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Jason_Williams

American and British Voice "Actors" Needed ASAP!!

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19 year old from the Northeastern USA. I could definitely do an Italian-American/NYC accent if needed. 

Edited by Weegas
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NE US Accent, early 40's with "youthful" voice(you be the judge of that one), and meet the other requirements!

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On 10/29/2018 at 5:19 PM, Weegas said:

19 year old from the Northeastern USA. I could definitely do an Italian-American/NYC accent if needed. 

I'm an Italian American from New York! What is this accent you're talkin' about? Whaddya tryin' to be funny? You wanna get whacked or somethin'!!?

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My son,  18 year old Australia with a British twang does voice work.  He has a  professional Audiotechnica AT2020 mic & pop filter setup.  He'd be happy to help for the love of the game. 

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Hi Jason!
Don't know if you're still looking for VA help but I'm British and speak with a Scouse accent, also lots of experience with military stuff and radio work as well as aviation.

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Hi there, I might be a little bit late, but I'd be willing to contribute to the British voice actor pile should you need me. I've been told I have a good "Distinctive" British Modified RP accent, the R.A.F is my chosen career path and I have some experience with real radios which may be of use! 

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Hi Jason, are you still looking for voice actors?  Any Australian voice packs needed for Commonwealth pilots?  A few of us would be ready to assist.

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Just found this thread... would love to help the development...

 

US pilot willing to assist. People do say I have a voice for radio.

 

Edited by AH_Hollywood

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Ok guys,

 

It's time to fire this project up for real very soon. I've put it off long enough, probably too long, had to get some other projects out of the way. Probably have a meeting this weekend after I return from London to get everyone who can help going.

 

More very soon...

 

Jason

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Take a microphone to the pub on Thursday - you should get some ripe British accents there, plus some expressive phrases as the night wears on! :biggrin:

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On 11/7/2018 at 7:18 PM, Poochnboo said:

 

I'm an Italian American from New York! What is this accent you're talkin' about? Whaddya tryin' to be funny? You wanna get whacked or somethin'!!?

 

We need it! 😀

 

Bump for italo americans!

gentile.jpg

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That's right paisan! Dominic Salvatore Gentile. He was from Ohio, but what the heck.

8 hours ago, 150GCT_Veltro said:

Bump for italo americans!

 

 

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Bah still working on this guys. Need voices soon. The Christmas break screwed me up from getting this launched properly. Need to confirm some things with the team before I have you start recording anything. My goal is to have this all done by the end of January. The work, once you start, should only take you a few hours. The hard part is just explaining to you how to do it properly. 

 

Jason

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Guys,

 

If you have any suggestions or know of any British RAF callsigns for flights, airfields or forward air controllers please send them to me via PM or post them here. We have plenty of American ones, but need British ones now. 

 

Jason 

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I believe that the RAF changed their squadron and airfield callsigns quite a few times during WW2, and read somewhere that at one point squadron callsigns were linked to the airfield where they were based rather than being constant. Not a subject I know much about. Hope you can find some Bodenplatte-specific ones. Cheers.

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Jason can you give us an example script so we can post sound clips here? 😊

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Wikipedia says that the callsigns for RAF forward air controllers were "Rover Paddy" and "Rover David":

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forward_air_control_operations_during_World_War_II

https://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/44/a8892444.shtml

 

Quote

 

The initial solution to fleeting targets was the British "Rover" system. These were pairings of air controllers and army liaison officers at the front; they were able to switch communications seamlessly from one brigade to another—hence Rover. Incoming strike aircraft arrived with pre-briefed targets, which they would strike 20 minutes after arriving on station only if the Rovers had not directed them to another more pressing target. Rovers might call on artillery to mark targets with smoke shells, or they might direct the fighters to map grid coordinates, or they might resort to a description of prominent terrain features as guidance. 

 

Call signs for the Rovers were "Rover Paddy" and "Rover David" for the RAF; the names were those of the fighter pilots who originated the idea. The American version was "Rover Joe"

 

 

There are a couple of notes about callsigns at the end of The Big Show, namely that the 3 sections of a squadron were identified by colors: Blue Section, Red Section, and Yellow Section. These would then be identified over the radio as, for example, Blue Leader (or Blue 1), Blue 2, etc.

 

From this link, it is said that the RAF phonetic alphabet from 1942-45 was 

  • Apple
  • Beer
  • Charlie
  • Dog
  • Edward
  • Freddy
  • George
  • Harry
  • In
  • Jug/Johhny
  • King
  • Love
  • Mother
  • Nuts
  • Orange
  • Peter
  • Queen
  • Roger/Robert
  • Sugar Tommy
  • Uncle
  • Vic
  • William
  • X-Ray
  • Yoke/Yorker
  • Zebra

RAF callsigns for airfields were quite extensive. There is a list of the Bomber Command ones here, as of 1944:

 

http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/showthread.php?13346-Bomber-Command-Sqn-amp-Stn-W-T-callsign-list

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I'm willing to help.  I've got the "general American" accent like you'd hear on most American TV.  Also had acting training in college!

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Things are substantially as Luke describes:

 

For communication within a squadron, pilots identified themselves by section, followed by the position within their section:

 

The primary section was usually Red Section (with the sortie's commanding officer leading Red Section), followed sequentially by Blue Section, Yellow Section and (if operating in vics) Green Section. By sections, pilots were positioned as “leader”, “two”, “three” etc.

 

"This is Gannic Leader. Red and Yellow Section follow me, Blue section stay high."

 

"Blue Leader Speaking, Bandits Up-Sun, Angels-Two-Zero... Prepare to Break to Port on my Command!"

 

These designations were positional and not specific to either a particular aircraft or pilot. They were allocated on a sortie by sortie basis at the discretion of the senior officer flying. One day you could be flying Spitfire B for Beer as your CO's wingman, call sign: Red Two, and another day you could be Blue Leader flying D for Dog.

 

Bomber Command (and units operating heavy/ heavier aircraft) may have employed different methods of identification, linking crews to specific aircraft, hence an aircraft ID letter based call sign. This would contrast with the fluid allocation of call signs employed within fighter / strike and tactical reconnaissance squadrons.

 

For communication outside the squadron pilots would be required to required to identify themselves by their squadron's call sign. IIRC Pierre Clostermann (Big Show) made frequent reference to this practice, as did Jeffrey Wellum (in First Light). They respectively state their squadron call signs were FILMSTAR and GANNIC (72Sqn).

 

Wikipedia has a listing of Squadron call Signs for the Battle of Britain, but I'm quite sure these were changed periodically to obscure the pattern of squadron deployments and are unlikely to have endured through to 1944/45: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Battle_of_Britain_squadrons

 

On this subject I wonder if they are listed in “2nd Tactical Air Force - Volume Four” (Shores and Thomas), but I don't have a copy of Volume Four myself. Perhaps there is someone out there with a copy to hand, possibly willing and able to loan it for the duration?

 

Wing Commander Johnnie Johnson recalled being chided by his Intelligence Officer for failing to change his call sign “Greycap”. It was believed to be well known to German Signals Intelligence.

 

On RAF R/T usage see: “Forget-Me-Nots for Fighters”, 13 Group, 1940.

 

This collection of everyday pilot's wisdom was presented mostly in the form of humorous cartoon style illustrations. The Imperial War Museum's copy bears the hand written inscription “Pilot's Mess. Not to be removed” and “Please sign last page when marked – learned and inwardly digested. S.L.” Their example bears 20 signatures of 13 Group servicemen, dated 1942.

 

Reporting of enemy

 

DON'T get excited, and DON'T shout. Speak slowly into the microphone. Report ALL aircraft, not one group, then a few minutes afterwards another one below or above.

* * *

If you see a formation of enemy aircraft look all round it, and report its escorts at the same time, using the clock system, and giving their height above or below you.

* * *

It is also quite a good idea when you have finished to put your R/T set on to receive.”

 

R/T

 

Remember that “Silence is Golden.”

* * *

Maintain R/T silence unless you have some-thing important to say. Always say who you are; speak slowly – if it is really important speak slower than usual. This is quicker than having to repeat.”

 

Use hand signals if you can. Remember that the Leader will tap his microphone if he thinks you have left your transmitter on. If you are guilty you had better avoid him when get home.”

 

Don'ts

 

NEVER forget that the HUN is listening to nearly everything you say either on R/T or in the “Local.”

 

Be careful what you say on the former, and always resist the temptation of describing even you most successful patrol at the latter. It would be very hard to do so without telling HITLER something that he would like to know.”


 

2nd Tactical Air Force: Volume Three, From the Rhine to Victory, January to May 1945” (Shores and Thomas, 2006):

 

Operational Control

 

With the formation of 83 and 84 Groups came the requirement to provide operational control of the aircraft under their direction in the battle area. This was accomplished by the formation of a corresponding Group Control Centre (GCC) for each Group, much like the familiar Fighter Command Sector Operations Centres. In the GCC operations room the positions and directions of aircraft or formations within the area of operations were marked on a large horizontal map table, with plaques detailing numbers, height, and identification of each 'track'. The GCCs were fed by information from mobile radar units via landline or W/T links and communicated with the aircraft under their control by R/T (radio-telephone); callsigns for 483 and 484 GCCs (as they were formally numbered) were 'Kenway' and 'Longbow' respectively. Officers responsible for the planning and tasking of operations to be carried out by the Airfields (later Wings) within the Group were accommodated in cabins alongside the operations room. A large number of mobile signal units provided the R/T, W/T and telephone communications to facilitate the above organisation and the numerous links required to the Wings and other units under the control of the Group."

 

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Well.. if you guys need some backup.. as it seems u have many already. 

American-  Mid 20s - California born and raised

I'd be happy to help if you guys still need it. 

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Guys,

 

When calling out enemy aircraft or speaking about wind speed did the Brits use Imperial or Metric in WWII? Need advice. I think they used Imperial measurements, but need to be sure before we start recording.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Jason

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Definitely Imperial. Metric units were hardly even thought of in Britain until the 60s. Windspeed is still given in mph in forecasts here in the UK.

Edited by 216th_Cat

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This kind of work will take me back to my P-3C Orion days and a 'Sensor 3' (Electronic Warfare Operator) Aircrewman.

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Guys,

 

Another quick confirmation before anyone records anything. For things like wind speed reports in WWII  - US and UK towers and crews would report in knots correct? For instance - wind from the Northwest at 15 knots. And would they say fifteen knots or one-five knots?

 

My military friends can only confirm for me what is said today, not in WWII USAAF and RAF. Any of you guys know for sure?

 

Jason

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A good question. The British Met Office seems to have used MPH for windspeed records during WW2. Given that the RAF began converting from using MPH for airspeed indicators to Knots during the latter part of the war, I suppose it is possible that they did the same with windspeed, but I wouldn't count on it.

 

As for how they reported numbers over the radio, again I'm not sure, they certainly used 'one five' rather than 'fifteen' when reporting altitudes (in thousands of feet): one of the first films made about the Battle of Britain was entitled Angels One Five, and since it dated from 1952 I think it unlikely they'd have got it wrong.

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I have all of the Meteorological Office weather reports for the UK from 1939-45. In the daily summary the wind strength is notified by Force, i.e. Beaufort Scale. In the monthly summary the strengths are in knots. Seeing as the address for the Meteorological Office is Air Ministry, Kingsway, London WC2 and that the Beaufort Scale was standardized for the Royal Navy who did everything in knots, it might be assumed that the weather predictions for the RAF would be in knots as well.

 

Edit: the weather predictions for D-Day appear to have been issued from the Beaufort Scale, e.g. Force 5. https://medium.com/@wwnorton/the-weather-on-d-day-85ea0491a14f

Edited by 216th_Cat

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What would an RAF tower tell pilots? Knots or MPH for wind. That is the question at hand. I have conflicting info. I have the sheet set up for MPH at the moment since the RAF didn't seem to convert to knots officially until very late in the war.

 

And what did RAF pilots say for numbers like say 13  - did they say thirteen or one-three when speaking?

 

Jason

 

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This has the potential to be a tricky one. I'm fairly sure that historically the met. service used nautical measurement conventions, and shipping for most of their data collection, but by the start of the Second World War the collection of meteorological data was a joint endeavour between the met., the Admiralty and the RAF.

 

Below is an account of a lady who worked as a met. Assitant, reporting to bomber command. Though her testimony is quite dry in places she gives the structure of the organisation quite succinctly.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/70/a8440670.shtml

 

I believe that all branches involved in collecting data worked in neutical measurements for collection / collation, but that these were then rendered to service-specific requirements.

 

https://rafmetman.wordpress.com/meteorology/ww2-meteorology/

 

I would have expected the RAF to use miles because their charts and air-speed indicators were scaled / calibrated in miles.

Edited by Johnny-Red

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3 hours ago, Jason_Williams said:

And what did RAF pilots say for numbers like say 13  - did they say thirteen or one-three when speaking?

 

It would have been one-three; I have a copy of a WW2 USN phraseology handbook, and it discusses the proper enunciation of numbers. Saying things like "one-three" instead of "thirteen" was used, so that there wasn't any confusion over what was meant ("thirteen" could easily be confused for "thirty").

 

EDIT: here is the most relevant page from the manual: note that it says it is standard for all the services, and how to pronounce each numeral: 

 

IMG_20190113_194550.thumb.jpg.2dd65031adb689339f962b99ed4b03b8.jpg

Edited by LukeFF

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The FAA 7110.65 has all the phraseology we've been using since 1950.

 

- Air Traffic Controller, First Class

  United States Navy

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