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CanadaOne

Books - What are you reading?

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2 hours ago, CanadaOne said:

 

Yeah, that's it. Not a happy story. Funky ending though.

I read that story when I was 14 or 15 years old. Because of it I have never had the desire to get a tattoo or piercing.

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4 hours ago, Gordon200 said:

I read that story when I was 14 or 15 years old. Because of it I have never had the desire to get a tattoo or piercing.

 

I hear ya.  :biggrin:

 

I got one a few years ago, never gave that story a thought though.

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i started reading paradise lost, myself i wouldnt rebel for i belive all its a lie, you can just trust your personal experience

 

and though im the most miserable knight who ever dueled i have to say im touched by the beauty of evry single momnet ive lived so far

 

doctors say my case its an excess of dopamines, god bless the dopmanines

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Unfortunately I'm not reading anything terribly classic at the moment.  I'm slogging through Lucky 666 by Bob Drury.

It's one of those history-lite hero books that are so common nowadays.  Written by emotion enthusiasts with a limited grasp of their subject.  Did you know for example, that the P-38 was a fighter plane derived from the British Spitfire?  Or that B-17 gunners were reluctant to bail out in case they were cut in half by the aircraft's twin rudders?

 

FullSizeRender-4.jpg

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On 7/13/2018 at 10:05 AM, CanadaOne said:

You mentioned Barbara Tuchman previously. Have you read her book "The Zimmerman Telegram"? It's a wonderful and colourful little book that adds significant detail to the relationship between Britain and the US during the war years.

 

No, this is my first book of hers that I've read. I've not read much WW1 literature and with this being such a landmark in the genre, I knew this was a good place to start.

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On 7/12/2018 at 11:37 PM, unreasonable said:

 

Including it's own taboos. ;)  

 

It's not about 'taboos' or intolerance of 'poor little' Milo; sometimes intolerance of things is just the right way, and those who want to 'discuss' it in the modern world in any light other than as abuse and grooming can {Edited}  off.

Edited by Bearcat
Language

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43 minutes ago, ChiefWH said:

 

It's not about 'taboos' or intolerance of 'poor little' Milo; sometimes intolerance of things is just the right way, and those who want to 'discuss' it in the modern world in any light other than as abuse and grooming can fuck off.

 

Not sure why you have been stewing over this for days, Chief, but you make my point for me. Intolerance so extreme that it cannot be questioned or discussed is exactly that: a taboo. Here is wiki's definition:

 

 "a social or religious custom prohibiting or forbidding discussion of a particular practice or forbidding association with a particular person, place, or thing."

 

Despite our liberal outlook, we still have them, different now from two thousand years ago, or even two hundred, and I have no doubt will be different again two thousand years in the future. Also you really should not use quotation marks in that way, (edit -ie "poor Milo" was neither said nor implied)  since I certainly did not. It is, quite frankly, dishonest.

Edited by unreasonable

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On ‎7‎/‎16‎/‎2018 at 1:06 PM, LukeFF said:

 

No, this is my first book of hers that I've read. I've not read much WW1 literature and with this being such a landmark in the genre, I knew this was a good place to start.

 

 

I've read a few dozen books on WWI. I find the time frame fascinating. Like a post in the ground separating the old world and the new.

 

This is another very good Barbara Tuchman book along with The Zimmerman Telegram. Though the chapters about the plague do not make for happy bedtime reading. But she's an excellent writer and historian.

 

 

IMG_20180711_201853.jpg

1 hour ago, Bremspropeller said:

I read aviation- and space related books mostly.

 

Sorry for being boring 😅

 

Not boring at all.  :cool:

 

I tend to watch more space documentaries than read space books. Gotta love the big screen HD action for Black Hole documentaries and stuff like that.

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On 7/17/2018 at 3:06 AM, LukeFF said:

 

No, this is my first book of hers that I've read. I've not read much WW1 literature and with this being such a landmark in the genre, I knew this was a good place to start.

 

I'd highly recommend All Quiet on the Western Front and Somme Mud. Can't beat the stuff written by the men who were there.

 

On 7/16/2018 at 7:03 PM, Feathered_IV said:

Did you know for example, that the P-38 was a fighter plane derived from the British Spitfire?  Or that B-17 gunners were reluctant to bail out in case they were cut in half by the aircraft's twin rudders?

 

Please tell me that's not actually in the book...

Edited by FFS_Cybermat47

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On ‎7‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 6:25 PM, CanadaOne said:

 

I enjoy freedom of expression no matter how weird. The envelope of free expression always has to be pushed, otherwise it contracts

 

Sir,

    I have thoroughly enjoyed reading in this topic. The range of interests and discussion of subjects, particularly philosophy is amazing. One is seldom able to engage with one’s compatriots to this degree.

     Continuing in this vain, would it be permissible, with all humility and due respect, to ask the following question: Do you really know all the words to “The Lumberjack Song”?

     (Sorry, I could not find a “pompous Twit” emoji (referring to myself) to use here.)

:unsure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZa26_esLBE

 

 

 

 

Edited by Arfsix
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21 minutes ago, Arfsix said:

 

Sir,

    I have thoroughly enjoyed reading in this topic. The range of interests and discussion of subjects, particularly philosophy is amazing. One is seldom able to engage with one’s compatriots to this degree.

     Continuing in this vain, would it be permissible, with all humility and due respect, to ask the following question: Do you really know all the words to “The Lumberjack Song”?

     (Sorry, I could not find a “pompous Twit” emoji (referring to myself) to use here.)

:unsure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZa26_esLBE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If and when I wear women's clothing is not something I am prepared to discuss in an open forum.

 

Unless I'm drunk. :drink2:

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1 hour ago, CanadaOne said:

 

 

If and when I wear women's clothing is not something I am prepared to discuss in an open forum.

 

Unless I'm drunk. :drink2:

 

It seems to be a very English thing, the country being neither very puritan nor very macho for most of it's modern history: although I expect there must be equivalent traditions elsewhere.  An American lady friend remarked on it years ago at a college year end do that involved several men in lingerie Morris dancing.  I think it stems from the theatrical tradition which is strong in the UK, in which traditionally women's roles were played by young men. Except in the Pantomime, where the Principal Boy is always played by an actress.  Drag artists have always been popular.  

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8 hours ago, unreasonable said:

 

It seems to be a very English thing, the country being neither very puritan nor very macho for most of it's modern history: although I expect there must be equivalent traditions elsewhere.  An American lady friend remarked on it years ago at a college year end do that involved several men in lingerie Morris dancing.  I think it stems from the theatrical tradition which is strong in the UK, in which traditionally women's roles were played by young men. Except in the Pantomime, where the Principal Boy is always played by an actress.  Drag artists have always been popular.  

 

 

Stems back to Greek theater I guess.  And the chorus wearing phallic facemasks... I tell ya.

 

God bless Aristophanes. Monty Python definitely followed in his footsteps. They must have pissed themselves laughing when his plays were performed.

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On 7/16/2018 at 5:03 AM, Feathered_IV said:

Unfortunately I'm not reading anything terribly classic at the moment.  I'm slogging through Lucky 666 by Bob Drury.

It's one of those history-lite hero books that are so common nowadays.  Written by emotion enthusiasts with a limited grasp of their subject.  Did you know for example, that the P-38 was a fighter plane derived from the British Spitfire?  Or that B-17 gunners were reluctant to bail out in case they were cut in half by the aircraft's twin rudders?

 

FullSizeRender-4.jpg

 

B-17s had twin rudders?

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23 minutes ago, Bearcat said:

 

B-17s had twin rudders?

and a leaky elsan toilet by the looks of things....nightmare!

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17 hours ago, FFS_Cybermat47 said:

I'd highly recommend All Quiet on the Western Front

 

That was the 1st book I read cover to cover, back in the 1970's, but the impression it made on me at the time was so strong it's still with me. I would love to be able to read it in it's original German version.

 

 

On 7/12/2018 at 1:26 AM, CanadaOne said:

The Scots built this country. :drink2:

 

There's something in that, my great grandfather left the north west coast of Scotland to work on the Canadian-Pacific rail road construction back around 1910, he was a carpenter who did fancy staircases and the like on the big rail road hotels. He never made it back home and is buried in a place called Prince Rupert in British Columbia.

 

Cool thread anyhow, very memory provoking...oh as far as philosophers go, this would be my kind of guy :)

 

Epicurus

 

Epicurus.jpg

Edited by Pict
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I've started reading the 20.5 volume Master & Commander series again from the beginning.

 

First time through was a little over ten years ago. I've just finished the first book...reading about the characters again is like catching up with old friends.

 

I was lucky enough to sail a tall ship for a couple of summers in my much younger days so this series really takes me back to my happy place. Or better said, a place where things make sense to me. I recommend them to anyone, don't let the nautical jargon or historical minutiae turn you off...plenty of resources and references on the internet now.

 

 

IMG_20180720_182736696.jpg

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23 minutes ago, 19//Rekt said:

I've started reading the 20.5 volume Master & Commander series again from the beginning.

 

First time through was a little over ten years ago. I've just finished the first book...reading about the characters again is like catching up with old friends.

 

I was lucky enough to sail a tall ship for a couple of summers in my much younger days so this series really takes me back to my happy place. Or better said, a place where things make sense to me. I recommend them to anyone, don't let the nautical jargon or historical minutiae turn you off...plenty of resources and references on the internet now.

 

 

 

 

Love the Aubrey/Maturin series! I even have the cookbook that some die-hard fans cobbled together from the descriptions in the books.

 

YkGueu5.jpg

Edited by 216th_Cat
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I haven't read any of Patrick O'Brian yet, although I did blast through all of the Hornblower novels a couple of years ago.  Is the Aubrey series similar?

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10 minutes ago, Feathered_IV said:

I haven't read any of Patrick O'Brian yet, although I did blast through all of the Hornblower novels a couple of years ago.  Is the Aubrey series similar?

 

I haven't read the Hornblower books yet, but I recall reading a comparison online saying that O'Brian does a better job of putting the reader in that "world" with all the details etc. But the premise is the same, if you like sea stories from the Napoleonic era and sailing ships you will love it.

 

The Odd Couple bromance between Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin alone is worth the price of admission. There is a ton of subtle humor, particularly verbal gaffes or other miscues on Jack's part...he is a much more likeable and interesting character in the books than in the movie.

 

I recommend giving the first book a shot...commit yourself to reading it all the way through before you make up your mind!

 

55 minutes ago, 216th_Cat said:

 

Love the Aubrey/Maturin series! I even have the cookbook that some die-hard fans cobbled together from the descriptions in the books.

 

YkGueu5.jpg

 

I can't believe some of the chow back then...and the constant drinking LOL!

 

A great reference you may be aware of is called "A Sea of Words"...fantastic accompaniment to the series.

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4 hours ago, Feathered_IV said:

I haven't read any of Patrick O'Brian yet, although I did blast through all of the Hornblower novels a couple of years ago.  Is the Aubrey series similar?

 

O'Brian's books are more literary - in a good way - and less focussed on keeping the action and story moving along. As Rekt says the Aubrey/Maturin relationship allows O'Brian to explore facets of the culture of the time in a much more sophisticated way than Forester did. 

 

I enjoyed the series, but there were occasions later on when I thought that a little more moving the story along would have been a good thing.  A Napoleonic land war analogy might be War and Peace vs The Sharpe series, although that difference is more extreme. 

 

 

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Fantastic!  Summer hols are here, the beach is calling and I've just rediscovered a box full of Flashman novels by George Macdonald Fraser!:biggrin:

 

Edit.

 

 I confess;   the closest I come to the Classics is 'I, Claudius':)

Edited by DD_Arthur

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