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Books - What are you reading?


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i mainly read this forum, but what is more important i writte in this forum

 

im too creative to read, i need to write, i often think i should write a book, but am i not doing so here

 

the romantic internet prosa on tales of modern customs by Lan aka raaaid

 

ill leave this here

 

im labeled as schizophrenic

 

but what that does actually mean is i take all mypersonal experience, not tv or news of course and interpret reality with it in the most positive posible way even if it means counterstream accepting god and magic

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Recently I read Sapiens by Yuval Harari. An incredibly well put together story of humankind's history that is thought provoking and with revelations that may rock your foundations. An easy read and I highly recommend it.

 

Book Review: "Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind" by Yuval Noah ...

 

Since I have recently watched the movie "Hurricane" and "Dark Blue World" I am interested to understand the story of the Polish and Czeck nationals during WW2 especially in the context their migration to Britain and their relationship to and their roles in the RAF. Any recommended lite reading?

 

 

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Picked this one up from the bargain bin outside a local bookshop recently.  The author mentions in the preface that he didn’t know anything about aviation before researching this book, but he does his best to fill it with lots of entertaining facts.  
 

Did you know for example that the Spitfire IX had cannons that fired at “sixty rounds per second” and were absolutely devastating to all-wooden aircraft like the Mitsubishi Zero And Nakajima Ki-43?
 

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Bought this years ago and started reading it again. Have his autobiography as well. Can't imagine why I'm reading them again. ;)

 

The man is both a marvel of a human being and a genius with words. And a wonderful respite from the modern whiners and moaners who only think they know how to reason and speak.

 

Funny little book in that half of it is printed upside down.

 

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Edited by CanadaOne
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2 hours ago, CanadaOne said:

Funny little book in that half of it is printed upside down.

 

 

A collector's item! $$$$$

 

What I am reading at the moment?

Last Witnesses: Unchildlike Stories by Svetlana Alexievich.

Each short story of what happened in the lifes of Belarusian and Russian children during WWII is if you are reading Hector Malot's Alone in the World.

 

After I finish Last Witnesses I plan to read The History of Slavery: from Mesopotamia till Modern Human Trafficking by Dick Harrison.

I didn't know for instance that 30% of the Italian population during the Roman Empire was a slave. And today the estimated number of slaves is 40 million including 10 million child slaves. Way more than the often quoted 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th century together.

 

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Edited by Uufflakke
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1 hour ago, LukeFF said:

Finally finished Shattered Sword this weekend. I only wish all military history books were as well-written as this one. 

 

Indeed. A must-read. 👍

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On 6/14/2020 at 9:41 AM, LukeFF said:

Finally finished Shattered Sword this weekend. I only wish all military history books were as well-written as this one. 

Savage book, really breaks it down, moment by moment. And it wasn't all "luck" after all.... 

Exhaustingly meticulous, but engrossing. 

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Salutations,

 

I purchased two books to use as research for my planned series of Tank Crew missions covering Patton's armor and the Battle Of The Bulge. Unfortunately, it will depend on how detailed the maps are and the number of new American and British armored vehicles are presented for use. With just the Sherman, it would prove very dull. I'll have to wait and see.

                                                                                                                                                                  

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Edited by Thad
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Ordered this used paperback. Good reviews from a physics and operations PhD. Should be interesting.

 

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Quote

Alan D. Zimm is a member of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory’s Principal Professional Staff, serving as Section Leader in the Aviation Systems and Advanced Concepts Group. He received a B.S. in physics from UCLA, a M.S. in Operations Research from The Naval Postgraduate School, and a doctorate from the School of Policy, Planning, and Development at the University of Southern California, with a concentration in Policy Analysis and Strategic Planning.

A former naval officer, he served as a nuclear power qualified surface warfare officer with over fourteen years of sea duty in carriers, cruisers, destroyers and hydrofoils. He was the executive officer aboard USS Pegasus (PHM-1) during her record setting run through the Panama Canal, a record likely to hold up since the Canal no longer allows hydrofoils to transit while foilborne. He completed his service as a Commander, USN.

At APL, Dr. Zimm has performed and led studies of the J-UCAS in maritime defense, Offensive Anti-Surface Warfare Analysis of Alternatives, DD(X) design trade studies, Advanced Gun System trade studies and effectiveness analyses, trade studies employing Naval Surface Fire Support with guns, aircraft, field artillery and missiles in an expeditionary warfare context, studies to define and evaluate the characteristics of surface-launched anti-ship missiles, studies on Maneuver Warfare doctrine, and mathematical modeling of economic social systems.

He has published extensively, with over 90 books and journal articles in the fields of naval and military history, decision theory, chaos and organizational theory, military strategy and theory, and computer combat modeling and simulations. He published an award-winning computer simulation modeling World War II naval surface warfare. His most recent book is “Attack on Pearl Harbor: Strategy, Combat, Myths, Deceptions,” published in May of 2011.

Dr. Zimm received the 1999 Arleigh Burke Award from the U. S. Naval Institute. He was awarded a Hafstad fellowship in 2002 and a Janney fellowship in 1998, and was awarded a Reining Award Distinguished Citation from the University of Southern California in 2003. Dr. Zimm is an honorary life member of the United States Naval Institute and a member of the Military Operations Research Society.

 

Edited by cardboard_killer
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On 6/14/2020 at 8:17 AM, Bremspropeller said:

Just ordered that one myself yesterday...

 

I will be interested to see what you guys think (especially with your technical background and knowledge of the New Guinea campaign).  This one has been an Audio Book for me so I don't have the photos and reference notes, but it is well narrated, seems properly researched and the writing style definitely holds my attention.  Since I am not driving as much these days, it is taking me longer to get through it, but I have learned a lot about pilots (I knew nothing of Kearby), the Campaign, and the Lindbergh trip.

 

From a GB standpoint, it was also really interesting to read about the P-38 pilots' feelings about the P-47.  I know in BoBp, I feel exactly the same way.

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14 minutes ago, cardboard_killer said:

I was talking to a friend of mine yesterday and it came out that she had never read The French Lieutenant's Woman, simply a fantastic work of literature. I got so excited, I started re-reading it.

 

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Tremendous book. Another of his that I really liked is 'Daniel Martin'. I didn't know this when I read it, but apparently the American critics loved it and the British ones hated it. Good job that I'm not, as a Brit, a critic. 😏

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A newly published book, Race of Aces, tells the story of the race to be the top fighter ace in the Pacific theater, so it is about Richard Bong, Gerald Johnson, Neel Kearby, Tom Lynch. Accounts of their victories and their mistakes, which often cost them their lives. One thing I learned which I did not know was that on occasion some of these guys would go off and hunt Japanese planes, ON THEIR OWN! Sometimes they took a single wingman. They were so confident in their abilities they felt they could get away with it. Of course, we're not talking dogfights here, we are seeing how many of these victories were scored, which was a boom and zoom, high altitude to low altitude attack and get the hell out. Great book, though.

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31 minutes ago, Feathered_IV said:

Cracking good read

Agreed. This is excellent. Really makes you feel 'there'. Would recommend reading Alistair MacLean's HMS Ulysses as a companion piece alongside this, MacLean's unremittingly grim tone is an interesting contrast to Forester's.

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Water Margin: Outlaws of the Marsh

As it is one of China's most popular books, it must have been read by tens of million of people in China and in Japan.

If not hundreds of millions since it was written way back in the 14th century.

 

A lot of fighting, looting, plundering and brigandry. Often compared to Robin Hood: stealing from the rich and giving it to the poor.

But that is not that often the case in Water Margin: Outlaws of the Marsh.

 

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Her own fault. She should have listened to her husband.

 

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Edited by Uufflakke
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Okinawa - a well written account of the campaign, good mix of the personal experiences from both sides and the tactical picture, could have used one or two more maps, although the ones in there are OK. Mostly just lets the participants and facts speak for themselves, which is a refreshing change.  Does argue that dropping the bomb was inevitable and justified, partly given what the Okinawa campaign had suggested an invasion would be like.

 

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Just finished " Aces Falling: War Above The Trenches, 1918 " by  Peter Hart , before that read "Bloody April: Slaughter in the Skies Over Arras, 1917" and "Somme Success: The Royal Flying Corps and the Battle of The Somme 1916" - all must read for ww1 enthusiast. 

What to read next ....

  

 

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Edited by 1PL-Husar-1Esk
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