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How should I manage that new Turbocharger ?

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Ok, request for comments, suggestions, lessons :-)

 

Syn Requiem didn't yet produce he's usual GREAT! tutorial videos about the new K-4 and P-47, and I searched in the Web, and found for instance this interesting article:

 

https://lynceans.org/all-posts/the-complexity-of-a-ww-ii-p-47-thunderbolts-powerplant/

 

but instead of making me feel "I now know how to deal with it..." it made me feel more like  - Wow, let me pick that 190 or 109 whose incredible engines are so easy to deal with :-)

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Essentially: Turbo Lever never goes ahead of throttle lever. Increase: Throttle first, then turbo. Decrease: Turbo first, then Throttle. You can interlink them but according to Greg, that costs you quite a bit of horsepower (unknown whether modelled correctly or not). Turbo only makes sense at altitudes where your engine wouldn't reach maximum MAP by itself. At lower alts, I think that's only the case when you engage the WEP. Think of the Turbo as a buttkicker for your MAP whenever it's not going full as it should. Technically, revving your Turbo up at altitudes where you wouldn't need it should cost you a bit of performance, don't know how well this is modelled.

3 minutes ago, 6./ZG26_Klaus_Mann said:

<Gregs vid on the matter>

Two stupids, one idea:D

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Great!

 

Thank you guys!!!!

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Remember: Try to keep the Intake Air in the Yellow (Inlet Shuttter Control, Full Rich only Adds Power with Water Injection, otherwise use Auto Rich. For the Turbo: Unless absolutely needed don't use it on Take-Off at all, keep the throttle at full and use the Turbo to regulate Manifold Pressure

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Well, and Syn just released he's tutorial video too!

 

 

 

And, as I was browsing he's youtube channel, found yet another superb tutorial!

 

 

 

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Right now (at least before yesterdays patch) the turbo being ahead of the throttle did not cause any issues in game.

The easiest way to manage turbo is by linking it with throttle (see bottom of engine key binding list).

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16 minutes ago, Jade_Monkey said:

Right now (at least before yesterdays patch) the turbo being ahead of the throttle did not cause any issues in game.

The easiest way to manage turbo is by linking it with throttle (see bottom of engine key binding list).

 

It shouldn´t as long as MAP is within limits.

When using the Turbo, the air let into the engine will become hotter and thus decrease power compared to not using Turbo at the same amount of MAP.

It can be used to control carburator air temp and prevent carb icing.

 

I guess You use throttle until it isn´t sufficient to get the MAP You require, then from there, use the Turbo.

 

FinnJ

Edited by fjacobsen

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I like to think of the turbo as an extension of the throttle. Once the throttle is maxed, use turbo to further increase MAP. One can always link them, but I think it's simple enough not to link them, and cost yourself some horsepower.

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I'm not at home so I don't have access to things right now to screenshot, but in the manual which covers the D-28, the turbo is recommended to be linked before takeoff and unlinked when reaching critical altitude for the turbo. With our P47 I believe the max MP starts dropping off at about 2-3000ft without the turbo.

 

With the N model though it recommends no turbo use below 7000ft if I remember right.

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Now that you mention it, I could see the reason to link turbo for takeoff. Especially on a fully loaded P47. I remember having to use full throttle, turbo, and boost to successfully take off fully loaded.

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20 minutes ago, Warpig said:

Now that you mention it, I could see the reason to link turbo for takeoff. Especially on a fully loaded P47. I remember having to use full throttle, turbo, and boost to successfully take off fully loaded.

I've found out a fully loaded P47 is quite a heavy girl 2500lb bombs + rockets i use 25% fuel gives about forty minutes flight time if my maths it right

 A significant  number P47's were crashed in testing. But i'm now getting reliable take-offs

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18 minutes ago, Zippy-do-dar said:

I've found out a fully loaded P47 is quite a heavy girl 2500lb bombs + rockets i use 25% fuel gives about forty minutes flight time if my maths it right

 A significant  number P47's were crashed in testing. But i'm now getting reliable take-offs

I never adjusted the fuel, so I probably had full fuel as well when I tried this.

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11 hours ago, SYN_Requiem said:

 With our P47 I believe the max MP starts dropping off at about 2-3000ft without the turbo.

 

 

You mean 23,000 feet...;)

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10 minutes ago, busdriver said:

 

You mean 23,000 feet...;)

The supercharger not the turbo supercharger.

 

Supercharger starts to drop at around 2-3000ft though I would have though it was around 7-12k ft based off what the manual says. I probably just read it wrong though.

Edited by Legioneod

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11 minutes ago, Legioneod said:

The supercharger not the turbo supercharger.

 

I'm not following what you're implying. Should I infer you're telling me there are two separate superchargers? A supercharger and a turbo-supercharger?

 

1025962325_Superchargerdescription.JPG.223657553cbb37433d2fcca5c7d980d4.JPG

 

945279523_superchargerplumbing.thumb.JPG.feb49a0202d7ba4b711aac3bb56a854b.JPG

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Exactly! 47 has both as it has been explained to me in another thread.

Edited by II/JG17_HerrMurf

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Just now, busdriver said:

 

I'm not following what you're implying. Should I infer you're telling me there are two separate superchargers? A supercharger and a turbo-supercharger?

 

1025962325_Superchargerdescription.JPG.223657553cbb37433d2fcca5c7d980d4.JPG

 

945279523_superchargerplumbing.thumb.JPG.feb49a0202d7ba4b711aac3bb56a854b.JPG

Yes. There is a supercharger that is built into the engine and is automatic, and there is the turbocharger.

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So this engine mounted supercharger (can't find a graphic of the motor) starts dropping (i.e. not delivering sufficient supplement air to the carburetor) between 2000 to 3000 feet? That's surprising. Hardly worth the name supercharger...eh. Thanks for the correction.

 

But back to my initial post as it relates to Requiem's use of 2-3000ft. He and I had been discussing a nominal altitude the turbo blinking light would turn steady (overspeeding). We (he and I) were using 23,000 feet as a nominal value. I was just pulling his chain...as I do so often with him. My apologies.

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1 hour ago, busdriver said:

Hardly worth the name supercharger...eh.

Why? It gives you almost 60 inches at SL. Sort of 1.98 ata. ;)

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1 minute ago, ZachariasX said:

Why? It gives you almost 60 inches at SL. Sort of 1.98 ata. ;)

LOL...and at 3,000 feet MSL?

 

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11 minutes ago, busdriver said:

LOL...and at 3,000 feet MSL?

 

Yes. MSL= Mean Simulator FlightleveL.

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Schematic of a turbo supercharged radial (like the P-47) from America's Hundred Thousand.  Shows the internal supercharger mounted on the rear of the radial engine, and the turbo supercharger.

P47turboradial.jpg

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15 hours ago, busdriver said:

So this engine mounted supercharger (can't find a graphic of the motor) starts dropping (i.e. not delivering sufficient supplement air to the carburetor) between 2000 to 3000 feet? That's surprising. Hardly worth the name supercharger...eh. Thanks for the correction.

 

But back to my initial post as it relates to Requiem's use of 2-3000ft. He and I had been discussing a nominal altitude the turbo blinking light would turn steady (overspeeding). We (he and I) were using 23,000 feet as a nominal value. I was just pulling his chain...as I do so often with him. My apologies.

Chain successfully yanked! LOL Yeah I was referring to the "regular" supercharger and not the Turbosupercharger as we talked about the other day.

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