pulling the stick back: which just makes the downwards yaw worse, potentially leading to an uncontrollable spiral. 

 

You do not initiate a turn in WW1 planes with ailerons, but with rudder.  

Thanks for the details, than i heard wrong....now waiting for someone to tell me you told me wrong 😜

Yeah i know rudder has greater authority over ailerons on kites and used in turns.

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11 minutes ago, EAF_Ribbon said:

Thanks for the details, than i heard wrong....now waiting for someone to tell me you told me wrong 😜

Yeah i know rudder has greater authority over ailerons on kites and used in turns.

 

Plenty of people tell me I am wrong about plenty of things: but on this one, do not hold your breath! 

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It could be that it is easier to push the stick with your right hand rather than pull , but it could also be "certain wire in the human brain" as raaaid put it. Runners in ancient Greek Olympics or Roman horse races also turned left. I have read two different "physiological explanations" about this phenomenon (neither of which might be true).

1. People feel more comfortable about left turns in high speed, because heart is on left side, so the centrifugal force is making it easier for heart to pump oxygen-rich blood to your body. 

2. In northern hemisphere, the coriolis force caused by Earth's rotation is affecting the liquid in your internal ear so that people prefer to turn left.

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1 hour ago, II./JG77_Kemp said:

It could be that it is easier to push the stick with your right hand rather than pull , but it could also be "certain wire in the human brain" as raaaid put it. Runners in ancient Greek Olympics or Roman horse races also turned left. I have read two different "physiological explanations" about this phenomenon (neither of which might be true).

1. People feel more comfortable about left turns in high speed, because heart is on left side, so the centrifugal force is making it easier for heart to pump oxygen-rich blood to your body. 

2. In northern hemisphere, the coriolis force caused by Earth's rotation is affecting the liquid in your internal ear so that people prefer to turn left.

 

Feathered_IV is in the Southern hemisphere, and does not prefer to turn right: so your explanation 2 must be right correct! 

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In Sports like Snowboarding, figure skating ect. there always seems to be a Majority that makes predominantly left spins, a minority that does them to the Right and an even smaller subset of people that do it in both directions. Might just be something that you just have, like a dominant Hand (or a sexual orientation).

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Sasha Pokryshkin wrote in his memoirs, that he had noticed his opponents left breaking/turning tendency very early on after first air combats. He went on practising right turns to get advantage of this "leftist" behaviour of enemy pilots.

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Relating to WW1 here.. if I'm in an Alby vs a Camel I'll break left, since my belief is that the Alby works better going left whilst the Camel doesn't. If in the Camel I try to get the Alb going to the right. So in certain cases it depends on plane match up.

 

If left to nature as it were, I definately have a tendancy to break / turn left, as a right-hander.

If I attempt a head-on encounter I usually rudder-in from right to left. The other way does feel a little awkward for some reason. So same result there.

 

S!

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(CNN)UPS trucks almost never take left-hand turns.

By favoring right-hand turns at all times -- unless a left is unavoidable -- the carrier saves millions of gallons of fuel each year, and avoids emissions equivalent to over 20,000 passenger cars.
The practice started decades ago, before computers and GPS, and is now managed by a software that conjures the most efficient route for each truck.
 

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Lost of speculation, but it is basically a right-hander thing emphasised further in a single-seater by the right hand being primarily on the stick. If most of us were left-handed and / or fighters were set up to fly left-handed you would doubtless see more instinctive turns to the right.

 

The world is historically set-up for right-handers, probably more so in military aspects.

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also nearly everybody writes the "O" to the left :)

 

even left handed people

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I read a book years ago, about Vietnam I think,  that mentioned people instinctively looking left faster than looking right, so ambushes were set up, if you knew the direction the soldiers were walking, to attack them from the right. You were ever so slightly harder to see in your ambush position and the soldiers took just a tiny bit longer to react. You use what advantages you can.

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as someone said, its easier for me to ride a bike with only left hand than with only right hand (which is actually impossible for me). Also, although im right handed for writing and everything, I control the joystick with the left hand and the throttle with the right one, this is probably because Im used to the position I fly the C150 (to the left), which is how I set up the layout in my home sim as well (similar the C150). 

 

As something curious, the other day I tried using the joystick with the right hand, and tried to take off a plane, it was a total disaster, the plane just ended up crashing; my right hand is totally useless for the joystick. 

 

And yeah, I noticed the "turn to the left" tendencies, at least during a dogfight, always wondered if I was the only one. This post surprised me and found it quite interesting 😄

4 hours ago, II./JG77_Kemp said:

It could be that it is easier to push the stick with your right hand rather than pull 

at least for me, its way easier to pull than to push, no matter which hand I use

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2 hours ago, Brano said:

Sasha Pokryshkin wrote in his memoirs, that he had noticed his opponents left breaking/turning tendency very early on after first air combats. He went on practising right turns to get advantage of this "leftist" behaviour of enemy pilots.

 

I am surprised the Commissar let him get away with that. No enemies on the left!

2 hours ago, ZachariasX said:

(CNN)UPS trucks almost never take left-hand turns.

By favoring right-hand turns at all times -- unless a left is unavoidable -- the carrier saves millions of gallons of fuel each year, and avoids emissions equivalent to over 20,000 passenger cars.
The practice started decades ago, before computers and GPS, and is now managed by a software that conjures the most efficient route for each truck.
 

 

No wonder UPS service here in Thailand is so slow.

45 minutes ago, CanadaOne said:

I read a book years ago, about Vietnam I think,  that mentioned people instinctively looking left faster than looking right, so ambushes were set up, if you knew the direction the soldiers were walking, to attack them from the right. You were ever so slightly harder to see in your ambush position and the soldiers took just a tiny bit longer to react. You use what advantages you can.

 

That is quite correct. Even if you have your rifle in the patrol position; that is with the butt into your RH shoulder for a RH person and the weapon held close to horizontal ready to fire ; which is tiring especially with older, heavier rifles; it will naturally be pointing slightly to your left.  To get on target to the left you just raise the sights. To the right you have to rotate your shoulders or move your feet.

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Well, his application to communist party was temporarily scraped as he had a "bar fight" with higer ranking officer while staying at 25.ZAP transiting to Airacobras😀

 

Edit: to go back to the topic. The question remains, whether he punched him in the face with his left or right hand.

Edited by Brano
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google..

After World War I, most airplanes had rotary engines with left turning tendencies because it followed the torque of the engine. Therefore, turning left was easier than turning right. Because of this, pilots considered left turns as more convenient maneuver, and thus more experienced pilot started sitting on the left.

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I used to play a Newtonian physics based space flight sim.  There was no wind or engine torque effects to factor in.  Most players were using joysticks with twist yaw control.  It was during PvP sessions I noticed that most turns and the most accurate shots people (and I) made were to the left due to the ease of hand motion.   

 

That said, winds and engine torque are a factor in IL-2 and other flight sims. It will be a bit more difficult for a plane to turn one way or the other due to the direction the prop is spinning.  I also recall hearing veteran pilot interviews re-counting that during training they were told planes like the 109 and to a lesser degree 190s had difficulty turning to one direction (I forget which) and to try to make the fight favor that direction to reduce their turning abilities a bit.  

It was also a common joke among LW pilots that since 109s had no rudder trim, all that was needed to qualify for the pilot recruiting process was for trainees to have a "strong right leg". 

 

A few years ago, when I used to play !L2 '46 online, some of the pilots regularly on TeamSpeak would comment that since they were used to 109's when they took VVS fighters they had more difficulty turning them due to VVS props on many fighters turning the opposite direction of props on German planes.   

 

I hear often people get into a plane that "should be able to out-turn a 109" and find themselves frustrated when they can't.  I believe that the plane actually can out-turn said 109 but only in the direction the 109 has more difficulty in turning.  I haven't really tested it out for myself much though, so don't take my word for it.   

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17 hours ago, raaaid said:

is it the engine torque?

 

is it right handedness?

 

is it certain wire in the human brain?

 

i was wonder if theres any left handed pilot who prefers to turn right

 

 

as Raid points out it's the torque of engine and the way your hand lays in your lap. For some german planes they have a hard time going right like the FW190's

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is it the engine torque?  Helps aircraft turns easier that direction as many have already said

 

is it right handedness? Its easier to push across the body than pull so if your flying right-handed yes

 

is it certain wire in the human brain? Muscle memory maybe

 

i was wonder if theres any left handed pilot who prefers to turn right? Now I'm left handed but right arm dominant due to working in engineering all my life where nearly all machines and

measuring equipment are right handed even a steel rule.   I do fly right handed and Yes i break left

 

But i have noticed i like to attack from high left if i can

 

 

Interesting subject matter

Edited by Zippy-do-dar

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All very interesting reasons to turn left, but I think the real reason is because everyone has been watching too much NASCAR.

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Sorry Legioneod, European here. No Nascar. When watching motorsports I like to stay awake. Many corners both left and right is more interesting! 😎 😈

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Hey All, I thought I would chime in here with a VR perspective on things. I hold my stick with my right hand and I typically bank left. I never thought about why until now, but I think I have the answer (at least for me).

 

Since I am playing in VR in order for me to check my six I have to physically turn my head all the way around to see behind me. When I do this I tend to favor looking to my left, because I am holding the stick with my right arm.

 

Try sticking out your right arm as if you were flying or driving a car or something. Its much easier to turn to the left than it is to turn to the right.

 

I believe that this also influences which way I tend to bank, because if I bank left, its alot easier for my to look out the left or leftback side of my plane while I am turning

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Left handed pilot here ;)....Joystick in left hand, throttle on the right...i do not really have a preference in the choice of the turn...

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