Jump to content
Flynco

New P-47 hipoxia

Recommended Posts

6 minutes ago, Flynco said:

so yes or no

 

Not sure, I've never had my oxygen supply damaged at high altitude.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is hypoxia modelled in other airplanes? I've never noticed. What in game symptoms should I look for?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, busdriver said:

Is hypoxia modelled in other airplanes? I've never noticed. What in game symptoms should I look for?

 

I don't think it is, I've never experience it in all my time playing. My guess it would be blurry vision and eventually black out if it is simulated in-game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spawn with an I-16 at 10k and find out if its modeled yourself. I believe it is not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Flynco said:

so yes or no

 

Possibly

30 minutes ago, pegg00 said:

Spawn with an I-16 at 10k and find out if its modeled yourself. I believe it is not.

 

The I-16 has an oxygen system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, LukeFF said:

 

Possibly

 

The I-16 has an oxygen system.

Turn it off

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, pegg00 said:

Turn it off

 

You can't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got damaged in a Yak 1B at 7,000 meters , and got a tech message oxygen system damaged or something like that.

 

Waited and nothing happened.

 

This was like 3 updates ago though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, busdriver said:

Is hypoxia modelled in other airplanes? I've never noticed. What in game symptoms should I look for?

Look for long term brain damage.

  • Haha 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When oxygen systems were first introduced (I think during BoM development) its supposed effects were described in some detail in either a DD or list of changes for an update.

 

From memory it was something like reduced strength of the pilot leading to sluggish controls (similar to when wounded) followed by a gradual onset of blackout. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank to all for reply, in DCS hipoxia is modeled in P-51d, F-86 Sabre, F-5 Tiger Northrop, maybe in the Spitfire, and in A-10 Thunderbolt 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The hs129 doesn't have an oxygen system, test it with that! (even says flight above 4000m is prohibited in the manual) I seem to remember a long time ago a dev saying that the less oxygen the pilot had the easier it was for them to black out with high G manoeuvres,  I liked this approach but I don't think it has ever been modelled or if it was a long time ago, it has been removed or broke.

 

edit: correct me if I am wrong but I do not remember seeing any affects of hypoxia in this sim.

Edited by Bullets
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same here, I have never experienced any effects, even though I get oxygen system damage all the time.

 

Edited by danielprates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hypoxia is a bear to model. Everybody has different symptoms and the more dangerous parts of hypoxia (impacts on decision-making, general euphoria, etc.) can't be modelled, unless you're depriving yourself of oxygen in front of your rig.

 

7 minutes ago, Bullets said:

The hs129 doesn't have an oxygen system, test it with that! (even says flight above 4000m is prohibited in the manual)

 

At 4000m, you'd just be out of gas before any hard effects of hypoxia kick in.

You'd have slightly reduced vision, a slower brain and you'd be short on breath mainly.

Maybe you could blur the vision somewhat to simulate a lack of focus and concentration-ability.

 

The real fun-stuff begins at higher altitudes (we're talking short term effects here, not mountaineers).

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, danielprates said:

Same here, I have never experienced any effects, even though I get oxygen system damage all the time.

 

 

Have you tried pinching your nose? 😁

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is why I liked the idea of decreasing "G tolerability" and then just starting to slowly black out. I have hypoxia training next month I will post my experiences :salute: 

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Bremspropeller said:

Hypoxia is a bear to model. Everybody has different symptoms and the more dangerous parts of hypoxia (impacts on decision-making, general euphoria, etc.) can't be modelled, unless you're depriving yourself of oxygen in front of your rig.

 

 

At 4000m, you'd just be out of gas before any hard effects of hypoxia kick in.

You'd have slightly reduced vision, a slower brain and you'd be short on breath mainly.

Maybe you could blur the vision somewhat to simulate a lack of focus and concentration-ability.

 

The real fun-stuff begins at higher altitudes (we're talking short term effects here, not mountaineers).

 

 

 

 

I have Mt biked at 4,000 meters in the Andes, and actually we had to ride uphill (yes no gas, no air but brain function not affected at all)

We stayed all day between 4,000 and 3000 meters.

 

There has been many GA accidents where the cabin lost pressurization and pilots pass out, autopilot keeps going and plane crashes when out of fuel.

So if you loose your oxygen system high enough, easy to model, you die , because you will pass out and not wake up when diving out of fuel.

If you are like at 6,000 meters maybe an in between would be good , same as wounded is modeled (better than nothing) and if you dive down you re gain your strenght, so in the case you will be forced to go down quick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember that I was once damaged by enemy fire and my pilot started breathing heavily in straight flight. ( i dont use technochat so i dont know if the oxygen system was damaged)

Unfortunately I ended QMB quickly afterwards so there was no time to observe any effect

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tried it in the Camel at 7000m, and no hypoxia at all... It isn't modelled.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, II./JG77_motoadve said:

I have Mt biked at 4,000 meters in the Andes, and actually we had to ride uphill (yes no gas, no air but brain function not affected at all)

 

You obviously are a trained individual, so your body can handle hypoxia better than the typical 250lbs couch-slug.

Brain-function is hard to personally assess, as you won't recognize how you're affected.

 

When talking about hypoxia, sooner or later this tape comes up.

 

 

Edited by Bremspropeller

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Flynco said:

Thank to all for reply, in DCS hipoxia is modeled in P-51d, F-86 Sabre, F-5 Tiger Northrop, maybe in the Spitfire, and in A-10 Thunderbolt 

 

Shame fun isn't modelled in DCS 😉

  • Like 1
  • Haha 5
  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hypoxia? Who needs oxygen when you have castor oil? Nothing better then the smell of laxative in the morning.

zrWpXXQ.jpg

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's...interesting is that the Il-2 M41 has an oxygen system. Why on Earth Mr. Ilyushin thought that a ground attack aircraft would be flying that high is a mystery to me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, LukeFF said:

Why on Earth Mr. Ilyushin thought that a ground attack aircraft would be flying that high is a mystery to me.

Ask the Chinese. They went to Tibet. ;)

 

Also, exhaust gases entering the cockpit might be an issue. But no idea whether that is an issue in the IL-2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did a quick test by spawning in a Camel at 10,000m with some maneuvering on the way down. Beginning of greyout was around 2.5-3G.

  • Thanks 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, SYN_Requiem said:

Did a quick test by spawning in a Camel at 10,000m with some maneuvering on the way down. Beginning of greyout was around 2.5-3G.

 

Yes Requiem, I did notice that too, but... if I don't pull Gs I can fly forever ( if I can manage to in the Camel at that altitude, and the thing is a bitch if it falls into a spin... ) without any effect ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, SYN_Requiem said:

Did a quick test by spawning in a Camel at 10,000m with some maneuvering on the way down. Beginning of greyout was around 2.5-3G. 

 

You can pull more than 2 G on the Camel at that altitude? Impressive. How did you determine g-load?

 

Here, this is what you should expect as time of useful consciousness  (TUC) (from Wiki):

 

Altitude (measured barometrically) TUC (normal ascent) TUC (rapid decompression)
FL180 (18,000 ft; 5,500 m) 20 to 30 minutes 10 to 15 minutes
FL220 (22,000 ft; 6,700 m) 10 minutes 5 minutes
FL250 (25,000 ft; 7,600 m) 3 to 5 minutes 1.5 to 3.5 minutes
FL280 (28,000 ft; 8,550 m) 2.5 to 3 minutes 1.25 to 1.5 minutes
FL300 (30,000 ft; 9,150 m) 1 to 2 minutes 30 to 60 seconds
FL350 (35,000 ft; 10,650 m) 30 secs to 1 minute 15 to 30 seconds
FL400 (40,000 ft; 12,200 m) 15 to 20 seconds 7 to 10 seconds
FL430 (43,000 ft; 13,100 m) 9 to 12 seconds 5 seconds
FL500 (50,000 ft; 15,250 m) 9 to 12 seconds 5 seconds

 

That doesn't happen. But it is nice to see that strain impacts pilot ability. But not sure if it is the cold or the lack of oxigen that is the culpit. I mean, FL300 in an open cockpit as the Camel is not survivable.

 

But this all is really academic until BoBP is fully mature and we have aircraft that were fighting at that altitude. And I'd be very happy if the Spitfire radiator wouldn't overheat way before hypoxia kills. First things first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Bremspropeller said:

At 4000m, you'd just be out of gas before any hard effects of hypoxia kick in.

You'd have slightly reduced vision, a slower brain and you'd be short on breath mainly.

Maybe you could blur the vision somewhat to simulate a lack of focus and concentration-ability.

 

The real fun-stuff begins at higher altitudes (we're talking short term effects here, not mountaineers).

 

12 hours ago, Bremspropeller said:

You obviously are a trained individual, so your body can handle hypoxia better than the typical 250lbs couch-slug.

 

I am not trained (well, at least not for low oxygen situations) and I also don't have any side effects at 4.5k sitting in my skydive plane (which sometimes lasts quite a while, when people are afraid to jump out in front of you), apart from slight tingling in my fingers. Never had side effects snowboarding at 4k, even though it's a "bit" more exerting then flying a plane, especially when being on the mountain for the first time in 8 month. Have never been in free air above that, but at least in my case I am pretty sure no hypoxia effects below 5k...

 

It's something really hard to model, because I guess pilots have been trained for low oxy situations and would have had quite different tolerances. But there should be some randomized factor at least at high alt. Pretty sure that real pilots in WW2 would dive down to 4k immediately if their oxygen would not work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ZachariasX said:

And I'd be very happy if the Spitfire radiator wouldn't overheat way before hypoxia kills. First things first.

 

Patched in last update 👍

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once we were forced to go above 4k in a plane not meant for that alt.

It was around 5-6k for 20min at least, we could feel euphoria (was it form knowing hypoxia will affect us or hypoxia itself i don't know) but nothing else happened beside that and a slightly bit heavier breathing.

However we weren't exposed to heavy G maneuvers or heavy workload.

I was 20+years old back then but there was also 50+ guys.

I guess it takes time to feel the hypoxia effects along with G forces and workload.....

So keep in mind to test properly you need to stay at high alt more than few minutes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, II./JG77_Manu* said:

Have never been in free air above that, but at least in my case I am pretty sure no hypoxia effects below 5k...

You can‘t feel it when it starts to kick in, that is the problem. What it maily does right above 4k m altitude is convince you that you‘re ok and that because it was ok at 4.5k it is still ok at 5k... and then...

 

I‘ve heard from some stories that the guy actually realitzed getting a black and white vision. Taking that as a final warning he headed back and descended immediately.

 

Same as with scuba diving and going deeper than you‘re suposed to. „Hey... I‘m still feeling well. Just look at allthese colors!“

 

I‘ve never seen any training for hypoxia tolerance besides an extended stay on a mountain. How would that look like?

 

It is also apparent that there are both longterm and short term effects to hypoxia. I remember last time, taking a flight from Lima to Cuzco. The evening after our arrival, 4 out of 12 didn‘t show up for dinner, feeling unwell. So yes, there is hypoxia even at 3.5k meters. Hypoxia is not just the „passing out thing.“

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...