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On the topic of Thunderbolts

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2 hours ago, Legioneod said:

I know, but I'd much rather have to take a break in between use rather than only get 5min total.

Realistically we should be able to run it until it runs out of water but I doubt that is how it will be in-game, after we run out of water 52" would be our maximum allowed power (or is it 56" can't remember) since running any higher would be too dangerous without water.

Of course, if we get 150 fuel we won't need water at 65" we'll be able to run without it.

At least one of the P-47D manuals (the one I've read) mentions limits for use of WEP to 5 minutes, and states you have enough for 15. But you're right, they don't mention how long to 'rest' the engine.

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3 hours ago, Legioneod said:

I know, but I'd much rather have to take a break in between use rather than only get 5min total.

Realistically we should be able to run it until it runs out of water but I doubt that is how it will be in-game, after we run out of water 52" would be our maximum allowed power (or is it 56" can't remember) since running any higher would be too dangerous without water.

Of course, if we get 150 fuel we won't need water at 65" we'll be able to run without it.

 

Yup, I'm sure it would have no problem. It is 60-62"Hg without water. Which I imagine would be equal to 56"Hg with Water

It doesn't look like we are getting 150 octane. By the looks of it there isn't a single 8th Airforce P-47 skin so I don't think the P-47 in game will have any influence on getting 150 octane.

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3 hours ago, RedKestrel said:

At least one of the P-47D manuals (the one I've read) mentions limits for use of WEP to 5 minutes, and states you have enough for 15. But you're right, they don't mention how long to 'rest' the engine.

If there was such a thing as a „resting“ phase, they would state it in the manual. Don‘t confuse game mechanics with real engines. As long as your engine doesn‘t overheat, you can run it at that rating.

 

Also, the „5 minute limit“ has a different meaning for people that fly missions that last for hours instead of that happy fragging we do, where 15 minutes may well be the whole of the mission.

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2 hours ago, DSR_T-888 said:

 

Yup, I'm sure it would have no problem. It is 60-62"Hg without water. Which I imagine would be equal to 56"Hg with Water

It doesn't look like we are getting 150 octane. By the looks of it there isn't a single 8th Airforce P-47 skin so I don't think the P-47 in game will have any influence on getting 150 octane.

Interesting, so it's 62" when you run out of water when running 100 octane? It say that in manual?  I've read the power settings without water before but I can't remember.

6 minutes ago, ZachariasX said:

If there was such a thing as a „resting“ phase, they would state it in the manual. Don‘t confuse game mechanics with real engines. As long as your engine doesn‘t overheat, you can run it at that rating.

 

Also, the „5 minute limit“ has a different meaning for people that fly missions that last for hours instead of that happy fragging we do, where 15 minutes may well be the whole of the mission.

Agreed, the 5 min rating was to preserve the engine for future flights, it was more than capable at operating at 64" until the water ran out. The main reason for using water at 64" with 100 octane is due to the risk of detonation, that's why the maximum allowed power is lower without water, unless we get 150 fuel.

 

150 fuel would give us the ability to run 64-65" without water which would be nice, but I doubt we'll see it in game.

Edited by Legioneod

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6 hours ago, ZachariasX said:

If there was such a thing as a „resting“ phase, they would state it in the manual. Don‘t confuse game mechanics with real engines. As long as your engine doesn‘t overheat, you can run it at that rating.

 

Also, the „5 minute limit“ has a different meaning for people that fly missions that last for hours instead of that happy fragging we do, where 15 minutes may well be the whole of the mission.

I'm aware of that. But as far as I can tell the dev team adheres pretty strictly to limits stipulated in the manuals, and implements 'rest' periods for the engines before using boost/higher settings again in game. So what we'll likely get in game is 15 minutes of water injection with individual uses of 5 minutes or less, with a break in between. if the manual had specified 'resting' the engine (even just for cooling down from overheating or something) we might have a hint of how long that might be. But, as you say, real life engines are a bit different than the ones in the sim.

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As posted above - if the engine had several hours worth of water, it could still run in WEP until the water ran out.

15 min is the real world limit only because that’s how much water was available.

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2 minutes ago, Gambit21 said:

As posted above - if the engine had several hours worth of water, it could still run in WEP until the water ran out.

15 min is the real world limit only because that’s how much water was available.

 

Agreed. Still leaves the question of how they will implement it in-game, we shall see when they release it.

Edited by Legioneod

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On 10/26/2018 at 8:52 PM, Thad said:

Question. Just how much flight time do any us spend flying above 7,000m? I think most desire to mix things up nearer the deck.

 

My point? Craft high altitude performance actually have a very, very minor impact on gameplay. It's good to know but will not very significant. 😐

Few days back, while TAW was till on, I was fighting 2 LA5FNs at 9km alt. I was in G2 and I was rather sweaty, since they caught me up at every alt unless I dove away. Frankly, I fight between 5 to 9km regularly.

Edited by CSAF-D3adCZE

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Just now, CSAF-D3adCZE said:

Few days back, while TAW was till on, I was fighting 2 LA5FNs at 9km alt. I was in G2 and I was rather sweaty, since they caught me up at every alt unless I dove away.

 

In G-2 you are slightly faster than the FN between 3500 and 6000 m. FN's boost gives it nothing in that gap.

 

Yeah if theres a target with heavy flak and enemy fighters are expected, you want to sweep it at 6000 to 8000 m(or even higher) even in East Front. Too much altitude is much better than not enough.

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I still stand by my contention that most pilots will not be flying very much at the altitudes where the upcoming aircrafts high altitude performance boost comes into play.

 

Mark my words.  :salute:

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6 minutes ago, Thad said:

I still stand by my contention that most pilots will not be flying very much at the altitudes where the upcoming aircrafts high altitude performance boost comes into play.

 

Mark my words.  :salute:

I agree most fights wont occur at high altitudes but quite a few will. Even without high altitude fights the P-47 will remain competitive, it just won't be top dog like it would be above 25k ft.

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Don't misunderstand.... I love the P-47 and am looking forward to it and expect it to have an impact in the air war.  :salute:

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3 hours ago, CSAF-D3adCZE said:

Few days back, while TAW was till on, I was fighting 2 LA5FNs at 9km alt. I was in G2 and I was rather sweaty, since they caught me up at every alt unless I dove away. Frankly, I fight between 5 to 9km regularly.

 

no suprise as in this game la5fn is one of best high alt fighter, radials like 190a3,a5 and la5s preform like crazy up high in this game, its bug or some new insight in thouse airplanes that history missed

Edited by 77.CountZero
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Very Nice video of a Veteran

Sad, he passed on a few days after this video was uploaded.

 

 

Edited by Legioneod
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P-47D maximum ammo configuration (425RPG according to pilots' notes) testing

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Talon_ said:

P-47D maximum ammo configuration (425RPG according to pilots' notes) testing

 

 

 

Thanks for the testing Talon, now that with 6 more guns!  😀

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425rpg is very nice but it's not all; you can have 600rpg in the P-40, already. It's 8 guns @ 425rpg what makes the difference.

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5 hours ago, Ehret said:

425rpg is very nice but it's not all; you can have 600rpg in the P-40, already. It's 8 guns @ 425rpg what makes the difference.

 

 

Needs more Dakka. 

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22 minutes ago, Cpt_Siddy said:

 

 

Needs more Dakka. 

 

Dakka is always a good thing.

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8 hours ago, VO101Kurfurst said:

 

But of course - never enough Dakka!

Unless you're D.T.

 

But seriously folks, those eight .50s are going to be so much fun! I'm almost hoping they beef up the damage model for locomotives just to present a challenge to all that lead.

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Wish I could have talked to him and asked him some questions. Any longer interviews with him?

 

Top P-47 ace Gabby Gabreski just in case you don't know.

 

 

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Being doubted last year on my claim that the jug could return with cylinders and pistons shot off I came across the pictures I referred to. However not with the information I remember followed them. Radials are wonderful design. You can see the pistons found loose in the cowling

32239745-7862-41F5-B24B-7C05857C40F4.jpeg

A27E2CB4-814C-4B38-8CA8-B888BC20B6A6.jpeg

FB48E2A0-5F33-4002-B2E1-4721DC9A7D62.jpeg

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That is the remains of a cylinder head in the first photo. The a/c in the 2cd photo had an oil line cut.

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1 hour ago, LuseKofte said:

 

 

A27E2CB4-814C-4B38-8CA8-B888BC20B6A6.jpeg

 

 

 

You have a little oil smudge there. No... higher... to the left... theeeeere, you've got it.

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1 hour ago, LuseKofte said:

Yes it is not the same airplane I showed it for visual reference on how much oil the radial can loose and stil turn

Yep, wish it had the same potential in game. What's even more incredible is that aircraft flew more than two hours (or was it 200 miles? I can't remember) like that before it landed iirc.

Edited by Legioneod

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10 hours ago, Legioneod said:

Yep, wish it had the same potential in game. What's even more incredible is that aircraft flew more than two hours (or was it 200 miles? I can't remember) like that before it landed iirc.

I am sorry, I can’t remember either,  all these pictures was presenter with pilot , where , what and when when I read about them. They flewback to base and showet no Sign of cutting . Really amazing engines, 

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Narration by: Ed King, P-47 Pilot 347th Ftr. Sqd, 350th Ftr. Grp. MTO, ETO WWll, 1944-45

January 12, 1945, Strafing Attack Bresica, Italy Railroad Marshalling Yard

On January 12th, the weather condition over the Poe Valley was reported as unsuitable for dive-bombing. The Valley was covered with layers of solid to broken clouds, plus a broken to scattered low scud deck. A mist of rain also filled the air.

Since flying conditions on the south side of the Apennine Mountains were good, I was assigned to lead a flight of four on a combination weather and armed reconnaissance mission into the far reaches of northern Italy.

Upon arriving over the Bresica Area, we were able to spiral down and around the clouds to a relative low altitude. An active railroad marshalling yard, crowded with rolling stock, was spotted through a break in the scud below. Also, sighted alongside, was a protecting anti-aircraft battery.

In the belief I could take the gun pit out-of-play myself, the others were radioed to orbit out-of-range until called. There was just not room for all of us to maneuver in such close quarters.

As I was closing in on a firing pass, the gun pit opened fire, scoring a direct hit in my aircraft’s engine. At once, a heavy oil spray flowed from under the cowling, completely covering my glass canopy. My first reaction was to climb for altitude into the clouds because in my mind, a bailout was close at hand.

The other flight members were notified of my plight and advised to return to home base. Weather conditions would have made finding me very difficult if not impossible.

While in a climbing mode, the canopy was opened in preparation for abandoning ship. As the canopy opened, a heavy spray of hot oil hit me full in the face. For some reason, I had always carried a clean rag in the cockpit, to be used for whatever the need. In this instance, the need was to wipe the oil out of my eyes. I also discovered that by leaning well forward the oil spray missed my face.

Upon reaching a comfortable altitude, the ship was leveled between a layer of clouds. The Area Radar Controller was contacted and the situation explained. He was also told of my decision to remain with the aircraft for as long as the engine kept running. At this point, my location was approximately 140 miles from my home base at Pisa, of which 120 of those miles were over enemy territory.

In a calming voice, the Controller gave me a heading towards the nearest coastline. In the event open sea could be reached, an air/sea rescue may be possible, even though I would still be behind enemy lines.

All clouds were cleared as I approached the coastline near La Spezia. After passing over the coast, a turn was made towards the south. As I proceeded down the coast, the enemy anti-aircraft coastal batteries apparently decided to make my situation a little more interesting because they opened fire. By this time, I was in no condition to take evasive action even though flak was bursting all around me. It was of utmost importance that my altitude be maintained. Fortunately, there were no hits scored by their gunners.

At around the 10 to 15 mile range from home base, more and more throttle had to be added, in order to hold my altitude. Engine oil starvation was evidently beginning to set in.

In the meantime, an aircraft had sent to guide me the rest of the way home. As he joined me from the left, he was waved-off. It was apparent my engine would not hold out for a long straight-in- approach.

A high down-wind leg was entered. By now, the throttle was in an almost full forward position and the engine instruments were about to blow their tops.

Turning onto a close base leg, gear and flaps were dropped. Upon reaching the “now or never point”, the aircraft was put into a steep sideslip on the way down to runway level. At the same time, the engine came to a grinding halt with the propeller frozen in an upright position. Touchdown was made about a quarter of the way down the runway and the aircraft coasted clear at the far end.

One of the things I remember clearly was the Tower Operator screaming for me to “level out” as I was nearing runway level. It must have appeared to him that I could not see well enough to break my glide. However, with that big four bladed prop acting as an airbrake, I had to make sure there was enough airspeed to maneuver the aircraft into a landing position.

After coming to a stop, the emergency crewmen who met me had looks of dismay on their faces. Their looks were justified because the whole of me, the cockpit and the aircraft were a black, greasy mess.

Upon leaving the cockpit, I was quickly ushered to the Flight Surgeon’s Dispensary. My face was cleansed and my eyes flushed out. Outside of being somewhat excited and my eyes burning, I appeared none the worse for the experience.

Within the hour, a return was made to the aircraft for a picture taking and debriefing session. One of the pictures taken that day is on display in the Air and Space Museum, WWll Army Air Corps Section, Washington, DC. A picture of that “oil covered” P-47 that brought me home safely, is posted along with several other aircraft that made it back on a “Wing and a Prayer”.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Dauntless said:

 

 

same propaganda as always, hard hiting, tuff engines and durable wings and so on, we know from game thats not true 😄

Someone should introduce him to power of british airplanes engines and guns, he probably never heared about Tempest V, now thats heavy hiting , great engine and durable airplane.

Edited by CountZero
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3 hours ago, CountZero said:

 

same propaganda as always, hard hiting, tuff engines and durable wings and so on, we know from game thats not true 😄

Someone should introduce him to power of british airplanes engines and guns, he probably never heared about Tempest V, now thats heavy hiting , great engine and durable airplane.

Can't tell if this is sarcasm or not.  Are you saying that the GAME'S DM proves the p47 wasn't a durable aircraft?

 

Not sure I've ever seen a claim like that before lol.

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Dauntless said:

 

 

 

Beginning right at the 12:22 mark, I feel like he's addressing some folks right here in these forums that whine about the P-47 cause they aren't using it properly 😂

Edited by DBFlyguy

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9 hours ago, =BES=Senor_Jefe said:

Can't tell if this is sarcasm or not.  Are you saying that the GAME'S DM proves the p47 wasn't a durable aircraft?

 

Not sure I've ever seen a claim like that before lol.

Yes game dms prove that 47 was not durable, 109 was tuffest airplane in ww2 and best engines were build by slaves in underground bunkers in germany, history is clearly just american propaganda and that guy in video is just repeting it, also .50 cal was just good for paint scrach, americans clearly hated their pilots when they build airplanes with only .50s, brits atleast wonted to hurt their enemys so they used hispanos on airplanes.

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20 hours ago, =BES=Senor_Jefe said:

Can't tell if this is sarcasm or not.  Are you saying that the GAME'S DM proves the p47 wasn't a durable aircraft?

 

Not sure I've ever seen a claim like that before lol.



Sometimes sarcasm can be hard to spot among people who actually believe odd things like this lol 

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3 hours ago, 357th_Dog said:



Sometimes sarcasm can be hard to spot among people who actually believe odd things like this lol 

I would never believe this type of stuff lol.  But I'm continually amazed as the absolute idiotic trash that many people believe nowadays and continue to spread their vitriol.  Just look at any online news outlet comment section.

 

I can't tell anymore whether someone's being funny, or incredibly stupid!

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