Jump to content

Tips for MP?


Recommended Posts

So I've played maybe 10 MP matches so far. In that time I have a total of 2 kills. One of which I was in a Stuka and shot down a Yak that dove at me, overshot, and slid right into my crosshairs (lol). Point is, I'm not very good. So I was wondering if people had any general dog fighting tips for noobs getting into MP?

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 kills in 10 matches for your first attempt at MP? 

 

That's not bad at all! I've heard people complain about going a month before scoring their first kill in MP.

 

To be honest, I think the best advise for a newcomer in MP is to focus on survival, not kills.

 

Make getting your aircraft back to base your #1 priority (and #2 and #3 as well) Treat every flight were you make it back alive as a huge victory and every one where you die as a failure - even if you got three kills in a row before dying.

 

Learning how to stay alive will teach you basically all the things you need to know to get kills as well, short of the gunnery itself.

 

Also: Do go on Youtube and watch Reqiuem's tutorial videos. Especially some of the latest ones, where he deals with things like the geometry of the fight. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwV5RLX7mkaDy5gTIiuwGmg

Edited by Finkeren
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the encouragement and advice. I think what I need to do is get better at landing then. I have very few clean landings.

 

Probably the most difficult thing for me to get a handle of on most servers is simply where the objectives and enemies are if there are no icons allowed on the server. Particularly on the Stalingrad or Moscow maps, because the topography is so samey. I have only flown on Kuban twice, but it's funny how much easier it is to navigate for me than Stalingrad, which is a map I have played for dozens of hours offline. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm also a noob so i won't be giving actual dogfight tips. But i think it's important to understand that this game is quite hard to master, most people simply need a good amount of time/practice to get significantly better. Also multiplayer is many times harder than SP, most of the people you will meet have a huge experience.

And yes, watching tutorials and knowing tactics is useful, and there are many great  vids out there, but (in my experience) it worth almost nothing if you do not practice and develop the muscle memory to confidently control your own plane in the first place.

Also i'm not sure if i can agree with Finkeren about survival being no.1. I mean i can fly in the 190 at 5k alt for hours without getting  shot down but i don't feel like I'm good nor that i'm improving doing that.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty new myself, and even after a month or so a vast majority of my kills are against unaware fighters or bombers. That being said, I'd recommend that you try to figure out what gets you killed the most often and adapt to that. Myself, I've found that I'm rather poor in a dogfight, so I started building my confidence through dirty (literally) tactics, keeping down at treetop level 15-20km between enemy airfields and objectives, pouncing on en-route fighters/attackers like so (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnMisUX2EGU shameless self-plug). Nowadays I've been trying more high-altitude flying with 109's and MiGs to learn the skills to do well up there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would recommend two things for newcomers to MP. First get into fights when you can. This doesn't sound like a problem for OP but some are hesitant to do engage because they don't know how to fight. You will never really learn how to fight if you don't get into the fight in the first place. You will lose fights when you start out. Hell you will lose fights even after you've become better. But the key is to get into the fight and be cognizant of what you are doing and what is being done around you. If you can't keep that in mind while you are in a fight, the which is hard, record them and go back and watch the footage over again and look for things you need to improve on and take that information into a practice fight; the game has a built in recorder that is great for this. I've found quick missions are a good training ground for basics but the limitations of the AI will only allow you to improve so much. Bring a new idea to your next MP fight and see if they work. If they don't work try something else or try what you were doing in a slightly different way; not all tactics are applicable in every situation. Don't worry so much about KDR or pulling off the perfect shot the first time every time. The more you shoot the guns the more familiar you will get with them, accuracy will come with practice. The second thing is find someone to play with, even better if you can talk to them while you are doing it. There is nothing like teamwork to even up a fight and if you can find someone who will help you identify your weaknesses and ways to improve on them you will get better faster.

Link to post
Share on other sites

rule nr.1: - Fly for red (ussr) not for blue germans and your life will be OK :))))))

 

well: now seriously: 

 

- take as low fuel as is necessary. Not more.

- take a proper ammunition - gunpods are nice but reduces speed and maneuverability - dont take them in the beginnings

- Dont go into each action. Just attack when you know you can manage it and survive.

- When in maneuvers use your throttle lever to instantly work with the throttle. Reduce, Increase, you must still play with it. 

- Simultaneously with Throttle, you must use your flaps in turnings and maneuvers. Just learn what is the best setting for your plane you fly.

- dont fly alone. Try to join someone and use his help, In contrary you can help to him. Not needed be connected via microphone, it is enough just to fly close to others.

- still check your six, and sky all around you. 

- And the biggest one:  -  ENJOY your flights. And still watch the beautiful IL2 BOS sceneries.... 

- Yeah another one - Buy VR headset. 

- Yeah the last one: - dont have a kids.... you will have more time for flying :D

 

See you.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Any advice really depends on the server you fly on.

 

TAW - stay alive is the #1 priority above all else. Climb above contrail altitude and suddenly markers are back on!. Get on teamspeak -  many people are there and communicate well. Flying in a group is the fastest way to learn where the action is and how to get involved without being a sitting duck

 

 

WOL - grab any aircraft, fly high (5-6km) and learn to spot the dot around you. Proceed to fly to the most popular enemy runway until you either spot something and get tangled with them, or you end up at their runway - proceed to strafe the aircraft on the ground. Gives you good practise on AAA strafing and a few easy kills on taking off aircraft. If anyone complains - ignore them, its not against the rules and 50% of the server population does exactly this. Survival on the server is meaningless as well, as you are not penalised for it (unlike TAW). So both teams tend to not care - you regularly get bombers ditching after they drop the payload to get back to base faster and start again.

 

 

And thats about it, no other servers have comparable popularity to be specific about them. 1CGS official usually has 20 players or so, and it has markers on - fly there if you want an easy time. Action dogfights and tanks is another server where you can just fly randomly hoping to get a kill or ram a tank with your aircraft. Good fun. And if you are just up to for some furball dogfighting - Berloga is good if your ping is acceptable.

Edited by JaffaCake
Link to post
Share on other sites

On WoL the action is usually about halfway between the two closest airfields on a map. Or over objectives. Remember, people are lazy, most go straight lines from front line airfield to closest objective. Stalk these lanes and you'll find someone to bounce. WoL has a marker for yourself so that makes nav easier. Having said that, Stalingrad is pretty easy navigation in summer. Moscow is a pain I agree, regardless of season. You just need to practice identifying features. Rivers are usually your best friend, cities second.

 

If you want to just get into a fight to test your situational awareness and how far you can push a plane, Berloga can be good for that.

 

Coconut Expert is in my opinion ideal, as it's heavily objective based so you can always find something to do even when player count is low. And with 20 or so people on you can generally intercept in a few known transit lanes or over objectives without instantly being swarmed by another half a dozen enemies you didn't see (like on WoL).

Link to post
Share on other sites

@ OP - 2 kills in 10 missions?? The force is clearly strong with you. I've been playing online for like 6 months and have precisely three non-AI air-to-air kills...

 

I've had some good fun in WOL, but more enjoy the slightly more involved / consequential gameplay you can find on TAW or the Coconut Expert server.

 

Actually Coconut Expert is good as it has a mix of human players & AI patrols / strike packages. Worth doing some reading about it if you haven't already. 

 

As everyone else has said, getting on some voice comms with other players is invaluable.

 

While this may seem boring, pick an aircraft and stick with it. Knowing your planes capabilities by feel & habit is very useful. I tend to use the 109 if I am blue & the Yak 1 if going red.

 

Realise that by stonking around in the sky looking all sexy in a fighter you may not actually be helping your team win the map. Them Il2's are there for a reason. Go move some mud! (I like to do this as I can usually put at least SOMETHING on my scorecard...)

 

If you've been running CAP over an objective & you're running short of fuel, you can always usefully strafe the AAA before you RTB...

 

As I say though, 3 kills in 6 months. Perhaps my advice is not the best!

Link to post
Share on other sites
One of which I was in a Stuka and shot down a Yak that dove at me, overshot, and slid right into my crosshairs (lol).

 

This is how it's done - let them fly through your cross-hair - just open fire a moment before so target will have intersect bullets stream.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Berloga duel and dogfight helped me. 

the furball area has air starts, pick a side then pick a fighter and modifications. You will get shot down frequently, but almost of all of your time is spent practising valuable combat experience. 30 minutes combat in berloga might represent many hours of equivalent combat experience on some of the more Hardcore servers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I must echo earlier sentiments.

 

DO NOT FLY ALONE (if you don't have to)

 

I know there are some folks who have some misgivings about getting on TeamSpeak or Discord, but I have found that, overall, most people are very friendly and happy to help a new comer. I know the group I fly with are always trying to help someone when they pop in. We use the Official BoS TS3 channel, so anyone can join in the fun, and many do! Don't be bashful, I have met some great folks here and we have a blast flying together. Just keep in mind, it is WAY EASIER to watch your six when you have 2, 3, or more people helping you do it, and you do the same in return. To be cliche'.... Teamwork makes the dream work. :biggrin:

Link to post
Share on other sites

To practice gunnery, offensive and defensive maneuvering, and test limit of the aircraft of your choice, go to Berloga. That way you will improve your situational awareness as well. Personally, I can recommend flying blues in there, because you will learn discipline pretty quickly. It is one big furball and you will have harder time defend against yaks and lalas on deck, but when you finally do that, you can do that in anything. After you get this basics, go to WoL and practice patrolling and proper setup for an attack.

Link to post
Share on other sites

To practice gunnery, offensive and defensive maneuvering, and test limit of the aircraft of your choice, go to Berloga. That way you will improve your situational awareness as well. Personally, I can recommend flying blues in there, because you will learn discipline pretty quickly. It is one big furball and you will have harder time defend against yaks and lalas on deck, but when you finally do that, you can do that in anything. After you get this basics, go to WoL and practice patrolling and proper setup for an attack.

 

This^^^^^^^^

Link to post
Share on other sites

The most important lessons to learn when moving from SP to MP is 'You are not as good as you think because human enemies are way better and more unpredictable than AI enemies.' and 'Accept that you will die a lot, no really 'A lot', in the first few weeks.' :-)       You will be meeting pilots that have 'survived' thousands of hours of intense combat.  Hundreds of pilots that have individually racked up more kills and survived more dogfights than all the LW Aces combined.   Luckily you will also meet some people like me that have been dogfighting for decades and still suck :-)

Edited by 56RAF_Roblex
Link to post
Share on other sites

go to Berloga. It's a must have training center for up close dog fights. It, however, is probably not a good place for a boom&zoom activity. But this place will teach you avoidance tactics very quickly.. that is if you're able to recognize the sneak attacks ... which are 99% is how you die in Berloga. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dogfight is patience, experience and training.

 

 

 

What astonishes me about real pilots in WW2 is how incredibly unbalanced it must have been, because you had many professional pilots (who had trained before and during the war) going up against people with very limited -and in some cases insanely limited- experience. I think I heard that they circumvented this problem by mixing noobs with very experienced pilots, and if you can find a teacher to tell you where you are going wrong that's probably the best and quickest way to learn. For me the hardest part is knowing what to do when someones on my tail, I just tend to panic and flail around like a kite!

 

When you play games like this and you die, and die, and die, and die, over and over again, it just makes me wonder how the hell did anyone survive to participate in documentaries about the war!

Edited by Wolf8312
Link to post
Share on other sites

What astonishes me about real pilots in WW2 is how incredibly unbalanced it must have been, because you had many professional pilots (who had trained before and during the war) going up against people with very limited -and in some cases insanely limited- experience. I think I heard that they circumvented this problem by mixing noobs with very experienced pilots, and if you can find a teacher to tell you where you are going wrong that's probably the best and quickest way to learn. For me the hardest part is knowing what to do when someones on my tail, I just tend to panic and flail around like a kite!

 

When you play games like this and you die, and die, and die, and die, over and over again, it just makes me wonder how the hell did anyone survive to participate in documentaries about the war!

 

 

Take 1024 people in a room. Ask them to flip a coin. Everyone who got head dies loses. Proceed until you are left with around 1 person. Now ask him to tell you a story how he masterfully managed to flip his coin in such a way that he got tails 10 times in a row or so.

 

Some people survived the war through luck of circumstances and their talent. We mostly get to hear about them as they are there to tell the story. You rarely get to know the story of that 17 y.o. who just took off on his first mission only to get BnZ'd without ever seeing the enemy aircraft.

Edited by JaffaCake
Link to post
Share on other sites

So I've played maybe 10 MP matches so far. In that time I have a total of 2 kills. One of which I was in a Stuka and shot down a Yak that dove at me, overshot, and slid right into my crosshairs (lol). Point is, I'm not very good. So I was wondering if people had any general dog fighting tips for noobs getting into MP?

 

From my old days flying...general guidelines.

I had a 13-1 kill ratio or so.

 

Stay high, stay fast.

That way you're either higher than everyone else, or when you dive on someone you're faster than everyone else.

 

head on a swivel

 

Fly as if it's your actual life on the line as much as you can mange - you'll make better decisions.

 

All deaths can be traced to a mistake that you made...figure out what that mistake was each time and make a mental note of it.

 

Know the strengths of your aircraft, and stay within that envelope.

I used to intentionally drag opponents to the deck when flying the Zero, or the I-16 because I knew I had them there.

Most guys let me drag them there because they figured they were good enough to manage it, or that "just this once, even though it's dumb" decision kicked in...and they always died.

Don't be that guy. I did it sometimes and got away with it, a flaps down, gear down kill in a Mustang against a Ki-43 comes to mind...but it was dumb.

He wasn't very good or he'd have killed me instead. I made other similar mistakes and died...it takes discipline to make the right decision, especially

when your adrenaline is pumping and you WANT that kill.

 

Practice your gunnery and bounces on the AI...it works.

By the time I got online I'd been flying offline for so long that the adjustment was fairly small.

A snapshot is a snapshot, and it's the instinctive snapshot that you'll have to master. You can't see him, he's been out of sight for

a second or two, but you now where he is, and where he's about to be, and you know where to put your rounds so that he flies through it....instantly, without thinking about it.

 

Get to know one aircraft, know everything about it's envelope.

Know it's strengths, how high should you be, what happens when you turn on the edge down low,

know it's corner speed (corner speed is something I see ignored A LOT around here)

Know EXACTLY how fast you can dive before things start flying off, and practice diving and recovering a few KPH below that speed.

 

Don't care about getting kills. This is huge.

The more you care, the more you'll take chances that will get you killed.

Be happy taking off, flying around for 40 minutes, and landing back at base with no fight, or with a brief fight that you were able to exit from.

 

My last online flight in BoS was several years ago no, but I took the Yak-1 up solo, spiraled high over my base and headed off.

I  jumped a few 109's and we had a swirling fight that lasted only a few turns before I disengaged. I flew back and landed....and I was happy.

Learn to appreciate that as much as getting a kill, and you'll get killed less. Leave the ego.

 

Fly with buddies is the obvious one, but that's not always possible.

I learned to fly and survive, and get kills on my own (although I enjoyed COOps much more) and if you can do that, flying with buddies is even easier.

 

Good luck

Edited by Gambit21
Link to post
Share on other sites

When you play games like this and you die, and die, and die, and die, over and over again, it just makes me wonder how the hell did anyone survive to participate in documentaries about the war!

One important thing to keep in mind when comparing this sim to real life air combat is, that we constantly experience and readily accept rates of attention that would be absolutely catastrophic and completely unsustainable in real life. Loss rates of 50% on the losing side of a fight is at the low end of the spectrum in this sim, where in reality that would pretty much mean that the entire squadron had been depleted and put out of action.

 

At the worst of times during WW2 the crew of a Soviet IL-2 had an average “life expectancy” of 8 missions, which was considered unsustainable by even the most cynical VVS commander. Think about it: Do you make it back safely 7 out of 8 times you jump into an IL-2 to go ground pounding?

 

In reality pilots in WW2 were a hell of a lot more caucious and flew and fought much more conservatively. They only had that one life to lose, and their main objective on any mission was always survival - not just for the individual pilot, but on a tactical squad level as well.

 

That is also part of the reason why the majority of fighter pilots never scored a kill and many never even fired their guns at a target despite flying multiple combat missions. A few pilots managed to “get beyond” mere survival and began to be able to actually focus on killing the enemy, fewer still got good at it, but those few aces account for the majority of kills achieved during the war. Now in the sim most players try to act like this small minority of “killers”, with varying degree of success, and the results are predictable: A massive slaughter.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What astonishes me about real pilots in WW2 is how incredibly unbalanced it must have been, because you had many professional pilots (who had trained before and during the war) going up against people with very limited -and in some cases insanely limited- experience. I think I heard that they circumvented this problem by mixing noobs with very experienced pilots, and if you can find a teacher to tell you where you are going wrong that's probably the best and quickest way to learn. For me the hardest part is knowing what to do when someones on my tail, I just tend to panic and flail around like a kite!

 

When you play games like this and you die, and die, and die, and die, over and over again, it just makes me wonder how the hell did anyone survive to participate in documentaries about the war!

Great tips, everyone thanks and keep em coming. To your point Wolf, from what I've read the experience level was huge. Luftwaffe pilots with combat experience in Spain had an edge against French and British pilots during the Battle for France and then Russia, Japanese pilots had an edge over US pilots after Pearl Harbor due to prior combat experience in China. As attrition took its toll the experience edge flipped to the Allies. By the end Germany and Japan were sending rookie pilots into battle like lambs to the slaughter. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 Japanese pilots had an edge over US pilots after Pearl Harbor due to prior combat experience in China.

 

Well...the Zeke was also the class of the skies from 1941 into 1943 - that didn't help.

Not taking anything away from the Japanese pilots.

Once they figured a few things out the Cactus Wildcats gave as good as they go though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great tips, everyone thanks and keep em coming. To your point Wolf, from what I've read the experience level was huge. Luftwaffe pilots with combat experience in Spain had an edge against French and British pilots during the Battle for France and then Russia, Japanese pilots had an edge over US pilots after Pearl Harbor due to prior combat experience in China. As attrition took its toll the experience edge flipped to the Allies. By the end Germany and Japan were sending rookie pilots into battle like lambs to the slaughter.

There also was a slight difference in philosophy regarding the use of especially fighter pilots between the Luftwaffe and its opponents. Since way back in Early Modern history Prussian (and later German) military doctrine had emphazised aggressiveness over everything else. The idea was always to seek out the enemy force and defeat it decisively in the field. That philosophy carried over into the Luftwaffe, where fighter pilots were encouraged to prioritize the destruction of enemy aircraft.

 

Most other air forces viewed its fighter force as primarilly a supporting force. When on escort duty, they were in support of the bombers. When patrolling or intercepting enemy attacks they were protecting the targets on the ground. When performing close air support, they were supporting ground troops. The destruction of the enemy air forces were almost always secondary or even tertiary to the supporting role.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well...the Zeke was also the class of the skies from 1941 into 1943 - that didn't help.

Not taking anything away from the Japanese pilots.

Once they figured a few things out the Cactus Wildcats gave as good as they go though.

Oh, no doubt. The zero was an outstanding plane up through 42. But the Japanese were producing far better fighters than the Zero in the last year or so of the war, and they were getting demolished. It wasn't the plane, it was the pilot. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, no doubt. The zero was an outstanding plane up through 42. But the Japanese were producing far better fighters than the Zero in the last year or so of the war, and they were getting demolished. It wasn't the plane, it was the pilot.

 

Yep - the Zeke was a match for early Hellcats even in the hands of the right pilot.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, no doubt. The zero was an outstanding plane up through 42. But the Japanese were producing far better fighters than the Zero in the last year or so of the war, and they were getting demolished. It wasn't the plane, it was the pilot. 

 

So true. By 1945 the average Japanese combat pilot was entering into air combat with very little experience in flying and even less in flying and fighting. They were up against huge numbers of very well trained pilots.

 

In the virtual world too.. Good piloting matters more than the aircraft. The thing about the virtual combat piloting is that we've got people with 15 years or more of WWII flight sim experience. They are very very very good. And that's tough sometimes for newer players or less practiced pilots to go up against. Still, with good teamwork and proper tactics you can usually do pretty well.

 

2 kills in 10 sorties is not bad at all!

I just checked and my current WoL score is 4 air to air kills for 16 sorties. Of course the other thing to check on is what else you've been doing. Most of my 16 sorties have been ground attack and strike missions. So 47 ground targets destroyed.

 

If you got a kill on an enemy aircraft while flying a Stuka you were probably not doing a combat air patrol. You were probably trying to destroy a target. That's just as valuable an ability and not to be underestimated either.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

WOL - grab any aircraft, fly high (5-6km) and learn to spot the dot around you. Proceed to fly to the most popular enemy runway until you either spot something and get tangled with them, or you end up at their runway - proceed to strafe the aircraft on the ground. Gives you good practise on AAA strafing and a few easy kills on taking off aircraft. If anyone complains - ignore them, its not against the rules and 50% of the server population does exactly this. Survival on the server is meaningless as well, as you are not penalised for it (unlike TAW). So both teams tend to not care - you regularly get bombers ditching after they drop the payload to get back to base faster and start again.

 

It doesnt matter the server, just dont do this. Dont be one of those douches who take off from the park area and then proceed to either vulch the enemy af or camp around it.

  • Upvote 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

WOL - Survival on the server is meaningless as well, as you are not penalised for it (unlike TAW). So both teams tend to not care - you regularly get bombers ditching after they drop the payload to get back to base faster and start again.

 

Until your side loses because they ran out of aircraft, because guys think like this. Edited by StickMan
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Numbers and team tactics also explain differences in combat between real life and the sim. Even if Taiho had a full air group of aces flying A7Ms in 1944 they would still have been hideously outnumbered. And even when we play on Discord we rarely have the kind of "one pair attacks the other does top cover" discipline of real air forces, never mind that they stack those tactics to multiple groups of dozens of planes while we're in 2s and 3s. OK maybe some of you guys on TAW do thay but as Finkeren said people generally prefer to just dive in for kills and the result is a mess.

 

So from a practical tips point of view, the key as has been said is to stay above the chaos, pick someone off and get out.

I might get crucified for saying this but depending on your mood that can run counter to having fun. Sure flying around is immersive and satisfying but the itch is there and if you've been flying for 40 minutes with no action it takes its toll. I would side with those guys telling you to take risks and not worry about deaths too much (at least while you're learning) over the guys advising the ideal cautios style from the get-go. You can transition to caution later and you'll learn more from a death than a disengage.

 

Also I would say that plane choice matters depending on how you want to fly. If you know you can't resist getting into fights and are on a server like WoL where you get those messy low furballs, consider taking a Yak as it thrives in that kind of environment. If discipline comes easy to you take a 109, and so on.

 

Also, specialise if you like but at least give everything a go. It's an eye opener regarding the capabilities of your potential enemies.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

If anyone complains - ignore them, its not against the rules and 50% of the server population does exactly this.
 

 

I tend to disagree. I usually fly on WOL server and my main goal is to survive. You won't get any points if you die or get captured. Strafing enemy airfield is a risky business and not many come back alive. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some humble advice from someone that still struggles himself:

The instant furball servers are great for honing gunnery and dogfighting skills. Some very skilled pilots there. But those servers lack the dimension of strategy and even other seemingly less important skill sets.

On the hardcore servers, it's not necessarily a game of quick reflexes but rather a game of chess. With time you learn and develop strategies, when to engage or disengage, what risks to take or not and how to be part of a team effort. These things become rivals in importance to raw pilot skills. As an example, if you struggle with navigation and and spend too much time checking the map/landmarks, you will fail to notice those 4 contacts aproaching. Your dogfighting and gunnery skills won't matter.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I tend to disagree. I usually fly on WOL server and my main goal is to survive. You won't get any points if you die or get captured. Strafing enemy airfield is a risky business and not many come back alive. 

 

 

 

I was mostly commenting that from my own experience of repeatedly getting strafed by LW on take off. Happens super frequently, and there really isn't any penalty for vulching (which is a good thing IMO, as it is realistic). However WOL doesn't have dynamic campaign or personal progression like TAW, so the team-based loss of aircraft is very meaningless. Win/Loss of the map is also very much meaningless - you just move on to the next map.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some humble advice from someone that still struggles himself:

 

The instant furball servers are great for honing gunnery and dogfighting skills. Some very skilled pilots there. But those servers lack the dimension of strategy and even other seemingly less important skill sets.

 

On the hardcore servers, it's not necessarily a game of quick reflexes but rather a game of chess. With time you learn and develop strategies, when to engage or disengage, what risks to take or not and how to be part of a team effort. These things become rivals in importance to raw pilot skills. As an example, if you struggle with navigation and and spend too much time checking the map/landmarks, you will fail to notice those 4 contacts aproaching. Your dogfighting and gunnery skills won't matter.

 

This is very true.

 

What I liked about Berloga though is that its almost like intensive training flying your kite on the edge of the envelope, you get a good appreciation of just what your bird can and cannot do. For example people will tell you that the 109 is an energy fighter, and ofc it is, and it does its job very well, but damn can it turn :)

 

but yes, get used to just flying and navigation and general handling first, then focus on what you feel you need practice in to help you survive. For chess like strategy, I guess research, and always fly with at least one wingman. For aim and defensive flying the likes of Berloga is fine.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

What I liked about Berloga though is that its almost like intensive training flying your kite on the edge of the envelope,


It really is intensive training. And no point in flying 20 minutes before getting bounced from nowhere on a full real server, if your biggest problem is that you can't hit the hangar in front of you while parked. Both types of gameplay are very different and you choose whatever you prefer. But worth mentioning they require different skill sets.
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was mostly commenting that from my own experience of repeatedly getting strafed by LW on take off. Happens super frequently, and there really isn't any penalty for vulching (which is a good thing IMO, as it is realistic). However WOL doesn't have dynamic campaign or personal progression like TAW, so the team-based loss of aircraft is very meaningless. Win/Loss of the map is also very much meaningless - you just move on to the next map.

TAW does has that sense of penalty and personal risk to it but ...

When flying on it recently, there was minimal effort in pilots on both sides to engage the Ground Targets.  Pilots were not dying but they were not doing the required ground work to get the tactical ground battle going.  Then you will get teams on comms on the German side who gang up and sit high waiting to swoop anyone who on the VVS side did mud moving.

 

Their trick is to hover over a known tactical target at Alt and await AA to give them notice of low down Mud Movers and then they swoop in to kill wounded partially crippled VVS Ground Attackers trying to disengage and return to base.

 

This is not skill, it is a base and easy way to earn points and stoke ego.

 

VVS pilots would call out such flyers and then they would be staying clear of that target but on the German side there was no effort to deal with Soviet Ground forces so the result was a shy stand off between players on both sides.  Also the AA associated with a tank column on TAW is severe with many accurate small AA.  Mud Moving is in my opinion, discouraged there.

 

We don't have the same time input in Sim as real world pilots would have and for WW2 Eastern Front, we don't have the numbers either online.  To be honest to recreate what those guys would have experienced.  Be lucky with co-ordinated teams to have 2 + 2 working together on objectives. 2 Attack Aircraft and 2 Covering where as in real life it would have been more for a single mission.

 

High flying German tactics in small groups of course were valid tactics used historically by the Germans but, it didn't do them any favors with helping the Ground War in the East. 

 

Learning to handle a combat air craft?  See how you go Full Real learning to handle it at optimal speed without bleeding too much energy.  Learn both Vertical maneuvers and Horizontal where by at their end, you still have Decent Energy in your plane of choice.  Then take it online, approach a Fur Ball with observation and only when sure you can make a clean pass at a recognised target, enter in and make your move.  Just be sure to have an exit point and disengage before you loose too much of your Aircraft's Energy.  This I also need to master LOL :biggrin:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...