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where to read about soviet aces in english

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i am not happy with my Osprey aircraft off the aces 015 , 056 , 064 and 102 . Too simple and the prints dont really reflect the correct camo tones . Where else can i read about them ? English preferably , can be French Itallian or Portughese as well .

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A wholehearted recommendation for "Dragons on Bird Wings: The Combat History of the 812th Fighter Regiment" by Vlad Antipov and Igor Utkin. It was published in 2006 by Aviaeology and is, to my knowledge, the only unit history of the VVS in English.

 

The 812th Fighter Regiment waa, despite lacking the honorific Guards title, one of the best Soviet fighter squadrons of WW2, it having destroyed more than 500 enemy aircraft and producing a number of aces with over 10 kills.

 

Despite the imposing title of "Fighter Regiment", a Soviet IAP is actually the size of a USAAF Fighter Squadron and has on average 20 combat planes. So this is the story of a small unit told from mostly the tactical and personal level, with the strategic situation detailed in the background. The 812th had the rare distinction of flying almost throughout the entire war within the 3rd Air Corps (similar to a USAAF Ffighter Wing in size), which was highly successfull units containing many other ace squadrons, such as the 402nd IAP. They also had the distinction of flying various Yak models throughout the war, and beautifully marked ones as well.

 

It's a fantastic book that's I have been hoping to get for many years, and I only managed to this April. Very thoroughly researched, very detailed accounts of individual dogfights (claims and losses are cross-referenced with Luftwaffe archives) and overall combat situation, lots of high quality photos and profiles.

 

It has also seriously challenged my preconceptions of the air war in the East, especially a lot of the myths regarding the Soviets. For example, the 812th had a dedicated mobile radar unit that on average had 7 radar trucks, for early warning, vectoring and navigation, pretty much from 1942 through to the end of the war. And they were far from the only IAP (squadron) to have one - within the 3rd IAK all squadrons had a radar unit.

 

The only downisde is that it's Vol. 1 and the story ends with the liberation of Crimea in May 1944. The planned Vol. 2 for the last year of the war was never published.

 

At any rate, it's a unique, very well made book that allows to actually understand what a Soviet fighter pilot and unit experienced, how they fought, suffered, learned and ultimitely triumphed. It's also the story of an ace squadron. :)

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On 11/19/2018 at 10:45 PM, Burdokva said:

A wholehearted recommendation for "Dragons on Bird Wings: The Combat History of the 812th Fighter Regiment" by Vlad Antipov and Igor Utkin. It was published in 2006 by Aviaeology and is, to my knowledge, the only unit history of the VVS in English.

 

The 812th Fighter Regiment waa, despite lacking the honorific Guards title, one of the best Soviet fighter squadrons of WW2, it having destroyed more than 500 enemy aircraft and producing a number of aces with over 10 kills.

 

Despite the imposing title of "Fighter Regiment", a Soviet IAP is actually the size of a USAAF Fighter Squadron and has on average 20 combat planes. So this is the story of a small unit told from mostly the tactical and personal level, with the strategic situation detailed in the background. The 812th had the rare distinction of flying almost throughout the entire war within the 3rd Air Corps (similar to a USAAF Ffighter Wing in size), which was highly successfull units containing many other ace squadrons, such as the 402nd IAP. They also had the distinction of flying various Yak models throughout the war, and beautifully marked ones as well.

 

It's a fantastic book that's I have been hoping to get for many years, and I only managed to this April. Very thoroughly researched, very detailed accounts of individual dogfights (claims and losses are cross-referenced with Luftwaffe archives) and overall combat situation, lots of high quality photos and profiles.

 

It has also seriously challenged my preconceptions of the air war in the East, especially a lot of the myths regarding the Soviets. For example, the 812th had a dedicated mobile radar unit that on average had 7 radar trucks, for early warning, vectoring and navigation, pretty much from 1942 through to the end of the war. And they were far from the only IAP (squadron) to have one - within the 3rd IAK all squadrons had a radar unit.

 

The only downisde is that it's Vol. 1 and the story ends with the liberation of Crimea in May 1944. The planned Vol. 2 for the last year of the war was never published.

 

At any rate, it's a unique, very well made book that allows to actually understand what a Soviet fighter pilot and unit experienced, how they fought, suffered, learned and ultimitely triumphed. It's also the story of an ace squadron. :)

Does that book say when 812 iap start use Yak-9T, and from what bases in 1943, its time they could be operating at bases in Kuban map.

 

 "The ensuing three chapters chart the combat history of the 812th Fighter Regiment from spring 1943 through May 1944 in the Kuban, the southern Ukraine, and over the Crimea. "

http://stonebooks.com/~bstone/archives/061105.shtml

Edited by 77.CountZero

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On 11/7/2018 at 12:51 PM, dog1 said:

i am not happy with my Osprey aircraft off the aces 015 , 056 , 064 and 102 . Too simple and the prints dont really reflect the correct camo tones . Where else can i read about them ? English preferably , can be French Itallian or Portughese as well .

 

Think you just bring in the words I can not find as an non English speaker, but those Ospey and I have a couple of them, mostly WW1 are indeed bad made. 

 

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On 12/21/2018 at 8:51 AM, 77.CountZero said:

Does that book say when 812 iap start use Yak-9T, and from what bases in 1943, its time they could be operating at bases in Kuban map.

 

 "The ensuing three chapters chart the combat history of the 812th Fighter Regiment from spring 1943 through May 1944 in the Kuban, the southern Ukraine, and over the Crimea. "

http://stonebooks.com/~bstone/archives/061105.shtml

Dragons on birds wings is really very good, yes.

The 3. IAK with all subordinated units IAPs, IADs did not use Yak-9 in the Kuban. They used these starting autumn  1943, first in todays Ukraine (Melitopol etc), then in early 1944 during the liberation of the Crimea.

On my website you can read an article by a friend about one day of heavy fighting there: http://yogysoft.de/Black_Friday_3IAK.htm

 

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